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Clarinet

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NEWS
February 13, 2002 | By Daniel Webster FOR THE INQUIRER
The clarinet, often a supporting player in ensembles, takes prominence largely on the basis of the player. Igor Begelman is one of those performers capable of making the instrument an eloquent narrator, a stage chameleon, and something of a star. The young, Russian-born clarinetist was the center of a Sunday program, "Igor Begelman and Friends," that gave listeners at the Trinity Center a survey of how this instrument inspired composers since it had come of age over the last two centuries.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 27, 1990 | By Nels Nelson, Daily News Jazz Columnist
Quincy Jones calls Eddie Daniels "The Monster Clarinetist. " Pianist-composer Roger Kellaway, who collaborated with Daniels on two of his most memorable recordings ("Memos from Paradise" and "To Bird with Love"), describes him as a musician who has no limitations. Leonard Bernstein notes that Daniels puts him to mind of Artur Rubinstein: "He is a thoroughly well-bred demon. " Superlatives are very much the norm when Daniels is the subject. Daniels, in fact, is his own superlative - he's not the least bit shy about coming on strong about himself.
NEWS
September 25, 2002 | By Daniel Webster FOR THE INQUIRER
It shows great confidence in a performer when a season-opening gala is built around a clarinet, something usually buried in orchestral music or treated like a folk instrument to be tolerated rather than encouraged. The Astral Concerts for All Seasons began at the Kimmel Center's Perelman Theater with Igor Begelman and five other instrumentalists exploring music with distinctively national flavors. Begelman speaks boldly through the instrument. His virtuosity expresses itself through eloquence more than showiness, for eloquence incorporates shaded sound through a wide range, precise intonation, etched technical passages, and an instinct for the witty turn of phrase.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 14, 1999 | By Daniel Webster, INQUIRER MUSIC CRITIC
Any clarinetist who plays Heifetz transcriptions has set himself apart from the herd. But it is not by mere celerity that Igor Begelman makes his expansive effect. The young Russian-born clarinetist, who played a recital Friday at St. Mark's Episcopal Church in Center City, has reached a level of security in which the clarinet is his voice. Listeners were not aware of fingers, keys, reeds or breathing as he effortlessly searched the limits of the instrument's capacities. Its limit was only that of Begelman's imagination, and there was no sign of any boundaries in this program.
NEWS
August 23, 1991 | by Nels Nelson, Daily News Jazz Columnist
It has taken a full year for the news to come out that Billy Krechmer has put away his clarinet for good. On a Sunday evening last August, immediately following the 8th annual benefit birthday concert that Krechmer sponsored to raise funds for the South Jersey Regional Theater at Somers Point, N.J., this splendid and normally upbeat musician called his daughter and granddaughter to his side and addressed them in a voice tinged with melancholy....
SPORTS
May 9, 1997 | By Chris Morkides, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Jacki Armes, clarinet player and National Honor Society nominee, laughs a lot. She is studious. She is the type of person you wouldn't mind having as a friend or study partner. Jacki Armes, softball pitcher, is a different story. You don't want to be in the batter's box with Armes, Haverford High's ace, staring in at the catcher while staring holes through your psyche. "She has what her father calls 'The Look,' " Haverford coach Arnie DeMuzio said. "It's a scowl she puts on her face when she's on the mound.
NEWS
May 24, 1988 | By Charles McCurdy, Special to the Inquirer
The Concerto Soloists Chamber Orchestra looked somber as it took the stage last night at the Walnut Street Theater. Standing before their music and wearing black, the musicians looked poised for precise and scholarly performing. But the pieces on the program, even Fredrick Kaufman's 1986 composition Concerto for Clarinet, proved to be dramatic and written for light occasions or settings that were far from serious. The concert included an arrangement of orchestral passages from Monteverdi's 17th-century opera Orfeo, afternoon- music (light entertainment)
NEWS
January 26, 1988 | By Sari Harrar, Special to The Inquirer
Frank C. Langone, 80, of Woodbury, a clarinetist and saxophonist whose 50- year career as a big-band sideman included stints with the Tommy Dorsey and Jimmy Dorsey Orchestras, died Sunday at the Leader Nursing Home, West Deptford. Mr. Langone recorded and toured in the United States, Europe and South America with bandleaders Isham Jones, Jan Savitt, Meyer Davis, Lester Lanin and Howard Lanin. His recordings include "That Wonderful, Worrisome Feeling," "Sunset Strip" and "More Than You Know" with the Jimmy Dorsey Orchestra.
NEWS
April 6, 2005 | By Daniel Webster FOR THE INQUIRER
The sound that time makes consumes composers, players and listeners, for it is the essence of the art. Music exists only in the time it is performed, then lives in memory or, finally, history. The Network for New Music devoted its concert Sunday at the Settlement Music School to time in all its aspects. The otherworldly soprano Lucy Shelton sang cycles by Thomas Flaherty, Lukas Foss, Luigi Dallapiccola and Elliott Carter, all with texts that pondered time, its passage, its inevitability - and its beauties.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 18, 1993 | By Lee Winfrey, INQUIRER TV WRITER
If and when the Bravo cable channel completes its classy "History of Jazz" series, the final result should be a collector's item. The fourth episode tomorrow night matches the quality of the first three, which won a CableACE Award in 1988. Branford Marsalis, the bandleader on The Tonight Show With Jay Leno, is the authoritative and informative host of Reed Royalty, beginning at 10 p.m. tomorrow on Bravo. This hour surveys jazz's best performers on the clarinet and three kinds of saxophone: soprano, alto and baritone.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
December 24, 2015 | By Justine McDaniel, Staff Writer
Rich, easy notes slide out of Gilly DiBenedetto's clarinet, filling the room, until the old man stops and lowers his instrument. "I can't play no more," he says in a whisper brittle enough to make it sound like the truth. Then he promptly moistens his lips, raises the clarinet, and resumes the tune. It seems more likely that DiBenedetto can't not play - even against the odds. Once the band director at the storied Downingtown Inn, to which Mickey Rooney lent his name and presence, the 87-year-old was supposed to be gone by now. Battling three cancers, he was given two months to live in July.
NEWS
November 25, 2015 | By Justine McDaniel, Inquirer Staff Writer
Sparkling blue flags waved and 600 feet stepped in time as the West Chester University marching band sent a holiday tune into the darkening November sky. With drums and flutes, trumpets and clarinets, the students last week turned a campus blacktop into the winter wonderland they hope to create near New York City's Herald Square on Thursday. That's when the college musicians will have 75 seconds to dazzle tens of millions of viewers with "Winter Wonderland. " The band is one of 10 high school and college bands nationwide selected to perform in the Macy's Thanksgiving Day Parade, which typically generates huge television ratings and draws thousands to New York's streets.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 15, 2015 | By David Patrick Stearns, Inquirer Music Critic
With the tardy arrival of spring, the Philadelphia Chamber Music Society had to present a lot of indoor sunshine Sunday to lure people from the steps of the Philadelphia Museum of Art inside to Van Pelt Auditorium. But the Dalí Quartet's Latin American program alternately glimmered and blazed. Longtime concertgoers might wonder whether Latino string quartets exist at all. Well, yes, though the beautifully prepared program was largely unfamiliar, except perhaps to jazz fans who know Paquito D'Rivera, represented by two short pieces.
NEWS
August 19, 2014 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writer
Robert Harris Zimmerman, 81, of Bala Cynwyd, a lawyer and music lover, died Monday, Aug. 11, of multiple myeloma at Penn Hospice at Rittenhouse. Mr. Zimmerman was the son of an immigrant Lithuanian father and an American mother. He and his brothers, Mark and Barry, were raised in Pottsville, Schuylkill County. Though neither parent had attended high school, the Zimmerman boys excelled academically. His brothers earned advanced engineering degrees; Mr. Zimmerman graduated from Amherst College and the University of Pennsylvania School of Law. While at Amherst, he pledged Phi Delta Theta despite the fraternity's prohibition on Jewish members.
TRAVEL
April 29, 2013 | By Val Proudkii, For The Inquirer
HAVANA - Clarinets, reedy and thin, played something I'd never heard before. The low whine hung like humidity up and down narrow Consulado Avenue in Old Havana. I cocked my ear and detected the music coming from somewhere upstairs, through windows of a decaying, Spanish colonial-looking apartment building within sight of the national opera house. Brightening with each step as I drew closer, the sound wove an unforgettable sonic tapestry somewhere between laughing klezmer and the noble shriek of bagpipes.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 22, 2013 | By Peter Dobrin, Inquirer Music Critic
Does it matter why we hear the musicians we do? With its deep relationships and pedagogical bloodlines, Philadelphia risks a certain provincialism and clubbiness every time an artist steps out on stage. Astral Artists, though, is a vital hedge against that dynamic, expressed most recently on Sunday afternoon at the Trinity Center in the Philadelphia recital debut of Romie de Guise-Langlois. Where we're used to hearing refinement across all registers, this clarinetist argued for variety of tone.
NEWS
April 18, 2011 | By Daniel Webster, For The Inquirer
At a moment in Network for New Music's "Trade Winds From Japan" concert Friday, the koto and the viola, played pizzicato, shaped a scene removed from time; together they personified the bridge between Japanese and Western musical traditions. It was a magical revelation, in the midst of Dai Fujikura's Okeanos , which said more than any treatise about the ease, and difficulty, of cross-generating music from such disparate philosophies and means. The koto is both instrument and image.
NEWS
January 22, 2011 | By Sally A. Downey, Inquirer Staff Writer
Robert C. Dorris, 92, of Jenkintown, a technical marketing manager and musician, died of lymphoma Wednesday, Jan. 5, at Abington Hospice. Mr. Dorris grew up in Cleveland and earned a bachelor's degree in physics from Case School of Applied Science there. He and his wife, Kay Brightman Dorris, met in kindergarten, attended the same church, and played in their high school band together. They married in 1941. During World War II, Mr. Dorris worked on radar projects for Westinghouse Corp.
NEWS
January 7, 2010 | By David Patrick Stearns INQUIRER MUSIC CRITIC
Brahms before lunch can feel like a steak breakfast: Nothing wrong with it, but it's a lot to face before your daily defenses are fully in place. Yet what an experience Brahms' two viola sonatas were at yesterday's Morning Musicales concert, when emerging artists Teng Li (viola) and Amy Jiaqi Yang (piano) collaborated on an hour-long recital that seemed to collude with the gray winter's morning for maximum effect. The composer wrote these sonatas - originally for clarinet and later transcribed for viola - after declaring himself retired, using nearly every technique in his compositional arsenal but with a melodic sense that his somewhat dry, preretirement chamber works lacked.
NEWS
April 5, 2009 | By Sally A. Downey INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
David C. Melnicoff, 89, of Center City, an economist with the Federal Reserve Bank, a PSFS vice president, and an avid musician, died of heart failure Feb. 12 at Temple University Hospital. For 53 years, Mr. Melnicoff served on the board of the Samuel S. Fels Fund and was board president in the 1990s. The private foundation distributes grants to cultural and community organizations in Philadelphia. "He was an ace at finances and investment, and was a generous, progressive, and wise grant maker," said Helen Cunningham, the fund's director.
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