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Clarinetist

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NEWS
March 9, 2006 | By David Patrick Stearns INQUIRER MUSIC CRITIC
From note one, Ricardo Morales takes the clarinet into a sound world that's exclusively his. Comparisons with other clarinetists don't quite work. Whether he's playing concertos or incidental solos as principal clarinetist of the Philadelphia Orchestra, you're reminded of velvet-voiced opera star Leontyne Price. Or cashmere sweaters. Or moments of deep repose. What's behind that sound is a life of anything but repose, especially now that Morales is returning to his native San Juan and playing Mozart's Clarinet Concerto tomorrow during the Philadelphia Orchestra's tour of Florida and Puerto Rico.
NEWS
March 3, 1987 | By Daniel Webster, Inquirer Music Critic
The extraordinary player never sleeps. By being extraordinary, the player attracts composers who write to exploit the full limit of his technique. But by reaching that limit, some new limit suggests itself to the player - and to the next composer. One of those players, clarinetist Jean Kopperud, was cast in exactly that role last night when she played with the New York New Music Ensemble at the Settlement Music School. She was the star - in every sense - of William Thomas McKinley's Jean's Dream, which was having its premiere here.
NEWS
April 30, 2012
Joe Muranyi, 84, a clarinetist whose mastery of pre-World War II jazz led to a four-year stint with Louis Armstrong's last band - and to an improbable moment of pop stardom - died April 20 in Manhattan. The cause was congestive heart failure, said his daughter, Adrienne Fuss. Mr. Muranyi was among a handful of jazz musicians who began their careers in the 1950s but looked to an earlier era for inspiration. Although he once studied with the forward-thinking pianist and composer Lennie Tristano, he spent most of his career with Dixieland bands, and he was widely regarded as one of the premier clarinetists in that genre.
NEWS
December 12, 1988 | By Andrew Stiller, Special to The Inquirer
Famed clarinetist Richard Stoltzman soloed with the New Jersey Symphony Orchestra Saturday night in Trenton's War Memorial Theater, playing John Corigliano's highly demanding 1977 Concerto for Clarinet and Orchestra under orchestra director Hugh Wolff. Stoltzman's performance, predictably, was a marvel, preserving the highest standards of tone and intonation even in the most violent and precipitous passages. The piece itself is problematic. Its last five minutes are a corker, with the clarinet playing Gabriel to apocalyptic brass scattered around the hall.
NEWS
February 1, 1995 | By S. Joseph Hagenmayer, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Julius DiGialleonardo, 77, a clarinetist for area dance bands and the proprietor of Father & Son Shoe Repair in Camden for more than 20 years, died Sunday at St. Agnes Hospital in Philadelphia after a long battle with cancer. Mr. DiGialleonardo was an Audubon Park resident. He was born in Camden. His family moved back to Italy, settling in Rome, when he was age 7. After returning to Italy, his training as a classical clarinetist began. Mr. DiGialleonardo attended a music academy in Rome, graduating in 1936.
NEWS
March 12, 2002 | By Rusty Pray INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Wilhelm Frederick "Billy" Krechmer, 92, a clarinetist whose name once was synonymous with jazz in Philadelphia, died yesterday of heart failure at Sunrise Assisted Living in Paoli. Born in Millville, Cumberland County, Mr. Krechmer had long resided in Longport, N.J. He also had lived in West Philadelphia. Mr. Krechmer recorded with Herb Gordon's band and toured with the Ted Lewis Orchestra during the big-band era, but in Philadelphia he was known for the jazz club he owned, operated, and served as band leader for nearly 30 years.
NEWS
December 5, 2001 | By Rusty Pray INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Anthony Gigliotti, 79, who for 47 years provided musical strength, integrity and continuity to the Philadelphia Orchestra as its principal clarinetist, died Monday at Cooper Hospital-University Medical Center in Camden of complications associated with myelodysplasia, a form of anemia. Mr. Gigliotti grew up in South Philadelphia and lived in Cherry Hill. His tenure with the Philadelphia Orchestra is believed to be the longest of any principal clarinetist with an orchestra in the nation.
NEWS
April 20, 2005 | By David Patrick Stearns INQUIRER MUSIC CRITIC
The Philadelphia Orchestra's relatively new principal clarinetist Ricardo Morales leaves audiences floored with a rich, velvety tone that seems to run like slow-motion liquid over every melodic line it touches. The question at his local recital debut on Monday at the Fleisher Art Memorial (presented by the Philadelphia Chamber Music Society) was how much more to him is there? The answer, both from his program of Brahms, Milhaud and Bartok, and his solo CD French Portraits on Boston Records, is this: More than you could reasonably hope for. Morales isn't the only one who draws that kind of sound from that instrument, but you can count such musicians on one hand.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 15, 1993 | By Peter Dobrin, FOR THE INQUIRER
Daniel McKelway is a clarinetist with a nice sound and more than a little bit to say in the way of interesting interpretations. Playing Thursday afternoon at the Academy Ballroom Morning Musicale, he was able to blend sounds so closely with those of pianist Dena Levine that it was sometimes hard to tell where one began and the other left off. At least that was the case in the first work on the program, Debussy's Premiere rapsodie. But a few pieces later, the task was made considerably more difficult by a haggard Steinway whose pitch seemed to droop.
NEWS
June 20, 1992 | by Jim Nicholson, Daily News Staff Writer
Services were held yesterday for Harold Karabell, one of the world's premiere jazz clarinetists, who died Wednesday. He was 64 and lived in Northeast Philadelphia. Until his death, he maintained a vigorous schedule that included teaching at Temple University and in the public schools, leading the Metropole Jazz Band and playing engagements. "The greatest thing was his eclectic nature of playing anything and doing it well," local band leader John Breslin said. "Not just do it, but do it superbly.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
December 15, 2013 | By Peter Dobrin, Inquirer Music Critic
The great instrumentalists transcend the medium. In a way, Anthony McGill made the clarinet disappear at his extraordinary Philadelphia Chamber Music Society recital Thursday night with pianist Gloria Chien. It's not that he wasn't able to exploit the character of his instrument. On the contrary. But he played as if none of its inborn difficulties had ever existed. Not a hint of peril surfaced in extremely quiet sustained high notes, nor was there a split second of unease when he nailed a pitch out of nowhere.
NEWS
March 7, 2013 | By Kathleen Tinney, Inquirer Staff Writer
William F. Hyland, a New Jersey attorney general in the 1970s who argued the Karen Ann Quinlan "right-to-die" case before the state Supreme Court, fought back challenges to Atlantic City gaming in its nascence, and wailed on clarinet with Benny Goodman, died of complications of a stroke on Saturday, March 2, in Moorestown. He was 89, with a brimful resumé in public service. During a career exceeding 50 years, Mr. Hyland moved in and out of private practice. Those occasions often were commas in a lengthy list of Democratic Party posts, an elected office, and several gubernatorial appointments of increasing gravitas.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 22, 2013 | By Peter Dobrin, Inquirer Music Critic
Does it matter why we hear the musicians we do? With its deep relationships and pedagogical bloodlines, Philadelphia risks a certain provincialism and clubbiness every time an artist steps out on stage. Astral Artists, though, is a vital hedge against that dynamic, expressed most recently on Sunday afternoon at the Trinity Center in the Philadelphia recital debut of Romie de Guise-Langlois. Where we're used to hearing refinement across all registers, this clarinetist argued for variety of tone.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 16, 2013 | By David Patrick Stearns, Inquirer Music Critic
The supremacy of the violin and piano repertoire is such that we're taught not to expect much good solo stuff for instruments such as clarinet. Yet a musician of Ricardo Morales' caliber can't just live on the works written when Mozart, Brahms, and Debussy paid momentary attention to the instrument. So almost all of the music played by the Philadelphia Orchestra principal clarinetist and pianist Natalie Zhu Monday at the American Philosophical Society was new to seasoned ears - even to Jennifer Higdon, the Pulitzer Prize-winning composer who heard her 201 2 Clarinet Sonata for the first time.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 13, 2012 | By Peter Dobrin, Inquirer Music Critic
One of the best parlor games in the city right now is connecting the dots among the various string quartets that come through under the aegis of the Philadelphia Chamber Music Society. Not long ago, the Juilliard Quartet spent a heavy evening with late Beethoven at the Independence Seaport Museum, sounding pleasantly old-world and in need of renovation - depending on the moment. The Brentano Quartet's Tuesday night concert at the Perelman Theater was the seventh string quartet appearance in the society's season lineup (10 quartets to go)
NEWS
April 30, 2012
Joe Muranyi, 84, a clarinetist whose mastery of pre-World War II jazz led to a four-year stint with Louis Armstrong's last band - and to an improbable moment of pop stardom - died April 20 in Manhattan. The cause was congestive heart failure, said his daughter, Adrienne Fuss. Mr. Muranyi was among a handful of jazz musicians who began their careers in the 1950s but looked to an earlier era for inspiration. Although he once studied with the forward-thinking pianist and composer Lennie Tristano, he spent most of his career with Dixieland bands, and he was widely regarded as one of the premier clarinetists in that genre.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 6, 2012 | By Peter Dobrin, Inquirer Culture Writer
Ricardo Morales, announced in April as the New York Philharmonic's new principal clarinetist, has resigned the post before even beginning, the Philharmonic acknowledged Monday after a reporter's inquiry. "For family reasons, Mr. Morales has chosen to remain in Philadelphia, where he currently holds the position of principal clarinet with the Philadelphia Orchestra. The New York Philharmonic wishes Mr. Morales well in his future endeavors," a Philharmonic statement said. A Philadelphia Orchestra Association spokeswoman said president Allison B. Vulgamore was unavailable, and the orchestra would offer only a short statement on the matter.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 14, 2012 | By David Patrick Stearns, Inquirer Music Critic
The best day of his compositional life seemed just out of reach: On Sunday, Princeton-based composer Steve Mackey won a Grammy Award for his disc Lonely Motel , but it was for best small-ensemble performance; the classical-composition trophy, for which Lonely Motel also had been nominated, went to the opera Elmer Gantry . And in the same time slot, Chamber Orchestra of Philadelphia premiered his excellent new work, Tonic ,...
NEWS
November 17, 2010 | By David Patrick Stearns, Inquirer Music Critic
Is it reasonable to expect the Juilliard Quartet - after 65 years, nine personnel changes, and a constantly shifting zeitgeist - to play the kind of pathbreaking Bartok performances that made the group's reputation? And established the music itself as some of the century's best? Literally speaking, the answer is no. But Sunday's Philadelphia Chamber Music Society audience got the essence of Juilliard's importance in a Bartok String Quartet No. 5 performance that nearly eclipsed guest clarinetist Ricardo Morales in Brahms' Clarinet Quintet later in the program.
NEWS
May 18, 2010 | By Peter Dobrin INQUIRER MUSIC CRITIC
George Crumb is always good for a theatrical flourish or two. In his Eleven Echoes of Autumn from 1965, the violinist plays and whistles. The flutist plays and whispers simultaneously. At one point during the piece, clarinetist and flutist walk over to the open lid of a grand piano, look down into the body of the instrument as if it were a cradle or a grave, and play into the echoing abyss. Even if you didn't like what you heard at Sunday afternoon's concert of Counter)induction - no, not a typo, but a contemporary music group - you could at least be engaged visually.
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