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Clark Kent

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NEWS
June 10, 2013
Larry Tye is the author of "Superman: The High-Flying History of America's Most Enduring Hero," now out in paperback (Random House) The comics had never beheld a golden goose like him. By the end of World War II, Superman was the marquee attraction in four separate comic books and shared top billing with Batman in a fifth. Each magazine brought in just 10 cents, but a 1940s dime is today's dollar, and 3.2 million dimes were rung up every month. True Man of Tomorrow addicts could get a daily dose in the funny pages.
NEWS
June 26, 1988 | By Michael Vitez, Inquirer Staff Writer
Science-fiction writer Isaac Asimov gave the bride away, declaring the marriage "a true meeting of the minds. " The groom, ever the romantic, made the rings himself out of gold and pyrolytic carbon, the same material he used in inventing the world's most successful artificial heart. The newlyweds spent six weeks in Paris on their honeymoon, but the bride - the world's smartest woman, with an IQ of "228.333 repeating" - described it as a busman's holiday. She took her portable computer and he took his physics books.
SPORTS
October 14, 1989 | By Paul Hagen, Daily News Sports Writer Daily News wire services contributed to this report
The first rocket burst has been fired before the 1989 World Series. And it wasn't even between the San Francisco Giants and the Oakland Athletics. After a recent workout, Giants first basemen Will Clark said this about former teammate Jeffrey Leonard: "He was a tumor," Clark told the San Francisco Chronicle. "We got rid of him. Now look where we are. "He was a jealous ballplayer. He couldn't understand why a player was called up and got all the attention. So he made my life miserable.
NEWS
June 16, 1986
The word from DC Comics is that there's a new Superman brewing, a guy who's in touch with his feelings, not an emotional cripple a la Clark Kent of yesteryear. He's gonna be more "vulnerable," yet upwardly mobile. Updated, sophisticated. A cape of tangerine, perhaps? Well, we sort of liked Superman I, straight, neat, the real thing. To the geniuses at DC Comics as they tamper with a classic, four words of caution: Remember the New Coke.
NEWS
October 27, 1990
Tomorrow we "fall back" to Eastern Standard Time, giving us an extra hour to make the most of. One way is to make it a reminder to change the battery in your smoke detector. The best thing about this campaign - in which the Philadelphia Fire Department is an enthusiastic participant - is its simplicity and minimal cost. An annual battery change can save your life. ALL ABOARD! A BALL AT 30TH ST. Tonight's ninth annual Beaux Arts Ball is at 30th Street Station.
NEWS
July 25, 1987 | By Desmond Ryan, Inquirer Movie Critic
The world is teetering on the brink of nuclear war and only Superman can save it. But the big story is something even more unthinkable: The Daily Planet is going tabloid. And so, Superman IV: The Quest for Peace offers an amusing exercise in double jeopardy. While the Man of Steel is taking on Lex Luthor, arms dealers and a formidable opponent called Nuclear Man, and guiding missiles into the safety of deep space, Clark Kent has a newsroom nightmare of his own. A new publisher who makes media baron Rupert Murdoch seem like H. L. Mencken is storming through the city room and ordering up headlines that scream.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 30, 2006 | By JEROME MAIDA For the Daily News
With Superman soaring on the silver screen again after a 19-year hiatus, sales of his comic titles likely will go "Up, Up and Away. " That is the title of the arc running in the two main Superman titles - "Superman" Nos. 650-653 and "Action Comics" Nos. 837-840 - and it is a story that perfectly complements the movie. "It's very enjoyable," said "Law and Order: SVU" and comic writer Christos Gage. "It's laying the groundwork for a wealth of future stories while re-establishing the character at a perfect time, when the movie may bring in new readers.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 13, 2011 | By RICK BENTLEY, McClatchy Newspapers
LOS ANGELES - It's up, up and away for Superman. "Smallville" ends tonight after 10 seasons of stories on the transformation of mild-mannered Clark Kent (Tom Welling) into the Man of Steel. A lot can happen to a series in 10 years. The original concept behind the show was to create a program about a family dealing with a special-needs child - one who just happens to have superpowers. It ends at a much different place. Accepting people's differences became a major theme in early seasons.
NEWS
September 18, 1995 | by Ellen Gray, Daily News Staff Writer
The baby did it. The long-awaited conclusion to "The Simpsons" cliff-hanger "Who Shot Mr. Burns?" ended last night with neither a bang nor a whimper. In fact, the suspect, observing her right to remain silent, never removed the pacifier from her mouth. Yes, Maggie Simpson shot Mr. Burns. In an episode replete with red herrings and pop-culture references - we caught "Twin Peaks," "The Fugitive" and more allusions to that other Simpson, O.J., than we care to think about - TV's cleverest cartoon resolved the mystery that's kept millions arguing all summer.
NEWS
June 15, 1986 | By Richard Cohen
When I was a kid, about 6 or 7, I flew across the room. I stood on the end of my parents' bed, extended my bathrobe behind me and pushed off. I sailed through the air, cleared part of the room, and came to a remarkably soft landing by skidding to a stop under my father's chest of drawers. "Like Superman!," my sister exclaimed. That, I informed her, was the whole idea. That was the only flight for which there were witnesses. My career as Superman went largely unnoticed by the world around me. No one knew that I could fly (faster than a speeding bullet)
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NEWS
June 14, 2013 | BY GARY THOMPSON, Daily News Staff Writer thompsg@phillynews.com, 215-854-5992
SORRY, Zack Snyder, but you're not going to make me call him Hopeman. In "Man of Steel," the famously humorless director has invented a new backstory for his scowling reinvention of the DC comics hero, and it allows him to get two hours into the movie without actually using the word Superman. You wonder if Snyder thought the name too Christopher Reeve-y, too upbeat, too optimistic. So he's called his movie "Man of Steel" and in his new origins story, the "S" on the character's chest is not an "S," but a symbol that on the planet Krypton means "hope.
NEWS
June 10, 2013
Larry Tye is the author of "Superman: The High-Flying History of America's Most Enduring Hero," now out in paperback (Random House) The comics had never beheld a golden goose like him. By the end of World War II, Superman was the marquee attraction in four separate comic books and shared top billing with Batman in a fifth. Each magazine brought in just 10 cents, but a 1940s dime is today's dollar, and 3.2 million dimes were rung up every month. True Man of Tomorrow addicts could get a daily dose in the funny pages.
NEWS
July 6, 2012 | By Larry Tye
Superman just entered his 75th year, but he has always been ageless as well as timeless. In the 1930s, he was just the crime-fighter we needed to take on Al Capone and the robber barons. In the '40s, he defended the home front while brave GIs battled overseas. Early in the Cold War, he stood up taller than ever for his adopted country, while in its waning days, he tried to eliminate nuclear stockpiles single-handedly. Over the decades, the Man of Steel has evolved more than the fruit fly. For each era, he zeroed in on the threats that scared us most, using powers that grew or diminished depending on the need — as did his spectacles, his hairstyle, and even his job title.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 13, 2011 | By RICK BENTLEY, McClatchy Newspapers
LOS ANGELES - It's up, up and away for Superman. "Smallville" ends tonight after 10 seasons of stories on the transformation of mild-mannered Clark Kent (Tom Welling) into the Man of Steel. A lot can happen to a series in 10 years. The original concept behind the show was to create a program about a family dealing with a special-needs child - one who just happens to have superpowers. It ends at a much different place. Accepting people's differences became a major theme in early seasons.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 31, 2011 | By Howard Gensler
G EORGE REEVES , Christopher Reeve and Brandon Routh and a few elite others are soon to be joined in Superman lore by Englishman Henry Cavill . And one more American institution will have been taken over by the British. Cavill, 27, best known to U.S. audiences for his role on "The Tudors," will star as the man from Krypton in the next installment of the movie franchise. Warner Bros. announced the casting yesterday. The film is to be directed by "300" director Zack Snyder , who said in a statement that Cavill is "the perfect choice to don the cape and 'S' shield.
NEWS
July 17, 2006 | By Kathleen Parker
If you haven't seen Superman Returns and want to be surprised by the latest, if somewhat obvious, story twist, don't read this column. Otherwise, consider yourself warned. Much has been written about the scriptwriters' decision to delete Uncle Sam from the Superman triune: truth, justice and the American way. In the latest version, Superman represents "truth, justice and . . . all that stuff," as Daily Planet editor Perry White puts it. Some critics have been deeply offended by the extraction of American exceptionalism from this quintessentially American superhero and take it as yet another manifestation of lefty Hollywood's self-loathing.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 30, 2006 | By JEROME MAIDA For the Daily News
With Superman soaring on the silver screen again after a 19-year hiatus, sales of his comic titles likely will go "Up, Up and Away. " That is the title of the arc running in the two main Superman titles - "Superman" Nos. 650-653 and "Action Comics" Nos. 837-840 - and it is a story that perfectly complements the movie. "It's very enjoyable," said "Law and Order: SVU" and comic writer Christos Gage. "It's laying the groundwork for a wealth of future stories while re-establishing the character at a perfect time, when the movie may bring in new readers.
NEWS
June 20, 2006 | By Hugh Hart FOR THE INQUIRER
The first time Brandon Routh saw Superman, he got a headache. "I was born the year after Superman: The Movie came out, so I watched it on television when I was 5 or 6 years old," recalls the 6-foot-3 actor. "I wore my Superman pajamas and a little cape, and was so excited to see the movie that I gave myself a migraine headache and got sick to my stomach. I was pretty darned excited, lying on my side, watching the movie through the stomach pain. It was something big and something special.
NEWS
January 10, 2003 | By Nick Schulz
Clark Kent is the latest symbol of the disruptive power of capitalism. His superhero cocoon, the phone booth, is becoming extinct. The life and imminent death of the phone booth come at the hands of the dynamic capitalist process that the great economist Joseph Schumpeter called "creative destruction. " The creation of the modern cell phone system is destroying the phone booth. A functioning global cellular network has finally emerged, and, for better or worse, society has moved past the point where it is considered rude to hold a private conversation in public.
SPORTS
November 8, 1996 | By Michael Rosenberg, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Kevin Sinclair is one of the best running backs in South Jersey history. On this, you will have to trust the numbers and observers. You won't hear it from Sinclair, who is to brash what Michael Jackson is to down-to-earth. Wearing glasses and a collared shirt, Sinclair appears as quiet as he actually is. And, off the field, about the only thing animated about him is his favorite movie: The Lion King. "I like the music," Sinclair said of the Disney box-office hit. No, this is not your average football star.
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