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Class Action

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NEWS
March 26, 1992 | By Martha Woodall, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
A federal judge will not reconsider his decision limiting the scope of the American Civil Liberties Union's child-welfare suit in U.S. District Court. In a suit filed in April 1990 against Philadelphia and Pennsylvania officials, the ACLU and its New York-based Children's Rights Project sought to overhaul Philadelphia's child-welfare system. The ACLU had hoped for a class action. But in January, Judge Robert F. Kelly said the suit could apply only to the 16 children named as plaintiffs.
NEWS
July 11, 2003
IN THE real world, Pennsylvania has a huge budget deficit. In the real world, Harrisburg has shown little appetite for school funding. In the real world, the status quo needs to change in Philadelphia schools. State Rep. Jewell Williams is not living in this real world. We don't know what Matrix-inspired dream the representative is in, but he should snap out of it. He and supporters may believe that protesting against school CEO Paul Vallas' plan to consolidate 10 Comprehensive Early Learning Centers will help protect the education of roughly 400 children.
NEWS
March 2, 2010 | By Dan Hardy INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
A group of Lower Merion and Harriton High School parents will meet tonight to discuss ways to derail the possibility that a federal lawsuit over laptop spying could lead to a lengthy and expensive class-action case against their district. Bryn Mawr resident Michael Boni, one of the organizers, said yesterday: "We have spoken to our neighbors and friends, and it seemed that there was a groundswell of opposition to one family with one lawyer bringing this action on behalf of the community.
NEWS
August 26, 1997 | by Jim Smith, Daily News Staff Writer
A federal judge ruled yesterday that six Philadelphia-area cigarette smokers could sue tobacco companies to force them to provide costly medical monitoring for some 2 million smokers in Pennsylvania. Reversing a decision he made in June, U.S. District Judge Clarence C. Newcomer certified the case, Barnes vs. American Tobacco Co., as a class action and set a trial date for the fall - the nation's next major tobacco showdown. The class includes "all current residents of Pennsylvania who are cigarette smokers as of Dec. 1, 1996, and who began smoking before age 19, while they were residents of Pennsylvania," the judge said.
NEWS
May 10, 2000 | By Jennifer Moroz, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
An appellate court panel has denied the request of defense lawyers in the Lipari Landfill case to appeal the class-action status of the lawsuit. The decision, made Tuesday by Judges Michael P. King and Jack L. Lintner, came three months after a Gloucester County Superior Court judge agreed with plaintiffs' lawyers that two classes of people could have been exposed to emissions from the Mantua Township landfill, which once topped the national Superfund list. If the case is successful, the two groups, totaling at least 1,600 people, would be eligible for medical monitoring to identify any harm from the exposure.
NEWS
April 17, 1986 | By Rich Heidorn Jr., Inquirer Staff Writer
Federal lawsuits filed by 71 people whose houses were destroyed or damaged in the May 13 MOVE fire have been joined into a class action by U.S. District Judge Louis H. Pollak, despite the objections of the city and more than three-fourths of the plaintiffs. In an opinion filed yesterday, Pollak ruled that the class will include the owners and residents of the 26 houses who have filed suit seeking civil damages for their losses in federal court and of the 34 houses who have not filed suit.
BUSINESS
November 7, 2012 | By Greg Stohr, Bloomberg News
WASHINGTON - Two class-action disputes divided the U.S. Supreme Court on Monday as companies looked to build on the victory won last year when the justices threw out a nationwide sex-bias suit against Wal-Mart Stores Inc. The court's Republican-appointed majority questioned separate efforts to press an antitrust suit against Comcast Corp., the nation's largest cable-television company, and a securities-fraud case targeting Amgen Inc., the world's...
BUSINESS
July 17, 2003 | By Joseph A. Slobodzian INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
A federal judge has approved as a class action a civil-rights lawsuit filed two years ago against Sunoco Inc. by African American professional employees in the region who contend that the company has blocked avenues to promotion. While not commenting on the lawsuit's merits, U.S. District Judge Clifford Scott Green wrote that the plaintiffs' analysis of Sunoco's regional employment statistics is sufficient to approve the case as a class action and let it move toward trial. Sunoco spokesman Gerald Davis said company officials would meet with lawyers representing the firm to discuss how to respond to the ruling.
NEWS
June 22, 2011
By Walter Olson In the run-up to the Supreme Court's opinion this week in Wal-Mart v. Dukes , the Ninth Circuit U.S. Court of Appeals had given the go-ahead to a lawsuit on behalf of a vast number of female Wal-Mart employees, each of whom had supposedly suffered harm as a result of the giant retailer's way of doing business. In the minds of some advocates, the only question remaining was whether the Supreme Court would stand in the way of justice. Prejudging Wal-Mart's guilt without so much as a trial, the left-leaning Alliance for Justice asked: "Will the Supreme Court Protect Wal-Mart's Discrimination Against Women?"
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NEWS
April 30, 2015 | BY DANA DiFILIPPO, Daily News Staff Writer difilid@phillynews.com, 215-854-5934
THE MOTHER of a man killed by police during a December car stop in Frankford filed a class-action lawsuit today on behalf of all citizens abused by Philadelphia police. The lawsuit, filed by Tanya Brown-Dickerson, mother of Brandon Tate-Brown, asks a judge to order the reforms recommended in a recent federal Justice Department report and appoint an administrator to ensure compliance. The Justice Department report, released last month, found that police had shot, on average, 49 people a year since 2007.
BUSINESS
December 14, 2014 | By Bob Fernandez, Inquirer Staff Writer
A federal judge in Philadelphia on Friday approved a $50 million settlement that brings a decadelong consumer class-action lawsuit against Comcast Corp. closer to closure. Judge John R. Padova's preliminary decision entitles about 800,000 current and former Comcast cable-TV subscribers in Bucks, Chester, Delaware, and Montgomery Counties and Philadelphia to $15 in credits, or Comcast services valued at $30 to $43.90, according to court documents. Those services include temporary Internet upgrades, six free pay-per-view movies, or two free months of the Movie Channel.
BUSINESS
November 21, 2014 | By Jeff Gelles, Inquirer Staff Writer
A lawsuit filed this week in federal court in Philadelphia joins a series of class actions seeking to hold Japan's Takata Corp. and major automakers financially responsible for defective air-bag inflators that can send shrapnel flying with explosive force. Filed Tuesday by the Philadelphia from Anapol Schwartz, the suit says the threat of injury continues to jeopardize millions of people who own or lease cars equipped with the air bags. Five U.S. deaths have now been linked to the defect, and the suit says it has been blamed in at least 139 injuries.
BUSINESS
October 31, 2014 | By David Sell and Bob Fernandez, Inquirer Staff Writers
Comcast Corp. has agreed to pay $50 million in cash and services to settle a 10-year-old class-action lawsuit that alleged the cable operator overcharged customers in the Philadelphia region, according to court documents. In a filing in U.S. District Court in Philadelphia, Comcast said it did not agree with the plaintiffs' assertions of fact and law but would agree to the proposed payments, pending approval by U.S. Judge John R. Padova. Reuters first reported the settlement. The first version of the suit was filed in 2003 by a group of Comcast customers who thought the cable giant was misusing its dominant position in the Philadelphia area and other markets.
NEWS
August 24, 2014 | By Angelo Fichera, Inquirer Staff Writer
While the 2012 Paulsboro train derailment and chemical spill - which forced hundreds from their homes and businesses - may have appeared ripe for a mass lawsuit, a federal judge has ruled against certifying a case as a class action. The decision this week by U.S. District Judge Robert B. Kugler not only reflects the fragmented legal approach by those affected by the accident, but also the increasingly stringent standards to achieve class status. The Nov. 30, 2012, derailment occurred over the Mantua Creek when an 82-car freight train crossed the East Jefferson Street Bridge, despite a warning light.
SPORTS
November 7, 2013 | By Thomas Mahon, Inquirer Staff Writer
Ten minutes elapsed before Downingtown East's Linnea Faccenda scored her first goal. The senior finished a hat trick by the 23d minute on her way to five goals that sent the Cougars to a 5-1 win over Dover in a PIAA state Class AAA first-round girls' soccer game Tuesday night. Faccenda tallied four scores in the first half, and Downingtown East coach Craig Reed praised his star striker. "At the point she had her hat trick, she had only taken four shots," Reed said. "She has had an excellent season.
NEWS
March 28, 2013 | By Bob Fernandez, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
A divided U.S. Supreme Court ruled in favor of Comcast Corp. in a class-action lawsuit involving Philadelphia cable-TV customers who claimed they'd been harmed by the company's anti-competitive business practices. The decision overturned a decision by the Philadelphia federal courts to certify about two million Comcast cable-TV customers as a class to sue the cable company for $875 million in damages. Justice Antonin Scalia wrote the opinion. He was joined by Justices John Roberts, Anthony Kennedy, Clarence Thomas and Samuel Alito.
NEWS
February 8, 2013
TWO YEARS after a monstrous blaze tore through a West Philadelphia apartment building, leaving hundreds homeless, the tenants have been given approval by Common Pleas Court to file a class-action lawsuit against the building's owners. It took 140 firefighters to extinguish the five-alarm blaze that engulfed the four-story Windermere Court apartments, on 48th street near Walnut, in January 2011. The tenants are seeking monetary compensation for damages, claiming that the building's owners, brothers David, Sam and Aron Ginsberg, of Keystone Management Group, were negligent by failing to install a functioning fire-alarm and sprinkler system.
NEWS
January 11, 2013 | By Jennifer Lin, Inquirer Staff Writer
At the federal courthouse, the class action lawsuit for tenants of the Philadelphia Housing Authority was seen as the case that wouldn't end. But after 15 years, McDowell v. PHA could be nearing a close. The sides have reached a preliminary agreement that calls for the authority to set aside $2.65 million to settle claims from tenants who say they were not receiving adequate home-heating subsidies when natural gas rates increased. PHA also has agreed to cover $730,000 in legal fees for the plaintiffs' lawyers at Community Legal Services.
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