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Class Clown

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ENTERTAINMENT
August 1, 1997 | By Jack Lloyd, FOR THE INQUIRER
Beverly Wines' father did not quite share her enthusiasm when she returned home from high school one day and proudly announced that she had just been voted the "class humorist. " "You know what that means, don't you?" she quoted him as saying. "That means you're the class clown, the class jerk. " The young woman was not discouraged. "Well, I was still pretty happy," she said. "I mean, there were 400 in my class. " And so Beverly Wines went on to become Pudgy! That's right, Pudgy!
ENTERTAINMENT
October 30, 2009 | By Monica Peters FOR THE INQUIRER
Kids can enjoy a special treat on Halloween morning as ArtsPower returns with the children's production Jigsaw Jones: The Case of the Class Clown, at the Keswick Theatre. The production at 11 a.m. is based on the Jigsaw children's book series by author James Preller. The plot is based on middle- school student Athena Lorenzo, who has been slimed and doesn't think it's very funny. Someone in Mrs. Gleason's class has been playing practical jokes. It's up to junior sleuth Theodore "Jigsaw" Jones and his trusty assistant, Mila, to crack the case.
NEWS
March 14, 1993 | For The Inquirer / JON ADAMS
Author Joanna Hurwitz fields questions from third graders at the Tawanka Elementary School in Middletown during a recent visit. The author of children's books addressed two assembly programs at the school on the art of writing, then visited individual classrooms for discussion. Among her books, which deal with the everyday lives of children, are "Class Clown" and "Russell Sprouts".
NEWS
September 9, 1988 | By Joe Clark, Daily News Staff Writer
Sister Theresa's "class clown" is absent today. Her memory, however, is present. So chances are that when Sister Theresa's sixth-graders reported for the first day of school this morning at Ascension of Our Lord School, F Street and Westmoreland Avenue, they paused for a moment and said a few prayers for their absent classmate who liked to make people laugh. For almost a month now, Dawn Holloran, 11, has been lying in a coma in the intensive-care unit of St. Christopher's Hospital for Children.
NEWS
November 2, 2000 | by Harry S. Gross
If all the issues in the current campaign, four stand out: The makeup of the Supreme Court, Social Security and Medicare, education and the economy. The next president will make two, and perhaps three or more, appointments to the Supreme Court. That could set the tone of the court for many years beyond that president's term. George Bush has said that he most admires Justices Scalia and Thomas. Thomas has shown himself to be little more than a clone of Scalia. Does the nation really want a court that reflects the views of the far right in such areas as civil rights and abortion?
ENTERTAINMENT
May 22, 1989 | By Barbara Beck, Daily News Staff Writer
There'll be something funny going on at International House. It's laughter, pure unadulterated belly laughs. And chuckling, snorting, gasping . . . nonstop. Comic/juggler/acrobat/mime/dog Fred Garbo, a one-man Marx Brothers, launches his act Wednesday as part of the five-day Philadelphia International Theatre Festival for Children at the University of Pennsylvania. The festival is one of the theatrical highlights of the season. Garbo's shtick is first and foremost 50 minutes of pure fooling around, from bungled unicycle riding to simple juggling and clowning.
NEWS
February 6, 1999 | By S. Joseph Hagenmayer, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
William T. "Bill" Naulty, 67, a salesman and storyteller, died Wednesday at Virtua-West Jersey Hospital Camden from emphysema. An Audubon resident since his early childhood, he was born in Mount Ephraim. Mr. Naulty was a real estate broker for nearly a decade before becoming ill about nine years ago. He worked in sales throughout his career. He was a Korean War Marine Corps veteran, serving in Japan and in the Mediterranean. A red-haired Irishman, Mr. Naulty was known more for his storytelling, his great Irish wit, and his ability to bring a smile to the faces of his many friends, said Mary Ann Naulty, his wife of 46 years and a longtime Inquirer advertising representative in the South Jersey office.
NEWS
July 18, 1997 | By Stephanie Brenowitz, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Mike Kollmansberger was such a smart aleck as a teenager, his mother used to dread going to parent-teacher conferences at Cherry Hill East. "A lot of his teachers would tell me he has an attitude problem or that he talks back too much," said Doris Black. "Apparently, they didn't get his sense of humor. " But now, Mom is proud to say, her son has found something else to do with his sixth sense besides annoy his teachers. Kollmansberger is a comedian, performing weekly in top-name clubs in New York City and around the country.
SPORTS
August 28, 1996 | By Eric Karabell, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
When Rob Crozier began his sophomore year at Truman, the Tigers were coming off another winless season, and for Crozier, playing the game was mainly for fun. Winning hardly ever happened, so it couldn't be expected. How things have changed. Crozier is now a senior, and Truman has become a respected program. It is coming off a surprising 7-4 season, its first winning year since Delhaas and Woodrow Wilson merged to form the school in 1981. Football remains fun, but there's more on the line now. And nobody epitomizes the sharp maturation in the Truman football program better than Crozier.
NEWS
August 27, 1999 | by Pateen Corcoran, For the Daily News
Eighteen years ago, sixth-grader Jamie Kennedy ("Scream," "As Good as It Gets," "Enemy of the State") was munching on popcorn in Upper Darby's Terminal movie theater while watching Eddie Murphy on the big screen. "I saw him in '48 Hours' and I thought he was really funny," said Kennedy. "But I never dreamt that some day I would get to work with him. " These days, however, Kennedy and Murphy are sharing scenes in movie theaters across the nation. In his most recent role, Kennedy works side by side with Murphy and Steve Martin in "Bowfinger," playing Martin's sidekick Dave, who assists him in making an unconventional film.
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SPORTS
February 6, 2012 | BY TED SILARY, silaryt@phillynews.com
NOT TOO MANY years ago, she might have mistaken a basketball for a pumpkin. Now, Jamal Nwaniemeka says his mother, Erika, "is like my second coach. " You know how Conwell-Egan High is in Fairless Hills/Levittown and Saint Joseph's University is in the Wynnefield section of West Philly? Well, Nwaniemeka attends the first and lives moments from the second and his mother, who works near C-E, is his chauffeur. That leaves lots of times for hoop talk. "When I started playing, my mom didn't know a thing about basketball," said Nwaniemeka, a 6-2, 180-pound senior wing guard.
NEWS
February 5, 2012 | BY TED SILARY, silaryt@phillynews.com
NOT TOO MANY years ago, she might have mistaken a basketball for a pumpkin. Now, Jamal Nwaniemeka says his mother, Erika, "is like my second coach. " You know how Conwell-Egan High is in Fairless Hills/Levittown and Saint Joseph's University is in the Wynnefield section of West Philly? Well, Nwaniemeka attends the first and lives moments from the second and his mother, who works near C-E, is his chauffeur. That leaves lots of times for hoop talk. "When I started playing, my mom didn't know a thing about basketball," said Nwaniemeka, a 6-2, 180-pound senior wing guard.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 12, 2011 | By Tirdad Derakhshani, Inquirer Staff Writer
Four months in the big house under the gaze of overworked guards and violent inmates? Pshaw! Lindsay Lohan , 24, won't have to deal with any of that. The Mean Girls star on Wednesday brokered a deal - through her lawyer - pleading guilty to stealing a $2,500 necklace. Judge Stephanie Sautner gifted LiLo with 120 days in jail and 60 days of community service. Last month, LiLo got another 120-day jail sentence for parole violation from her pesky '07 DUI conviction.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 30, 2009 | By Monica Peters FOR THE INQUIRER
Kids can enjoy a special treat on Halloween morning as ArtsPower returns with the children's production Jigsaw Jones: The Case of the Class Clown, at the Keswick Theatre. The production at 11 a.m. is based on the Jigsaw children's book series by author James Preller. The plot is based on middle- school student Athena Lorenzo, who has been slimed and doesn't think it's very funny. Someone in Mrs. Gleason's class has been playing practical jokes. It's up to junior sleuth Theodore "Jigsaw" Jones and his trusty assistant, Mila, to crack the case.
NEWS
January 13, 2009 | By A.D. Amorosi FOR THE INQUIRER
Forget the age-old curiosity about whether the chicken came before the egg. When considering the current career path of South Philly's Adam Gertler, one must ask, what came first - the yuks or the yolks? "The weather in Philly is surely better than it is here," Gertler jokes from sunny Los Angeles. Gertler, 31, is in L.A. putting postproduction touches on his first television series, Will Work for Food. Debuting next week on the Food Network, the show teams Gertler with unique workers of the industry.
NEWS
October 5, 2004 | By David Hiltbrand INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Pop Lit America (The Book) By "The Daily Show With Jon Stewart" 240 pp., $24.95 Not content with their nightly skewering of current events on Comedy Central, Jon Stewart and the other writers of The Daily Show have taken on a bigger target in America (The Book): lampooning all of U.S. history. Masquerading as a high school textbook (right down to the authentic "This Book is the Property of:" box stamped on the inside flap), America is the wildest civics lesson you'll ever get. It's full of hilariously apocryphal information, including the assertion that in 1978 President Jimmy Carter nominated NBA scoring machine George "The Iceman" Gervin to the Supreme Court in an "attempt to fundamentally alter the make-up of the Court by adding size, athleticism, and a patented 'finger roll' . . . Ultimately the vacancy was filled by Ruth 'Chocolate Thunder' Ginsberg.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 7, 2002 | By Addam Schwartz INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
What do you call a school where everyone's a class clown? If you're a teacher, you call it a nightmare. But if you're a comedy-club impresario, you call it a success. The Comedy Cabaret chain runs a humor workshop and comedy class, while Steve and Dolly Garber, who own two area clubs, operate the Comedy College. Forget about an apple for the teacher. In keeping with the slapstick tradition, make it a banana peel. So who shows up for Wisecracking 101? A bunch of middle-aged guys in Groucho glasses, tugging their neckties in best Rodney Dangerfield style?
NEWS
February 8, 2001 | By S. Joseph Hagenmayer, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Joint services for Frank H. Johnson Jr. and Catherine M. Fruggiero Johnson, the Medford Lakes couple killed Sunday in a plane crash in Bluffton, S.C., will be conducted tomorrow. The couple lived in Marlton before moving to Medford Lakes 10 years ago. Mr. Johnson, 54, had been the owner and manager of Frank H. Johnson Jr. Construction Services Inc. in Hammonton for the last 14 years. The business built prefabricated metal buildings. The firm's success was the result of Mr. Johnson's "hard work, long hours and his ability to think ahead," said Carl Yellin, a longtime friend.
NEWS
November 2, 2000 | by Harry S. Gross
If all the issues in the current campaign, four stand out: The makeup of the Supreme Court, Social Security and Medicare, education and the economy. The next president will make two, and perhaps three or more, appointments to the Supreme Court. That could set the tone of the court for many years beyond that president's term. George Bush has said that he most admires Justices Scalia and Thomas. Thomas has shown himself to be little more than a clone of Scalia. Does the nation really want a court that reflects the views of the far right in such areas as civil rights and abortion?
LIVING
April 26, 2000 | By Karen Heller, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Like all good superheroes, Captain Underpants flies around in skimpy attire, wears a cape, and flashes a superbly toothy smile. He's built like a toddler, dumb as a post. By day, he doubles as Mr. Krupp, Jerome Horwitz Elementary's semi-evil principal and the nemesis of the book's true heroes, champion cutups George Beard and Harold Hutchins, who suffer from IBSS (Incredibly Boring School Syndrome). This is the work of Dav Pilkey, author of the new series Ricky Ricotta's Giant Robot, and illustrator of the Dumb Bunnies books.
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