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Class Size

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NEWS
May 12, 1988 | By Yvette Ousley, Special to The Inquirer
After lengthy discussion over the issue of class size at Monday's work session, the Great Valley school board's nine members informally decided among themselves against writing a policy that would put a cap on class sizes. Board President George Sees listed a number of what he called "perceptions" about the class-size issue - ranging from an idea that class sizes at Sugartown Elementary School were deliberately set at 29 to the idea that money was not in issue. He and other board members then sought to clear up some of these matters.
NEWS
May 25, 2012 | By Jeff Gammage and Rita Giordano, INQUIRER STAFF WRITERS
For years, teachers and parents have insisted that smaller class sizes are crucial to kids' educational success. On Thursday, Mitt Romney visited Philadelphia and politely said they were mistaken. And on Friday, passions erupted - among partisans and professionals, from city classrooms to City Hall to Cherry Hill. "Out of touch with reality," Mayor Nutter fumed about the presumptive GOP nominee. "Just plain wrong," said Steve Baker, spokesman for the New Jersey teachers union.
NEWS
August 30, 2001
THERE IS no more convenient whipping boy for critics of failing public schools than the teachers unions. People who can't agree on anything else in the public school debate agree that the teachers unions are part of the problem because they care more about teachers than they do about teaching. But the one thing that teachers unions have been consistently right about is the value of smaller classes. So, it's no surprise that the Philadelphia Federation of Teachers' was the first voice heard when the Philadelphia School District announced plans to relieve a shortage of substitute teachers in a way that could increase class size.
NEWS
December 4, 1997 | By Cynthia J. McGroarty, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
When teachers and the William Penn school board were stalled in lengthy negotiations that led to a strike last year, one of the sticking points was class size. Growing enrollment was crowding classrooms, teachers said, hurting the quality of education in the district. But there was no money or space for the additional classrooms and staff that the teachers wanted, the school board said. Only by agreeing to set up a class-size committee that would make recommendations for solving the problem did the two sides settle the issue.
NEWS
March 11, 1998 | By Jen Gomez, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
When it comes to class size in public schools, most everyone agrees smaller is better at the primary level. It's no different at the Wissahickon School District. At a Monday night meeting, a 23-member committee proposed that even smaller classes be permitted in kindergarten through third grade. Under current administrative guidelines, kindergarten classes are limited to 22 students, and first through third grade to 25. The committee recommended new class-size guidelines that include the same maximums but also establish minimums: Kindergarten and first grade: 18 to 22 students.
NEWS
April 6, 2001 | By Dale Mezzacappa INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
A state regulatory board yesterday approved rules that some parents and teachers say could curtail services for many of the 220,000 special-education students across Pennsylvania. Among other changes, the regulations would allow districts to eliminate class-size limits for such things as resource room work, during which mildly disabled students get extra help. "Under current regulations, eight kids could come to a resource room at a time," said Liz Stanley-Swope of the Pennsylvania State Education Association, which opposed the new rules.
NEWS
June 4, 1999 | By Dale Mezzacappa, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Instead of approving vouchers, Pennsylvania legislators should invest at least $50 million to reduce class size in the most impoverished school districts, according to a report released yesterday by a Harrisburg think tank. The analysis of class-size experiments in Tennessee and Wisconsin, sponsored by the Keystone Research Center - which is partially funded by the state's teachers' unions - showed that poor students who were in classes of no more than 15 students in kindergarten through grade three continued to benefit academically through high school.
NEWS
June 1, 1998 | By Shelly Yanoff
In Pennsylvania today, a lot of time and energy is being used to talk about public education - from arguing about governance and budgets to threats to close or take over the schools. You might think there was no agreement about what works in public education or that people everywhere disagree about the importance of smaller class size, better trained teachers, schools that are safe and provide enough books and computers to prepare students for their future and that are accountable for the education they provide and the funding they receive.
NEWS
January 30, 1992 | By Michelle R. Davis, SPECIAL TO THE INQUIRER
Parents of Coopertown Elementary students are worried that increased class size will prevent their children from learning, they told the Haverford Township school board at the board's meeting last Thursday night. First-grade class size at the school has increased nearly a third - from under 20 students in last year's classes to 27 students in some classes this year. "It is a teacher-to-student ratio that is not the best for the children," said Fran Peltier, former president of the Coopertown Parent-Teacher Organization.
NEWS
November 13, 1986 | By David Lieber, Inquirer Staff Writer
A group of parents of children enrolled in the Learning Disabled class at Cedarbrook Middle School has succeeded in temporarily blocking a move by the Cheltenham School District to seek state permission to establish a larger- than-allowed class size. Currently, there are 17 students in the class - two more than the state allows. Acting Superintendent Joseph C. Kircher Jr. had wanted to apply to the state Department of Education for permission to increase the maximum from 15 to 17. After hearing the opposing comments of parents of 11 children in the class of 17, the school board voted 9-0 Tuesday to table Kircher's recommendation.
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SPORTS
May 12, 2015 | BY MARK PERNER, Daily News Staff Writer pernerm@phillynews.com
WHAT IS THIS academic world coming to? Tom Brady gets caught with his air compressor on so now they're going to be teaching a four-credit course on "Deflategate" at the University of New Hampshire. UNH sports law professor Michael McCann designed the course, which according to its description, will be about "the interplay between those footballs . . . and the legal, regulatory and journalistic systems governing sports. " So, got to thinking: If courses can be offered in that, why not have some Philadelphia sports officials teach a course?
NEWS
September 16, 2013
Success in numbers I had to smile while reading about Andrew Jackson School in South Philadelphia, where teachers expressed consternation at having to deal with classes of 32 to 36 students. In the mid- to late 1950s, I attended a Philadelphia parochial school where class size regularly approached 90 students, and my fourth-grade class actually had 101 children. How did our teachers, the Sisters of the Immaculate Heart of Mary and a small contingent of young, dedicated lay teachers, manage?
NEWS
September 12, 2013 | By Susan Snyder and Michaelle Bond, Inquirer Staff Writers
When Philadelphia School Superintendent William R. Hite Jr. showed up unannounced Tuesday morning at Andrew Jackson School, principal Lisa Ciaranca Kaplan asked: "Am I in trouble?" The South Philadelphia school, hit with large class sizes, was featured in an Inquirer article Tuesday on how Kaplan and teachers grappled with those classes, including one with 36 first graders. Hite, however, hadn't come to lower the boom. He had talked to Kaplan last week about class size concerns, and Jackson was one of the schools on his radar to visit, he said.
NEWS
June 26, 2013 | By Martha Woodall, Inquirer Staff Writer
Amid widespread concern over school-funding cuts, a majority of Pennsylvania voters would be willing to pay higher taxes to reverse them, a poll released Monday said. The statewide poll said 78 percent of those questioned were concerned about public school funding, 48 percent "very concerned. " The rates were higher for women, with 85 percent expressing concern for schools and 55 percent saying they were "very concerned. " Overall, 55 percent of respondents said that they believed the schools were in crisis and that Gov. Corbett and the Republican-controlled legislature should act to prevent staff from being laid off, programs ended, and class sizes increased.
NEWS
March 4, 2013 | By Will Weissert, Associated Press
FORT HOOD, Texas - Public schools everywhere will be affected by the government's automatic budget cuts, but few may feel the funding pinch faster than those on and around military bases. School districts with military ties from coast to coast are bracing for increased class sizes and delayed building repairs. Others already have axed sports teams and even eliminated teaching positions, but still may have to tap savings just to make it through year's end. But there's little hope for softening any future financial blows.
NEWS
November 19, 2012 | BY LISA HAVER
I HADN'T SEEN Vince's son in years. He had grown into a charming, intelligent and articulate high-school senior. His father wants him to work on Wall Street but he's always dreamed of becoming a teacher. Teaching is a wonderful profession, I told him. Sure, you'll make more money in finance, but you'll never feel the satisfaction of working with young people and making a difference in their lives. On the other hand, it seems that the days of being admired and valued for dedicating yourself to the education of young people may be over.
NEWS
June 4, 2012 | Inquirer Editorial
It was no surprise that educators at a West Philadelphia charter school challenged Republican presidential candidate Mitt Romney's statement that class size has no impact on student achievement.   His assertion isn't supported by most research, and it is the widely held belief of generations of parents and teachers that class size matters when it comes to learning. Many schools — including the private academy where Romney sends his children, which advertises an average class size of 12 students — have long touted small class sizes as a selling point.
NEWS
May 27, 2012 | By Jeff Gammage and Rita Giordano, Inquirer Staff Writers
For years, teachers and parents have insisted that smaller class sizes are crucial to children's educational success. On Thursday, Mitt Romney visited Philadelphia and politely said they were mistaken. And on Friday, passions erupted among partisans and professionals, from city classrooms to City Hall to Cherry Hill. "Out of touch with reality," Mayor Nutter fumed about the presumptive GOP nominee. "Just plain wrong," said Steve Baker, spokesman for the New Jersey teachers' union.
NEWS
May 26, 2012 | By Miriam Hill, Inquirer Staff Writer
Republican presidential candidate Mitt Romney brought his plan to improve the American educational system to a West Philadelphia charter school Thursday, and suggested class size mattered little to pupils' achievement. Whereupon the teachers in the room immediately questioned his stance. Calling the gap in education performance between black and white students "the civil rights issue of our time," Romney said quality teaching and parental involvement were the keys to classroom success.
NEWS
May 25, 2012 | By Miriam Hill, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Republican presidential candidate Mitt Romney brought his plan to improve the American educational system to a West Philadelphia charter school Thursday, and suggested class size mattered little to pupils' achievement. Whereupon the teachers in the room immediately questioned his stance. Calling the gap in education performance between black and white students "the civil rights issue of our time," Romney said quality teaching and parental involvement were the keys to classroom success.
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