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Class Warfare

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NEWS
March 27, 1992 | CLAYTON YEUTTER, From the New York Times
Class warfare, discredited throughout the former Communist world, seems to have found new life in American political circles. A front-page article in the March 5 New York Times described one example: An allegation that the recovery of the 1980s - and hence the conservative philosophy of the Bush administration - helped the rich and hurt the poor. This analysis, a reprise of the so-called fairness argument, rests on a Congressional Budget Office study and an analysis by a Massachusetts Institute of Technology economist, Paul Krugman.
NEWS
June 21, 2006 | Paul Krugman
Paul Krugman is a columnist for the New York Times In case you haven't noticed, modern American politics is marked by vicious partisanship, with the great bulk of the viciousness coming from the right. It's clear that the Republican plan for the 2006 election is, once again, to question Democrats' patriotism. But do Republican leaders truly believe that they are serious about fighting terrorism, while Democrats aren't? When the speaker of the House declares that "we in this Congress must show the same steely resolve as those men and women on United Flight 93," is that really the way he sees himself?
BUSINESS
March 20, 2011 | By Joseph N. DiStefano, Inquirer Staff Writer
Andy Kessler - a former AT&T engineer, Silicon Valley stock analyst, and hedge fund manager - writes lively accounts of the working rich, and the ideas percolating on the edges of the U.S. economy, where the action is. His first-person books Running Money and Wall Street Meat took apart the dot.com bubble and its villains. How We Got Here gave a glib, quick-hit history of tech. The End of Medicine predicts that new devices and diagnostics will put a lot of doctors out of business.
NEWS
March 2, 2009
BRACE yourself: Joe the Plumber may be staging a comeback. The troubled poster boy for class warfare, canonized by Republican presidential candidate John McCain during the campaign, must surely be waiting for an entrance cue, given how many times the threat of "class warfare" has been raised last week. The threat was prompted by Barack Obama's budget, which rewrites "a legacy of misplaced priorities" and raises taxes for the wealthiest Americans. Joe made his sad plight known when he asked Obama on the campaign trail if he'd be paying higher taxes after he expanded his business and started making over $250,000.
NEWS
January 8, 2003 | By E.J. Dionne
Be wary. By offering certain facts here, I may, according to President Bush, make myself guilty of "class warfare. " The President is proposing an economic "stimulus" plan that will certainly stimulate the very wealthiest Americans. Its centerpiece will be an end to taxes on dividends, which will cost the government about $300 billion over the next decade. It happens, according to Citizens for Tax Justice, that roughly half that money would go to people earning more than $350,000 a year, to the top 1 percent of Americans.
NEWS
September 25, 2011 | By Harold Jackson, Editor of the Editorial Page
Growing up poor isn't so bad. Most poor kids don't even notice it, since it's unlikely that their friends and neighbors are doing any better. But being accustomed to poverty doesn't excuse its existence. As a child, it never struck me as anything other than normal that my brothers and I wore patched jeans. I didn't care, but in retrospect I know my mother did. She took the time to sew the patches on the inside of our pants and used a darning technique to make the patchwork less visible.
NEWS
August 22, 2000
Apparently, when people listen for themselves, they hear things the press doesn't. Most pundits panned Vice President Al Gore's acceptance speech Thursday night, ridiculing his speeded-up speaking style and his "laundry list" of specific programs and promises. But the viewing public must have seen the speech differently. Some voters even said they didn't find Gore boring. Whatever you make of that judgment, a few days later, the polls say that Gore has made up a double-digit gap between him and Republican candidate George Bush.
BUSINESS
May 30, 1993 | By David Johnston, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The balding man stepped up to the podium and with the fervor of a tent revivalist preached his gospel: "Fire in the belly! That's what you've got to have - fire in the belly! "It's an honorable thing to do to help poor people, to help working mothers get a health plan for their kids and a paid vacation. "To get that, you are going to have to get out there early in the morning and be dressed well. Saturday and Sunday, too. You have to look for live wires, and a lot of the most live-wire people you meet will be churchgoers.
NEWS
May 21, 1993 | By Jodi Enda, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Watergate it ain't. Nonetheless, New Jersey gubernatorial hopeful Jim Wallwork has accused one of his opponents of engaging in a form of dirty campaigning. By talking dirty. Republican frontrunner Christine Todd Whitman, according to Wallwork's campaign, has stooped to using "vulgar" language to describe the tactics of Wallwork and the third major GOP candidate, Cary Edwards. Whitman "continually promotes herself as the victim of class warfare," Wallwork's campaign manager, retired Anthony J. Adessa, a retired Army colonel, wrote yesterday in a letter to the editor of The Bernardsville News.
NEWS
March 1, 2005
THE Daily News has been remiss in not hiring letter-writer Abe Krieger as a columnist. Krieger is a paragon of wisdom whose views should be shared with all and given a regular space. He would fit right in with the other blowhard conservative columists that cheer for war, incompetent leaders and a police state. But the Daily News should also implement a new rule that would affect Krieger, Michelle Malkin, Michael Smerconish and Christine Flowers. The rule would state that they wouldn't be allowed to include the conservative code words like "liberal," "liberal bias," "Clinton," "class warfare against the rich" and "socialism" in their columns.
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NEWS
September 18, 2013
It's a stretch to think Americans, like French peasants or Russian serfs in centuries past, will rise up and revolt to protest economic inequality in this country. But the continued growth in income disparity should concern Republicans who already think Democrats encourage class warfare to win elections. That the rich get richer while the less affluent struggle just to maintain their lifestyles is nothing new. But the ability of the more affluent to not only survive the last recession, but to seemingly profit from it, has poorer Americans who are still trying to recover from the downturn wondering if they are getting a fair shake.
NEWS
July 27, 2013
By Carter Eskew Republicans are greeting President Obama's summer push on the economy with derision. To House Speaker John Boehner and others, the president seems like an aging rock star whose recycled hits became stale years ago. Yet he still tours, playing to smaller and smaller arenas. While the president is unlikely to be celebrated for his economic record, his presidency marks the end of Republican orthodoxy on economic matters dating to the late 1970s. The Republican frame for 40 years has been that Democrats are the party of tax, spend, and regulation, while Republicans are the party of tax cuts, austerity, and deregulation.
NEWS
March 22, 2013 | BY WILL BUNCH, Daily News Staff Writer bunchw@phillynews.com, 215-854-2957
THERE WERE no champagne corks popping, no ticker tape down Broadway, and only muted cheers on the floor of the New York Stock Exchange earlier this month when the Dow - the supposed blue-chip barometer of America's fiscal health - bulled through its 2007 closing high of 14,164 and kept going higher. There may have been a sense of smug satisfaction up in penthouse boardrooms of corporations that have stashed away an astonishing $1.45 trillion in cash - more than half of that overseas - while average CEO pay continued to rise, even during the bleakest years of the economic crisis.
NEWS
September 27, 2012
Basics of American democracy We are coming up on the anniversary of one of the greatest speeches in American history, Lincoln's Gettysburg Address, Nov. 19, 1863. In just over two minutes, Lincoln laid out the basics of American democracy, calling it government "of the people, by the people, for the people. " Now that we have heard Mitt Romney say to wealthy donors that it's not his job to worry about 47 percent of the American people, might we say that he thinks of American democracy as government "of the rich, by the rich, for the rich"?
NEWS
April 24, 2012 | By E. Thomas McClanahan
A recent poll showed President Obama up by 8 points over putative Republican nominee Mitt Romney. And look at Romney's showing among women. Wow! Obama was crushing him, 57-38. As the poll story dryly put it, "Romney's personal profile needs work. " Boy, that's an understatement. On the subject of who's more friendly and likable, the poll had Obama leading 64-26. Looks like the people have smoked out Romney as a bloodless, calculated rich guy. Not so fast. Romney wouldn't be the ideal Republican candidate in any scenario.
NEWS
January 25, 2012 | By Karen Heller, Inquirer Columnist
Are you ready for some class warfare? We can all agree that by any measure, Mitt Romney is filthy rich. Also, that many voters aren't pleased with his income and his tax returns. Americans have a complicated relationship with wealth. We love money. Moneyed people? Not so much. Especially when they enjoy a lower tax rate than workers dependent for income on jobs. Or when Romney's individual's weekly investment income puts him in the top 1 percent of annual earners.
NEWS
January 12, 2012
By David Shribman New Hampshire shrugged. The great if often cranky arbitrator of presidential politics told America that its neighbor Mitt Romney was good enough to be the GOP nominee, but maybe not sparkly enough to ignite a Republican romance. The first primary sent the former Massachusetts governor on to the next round as the undisputed front-runner, providing him with momentum, if not passion, as the campaign swings south. He's the man to beat - and there are strong indications that no one in this field can beat him. New Hampshire 2012 will be remembered for two important questions, one political and one philosophical, that emerged from a week of intense campaigning.
NEWS
December 9, 2011 | By Angela Couloumbis, INQUIRER HARRISBURG BUREAU
NEW YORK - They would never raise a single tax, not under any circumstance, even for war. Nor allow a woman to have an abortion. Nor limit gun owners' rights. In fact, they said, a gun license from one state should be valid in all. So went the tenor of Friday's debate among seven of 10 Republican candidates from Pennsylvania vying to take on Sen. Bob Casey (D., Pa.) next fall. That is, until the subject of the Penn State scandal came up - and one candidate revealed that he had been a victim of childhood sexual abuse.
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