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Classic Car

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NEWS
August 27, 1989 | By Al Haas, Inquirer Automotive Writer
The automobile, if it can be so designated, is parked in a corner of Bill Hawkins' expansive restoration shop in Frankford. Well, maybe parked isn't the right word. Let's say it is piled in the corner. Its rusty fenders and dusty doors are no longer on intimate terms with its gutted and cancerous carcass. Rather, they are heaped on and around it. "That's the way it came in," Hawkins says of this once and future automobile. "I bought it sight unseen," he adds, as if his visitor could think of any other way someone would pay $6,000 for such a malignancy.
NEWS
July 11, 2012 | By Dan Hardy, Inquirer Staff Writer
Max Foltz never knew Jerry Warfel, but had Jerry's life not come to an early and tragic end, they would have been classmates last fall in the automotive program at Chester County's Center for Arts and Technology's Brandywine Campus. Instead, Jerry Warfel died along with three companions in a late-night car accident July 3, 2011, at age 14, before he could begin school at CAT-Brandywine. And Foltz, at the request of Warfel's parents, ended up helping restore a 1963 Chevy II Nova that their son had begun working on when he was 11, with the goal of driving it to his senior prom.
NEWS
February 15, 1997 | By David Iams, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Even if you are not in the market for an automobile, the Atlantic City Classic Car Auction & Flea Market is a memorable experience. It's a good place to shop for automotive memorabilia and spare parts. And the sea of vehicles at the Atlantic City Convention Center this weekend can't help evoking sentimental memories, be it the 1959 Corvette (with the Pennsylvania vanity plate "COOL59") that a Bucks County owner says is worth $38,000, or the 1931 wood-paneled Ford station wagon.
NEWS
September 12, 2004 | By Stephen Goldstein FOR THE INQUIRER
There is a sparkle in the eye of classic-car enthusiasts when they describe a vehicle they have restored or even one they long to. They all have a story behind how they took up the hobby. As teens, maybe they lived in towns where Friday night cruising was the thing to do. Maybe they had love affairs with certain car models as youths but couldn't afford them until now. Whatever the case, once the restoration bug hits, it hits hard. Even after one project is finished, there is always another old car that catches the eye. "A classic car is a love affair with a car," said Harry Urwiler, president of the Classic Corvette Club of Moorestown.
NEWS
October 7, 1994 | By Barbara J. Richberg, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Thomas Remick Sr., 51, who loved horses and cars, and who owned throughbred horses, an auto shop, an auto supply company and a classic car, died Wednesday at his home in Northeast Philadelphia. Mr. Remick owned and operated Tom Remick's Auto Repairs. He had been in business for 30 years until illness caused him to retire last year. He also owned and operated Remick's Quaker City Motor Parts Co. Both businesses are in Kensington and are now operated by his son, Thomas Jr. Mr. Remick owned throughbred horses for more than 30 years.
NEWS
September 7, 1987 | By Ron Gower, Special to The Inquirer
John E. Morgan has gone from updated underwear to ancient autos, from "seat" covers to rumble seats. The former owner of the J.E. Morgan Knitting Mills in Hometown, Pa. - he sold the company, the country's largest maker of long johns, to a Scottish firm in 1984 - has had a lifelong interest in antique cars. But after the sale of his business the interest became a passion, and he has spent the last 18 months scouring the United States and Canada for Rickenbackers and Rios. This weekend, the hobby officially became a business enterprise when Morgan opened the doors to the first visitors at the J.E.M.
NEWS
January 5, 1992 | By Christine Bahls, Special to The Inquirer
Thomas Gatley had a funny feeling about backing his 1952 Bentley into the parking lot of the Barn Cinema on Route 611 in Doylestown Township. The classic brown and cream car with the chrome-plated brass radiator cap was parked in the first row, its impressive front facing the lot. So Gatley turned the car around to face the street. Big mistake. After Gatley, his wife and friends returned from seeing Father of the Bride on Dec. 28, his wife noticed as they drove away that the $400 radiator cap was missing.
NEWS
May 20, 1998 | By Melody McDonald, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
It was a 1966 Plymouth Barracuda, candy-apple red with white racing stripes and a souped-up engine. Only 258 were made that year. Only about 50 are still in existence. It tore John Rattacasa's heart to turn the classic car over to an local auto dealer to sell on commission for about $15,000. It tore more than his heart when the dealer disappeared, apparently staging his own abduction. Now, Rattacasa and nine other Pennsylvania and New Jersey residents have filed a class-action suit against the dealership and the New York-based financial company that seized the vehicles.
NEWS
May 2, 1998 | By Denise-Marie Balona, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
The owner of a Williamstown classic-car dealership who was believed to have been abducted in March has been found living under an alias in Tucson, Ariz., where he told authorities he was hiding from the mob. Police discounted his story and charged him with theft and fraud. Nicholas DiGrosso, 44, who owns the American Muscle Car dealership in Williamstown, was found on April 21 in Tucson. Investigators said DiGrosso moved there with an undisclosed amount of money, proceeds from the sale of seven cars whose owners had put them on DiGrosso's lot on consignment.
NEWS
November 4, 1997 | By Anthony Beckman, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
For the last 10 years, Bob Poole parked his mint-condition 1931 Hupmobile in a backyard shed to protect it from the elements. With gracefully curved wheel wells, a square cab, and gray leather interior, the vehicle is reminiscent of an Al Capone getaway car. But yesterday, it lay overturned on its passenger side, its four wheels and underside facing the street. Weather officials said a small tornado spun through the 100 block of Fairview Drive around noon Sunday, destroying Poole's shed and leaving his classic car tilted among the debris.
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NEWS
April 7, 2015
C ALVIN MILLER, 23, of Blue Bell, is co-founder and CEO of MotorCar Studios, a digital-content-marketing company promoting the classic-car and car-restoration markets. The startup specializes in Web videos, mini-documentaries and photography to develop content-marketing strategies for its clients. Q: The backstory on the idea for MotorCar Studios? A: It started in an entrepreneurship class last year at Temple. The idea was to start a business and be profitable by the end of fall semester.
SPORTS
November 8, 2014 | By Matt Breen, Inquirer Staff Writer
The buzz at Joe Hand's Gym that came with Bernard Hopkins' media day last week had simmered. A day later, it was time for the 49-year-old to focus again on Saturday's fight against Sergey Kovalev. The dozen spectators - mostly members of Hopkins' camp - pulled up chairs or sat on the tile floor. They watched in near silence, speaking in whispers, as Hopkins readied to spar at the Northern Liberties gym. Hopkins called his opponent "Iron Fists," a 27-year-old Ukranian who was instructed to mimic Kovalev's fighting style.
NEWS
April 6, 2013 | By Carrie Rickey, For The Inquirer
Roger Ebert, America's moviegoer-in-chief, died Thursday in his beloved Chicago, where for 46 years his ardent reviews drew readers to the Sun-Times. He was 70 and, since 2002, valiantly had faced down cancers of the salivary and thyroid kind. Mr. Ebert posted a blog Tuesday announcing that he was taking a "leave of presence" from intensive reviewing while he received radiation treatments for yet another cancer recurrence. Among his many accomplishments, Mr. Ebert was the first film critic to win a Pulitzer Prize.
NEWS
April 5, 2013 | By Carrie Rickey, FOR THE INQUIRER
Roger Ebert, America's moviegoer-in-chief, died Thursday in his beloved Chicago where for 46 years his ardent reviews drew readers to the Sun-Times. He was 70 and since 2002 valiantly had faced down cancers of the salivary and thyroid kind. Mr. Ebert posted a blog Tuesday announcing that he was taking a "leave of presence" from intensive reviewing while he received radiation treatments for yet another cancer recurrence. Among his many accomplishments, Mr. Ebert was the first film critic to win a Pulitzer Prize.
NEWS
August 3, 2012 | By Julie Zauzmer, Inquirer Staff Writer
A Kensington garage housing 15 classic cars and up to 19 additional vehicles caught fire Wednesday morning, likely damaging all the cars beyond repair, according to a fire department official and the garage owner. The garage on the 1900 block of East Westmoreland Street had been home to most of the vehicles owned by the Latin Cruisers Car Club since the club was founded in 1991 by Hispanic antique-car enthusiasts, who felt unwelcome in the city's mostly white car clubs, said club president Scott Tennesen.
NEWS
August 2, 2012 | By Julie Zauzmer, Inquirer Staff Writer
A two-alarm fire ripped through a garage building in Kensington today, sending black smoke billowing into the sky and damaging or destroying at least 15 classic cars. One firefighter was taken to a hospital to be treated for heat exhaustion suffered while battling the blaze at Jasper and East Cornwall Streets. The fire was reported around 9:30 a.m. and escalated to a second alarm about 9:45 a.m. as 150 firefighters and 22 pieces of equipment responded to the blaze, officials said.
NEWS
July 11, 2012 | By Dan Hardy, Inquirer Staff Writer
Max Foltz never knew Jerry Warfel, but had Jerry's life not come to an early and tragic end, they would have been classmates last fall in the automotive program at Chester County's Center for Arts and Technology's Brandywine Campus. Instead, Jerry Warfel died along with three companions in a late-night car accident July 3, 2011, at age 14, before he could begin school at CAT-Brandywine. And Foltz, at the request of Warfel's parents, ended up helping restore a 1963 Chevy II Nova that their son had begun working on when he was 11, with the goal of driving it to his senior prom.
NEWS
May 15, 2012 | By Michael Vitez, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Three years ago, Inquirer reporter Michael Vitez wrote about Matt Miller, an aspiring young triathlete who survived a cycling crash that, but for an extraordinary stroke of luck, would have killed him. The stories drew an overwhelming response from readers. Vitez gives a full account of Matt's accident and his struggle to recover in a newly published book, "The Road Back: A Journey of Grace and Grit. " The following excerpt comes from the opening chapter. Mark Harris didn't know what caused the cyclist to spill over the double yellow line and fall into the path of the oncoming blue Porsche, but he saw it happen.
NEWS
November 28, 2008 | By Art Carey INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
When the stock market plunged a few weeks ago, Lou Mandich wondered whether the phone would ring again at his Last Chance Garage. Mandich, who specializes in the care and repair of vintage automobiles, needn't have worried. Customers still call, and Mandich and his team of three mechanics have at least a two-week backlog. "I think we are just fortunate to have a large customer base," Mandich modestly explains. He could have added "loyal" and "peculiar. " People who love old cars, anyone familiar with the hobby will tell you, love them profoundly and irrationally.
NEWS
August 27, 2008 | By Sally A. Downey INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
James A. Grundy, 81, formerly of Riverton, retired owner of an insurance agency for car collectors, died of Alzheimer's disease Friday at Manor Care in Towson, Md. Mr. Grundy graduated from Lower Merion High School. During World War II, he served in the Army in the Philippines and Korea. After his discharge, he worked for an insurer in Philadelphia, then established his firm in Jenkintown in the mid-1950s. He began to specialize in policies for classic cars after his father-in-law, Sam Baily, a collector, said the policies would be profitable because the cars were valuable and unlikely to be damaged in accidents.
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