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NEWS
June 19, 2016 | By Peter Dobrin, Classical Music Critic
Seven Responses 8 p.m. Friday and Saturday at the Philadelphia Episcopal Cathedral, 38th and Chestnut Streets. Tickets: $30-75. Information: www.crossingchoir.com
ENTERTAINMENT
February 27, 1986 | By Daniel Webster, Inquirer Music Critic
President Reagan has not yet sent Philip Habib to the bunker housing the National Academy of Recording Arts & Sciences (NARAS), but some high-level problem-solver may be needed before that group detonates another round of Grammy Awards. In the past, the Grammys for classical-music recordings have escaped broad notice for the fundamental reason that prizes are at best meaningless in art and at worst destructive. Pictures of Soviet composers wearing their medals make musicians laugh - a little sadly.
NEWS
September 24, 1987 | By Lesley Valdes, Inquirer Music Critic
Unlike its counterparts overseas, the American classical music industry has never made enough of a fuss about music of its own. This is due partly to the conservative nature of the art form itself: Patriotism, like protest movements, usually circles round the masses rather than more elitist groups. Then, too, it has taken a long long time to get over our cultural inferiority complex. Lacking a Three B's of American repertoire to enthuse over, major record companies here have gladly stuck to safer European classics - which in recent years has been easy to do, because a number of firms have been sold to conglomerates based abroad.
NEWS
January 29, 2012 | By Peter Dobrin, Inquirer Music Critic
The Kimmel Center is presenting less expensive, less exotic visiting orchestras. Local ensembles are increasing collaborations, so that the same event does double or triple duty by counting as a concert in the brochures of multiple organizations. And the city's musical face to the larger world, the Philadelphia Orchestra, has been in bankruptcy more than nine months and doesn't hope to exit until sometime after the filing's first anniversary. Times are tough. Young artists from the Curtis Institute of Music are leaving the nest and heading into careers of equal parts risk and promise.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 30, 1995 | By Peter Dobrin, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Outing has come to classical music, and the Schubert is flying off the shelves. So is the Chopin. Tchaikovsky, Saint-Saens, Bernstein and Britten, too. They are among the composers grouped together on Out Classics, an RCA release making a big splash. Trumpets an invitation on the back of the CD: "Revel in over an hour of seductive classics by eight of the world's greatest composers who just happen to be gay. " Hordes are taking RCA up on the offer, even though no one can be sure whether all of these composers really happened to be gay. The disc has made the Billboard Top Classical Albums chart for the last several weeks, jockeying neck-and-neck with Sensual Classics, Too. That CD offers works by straight composers, but also aims squarely at a gay market by featuring on its cover, as does Out Classics, a homoerotic photo.
LIVING
December 13, 1996 | By Paddy Noyes, FOR THE INQUIRER
Usually Lissette, 11, is at the center of the action - whether playing kickball, rollerblading, swinging, or throwing a ball. Music, however, pulls her to a corner of a room to be by herself. She will sit on the floor, hum, and do sign language. Classical music is her favorite, with Beethoven and Mozart leading the way. Church music runs a close second. She'll nod and smile when she hears "Jesus loves me, this I know. " When Lissette went into foster care, from a background of abuse and neglect, she could often be found going through the garbage, looking for food.
NEWS
October 7, 1990 | By Will Thompson, Inquirer Staff Writer
It becomes more evident each fall that many of the best classical music concerts in the region take place in Delaware County and nearby communities that are conveniently accessible to county residents. The performances include the Sunday afternoon chamber music concert series under soft chandelier light in the ballroom of Wallingford Community Arts Center, the Lansdowne Symphony Orchestra and specific concerts in the Wayne Concert Series. The 65-member Lansdowne Symphony Orchestra, for example, has provided outstanding classical music in Lansdowne since 1945, when it was common for most suburban residents to travel to Philadelphia to hear orchestras.
NEWS
April 6, 2010 | By Peter Dobrin INQUIRER MUSIC CRITIC
You know Mendelssohn's Overture to A Midsummer Night's Dream like the back of your hand thanks to a second-grade teacher who first set the fairy score aglow in your imagination. But did you ever hear the abrupt gesture a few minutes into the score as the donkey bray it was meant to evoke? On a purely abstract level, Smetana's M? Vlast is wondrous music. But it doesn't fully reveal itself unless you already know about ??rka's revenge on the male race, and that the impertinent bassoon part near the end is the snore of the men she lulls to sleep.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 26, 2004 | By David Patrick Stearns INQUIRER MUSIC CRITIC
For all the grand and eccentric characters in classical music, the medium has stood somewhat apart from the electronic visual age - until it began mating with DVD. It looks like a happy honeymoon. Who, for example, would have thought that Dame Felicity Lott's memorable recital two years ago at the Kimmel Center - enjoyed by 700 or so local voice-lovers - could be taken home from the DVD bins of retail stores or ordered on Amazon.com Web pages? Pianophiles still mourn the absence of the Russian Grigory Sokolov, who made a blinding impression here years ago but no longer tours the United States.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
September 18, 2016 | By Peter Dobrin and David Patrick Stearns
It's a grand year for singing in Philadelphia. Besides an unusually starry lineup of vocal recitals from the Philadelphia Chamber Music Society, Opera Company of Philadelphia has a potentially distinguished cast of Turandot headed by Christine Goerke and Joyce El-Khoury. And might its premiere production of Breaking the Waves yield a signature role for its stage-savvy star, Kiera Duffy? Piffaro's The Musical World of Don Quixote concerts feature the excellent early-music group New York Polyphony, and the Delius Society celebrates its 40th anniversary by collaborating with Choral Arts on the rarely heard Delius Requiem . In the larger world, British conductor Simon Rattle and Finnish composer Kaija Saariaho are making significant residencies on the East Coast that will leave a mark on Philadelphia.
NEWS
August 21, 2016
Around the world without a plane ticket. Thanks to web radio, the great festivals of the United States and Europe are available live and archived. The Boston Symphony Orchestra's Friday, Saturday, and Sunday concerts at Tanglewood are heard live on WGBH in Boston - www.wgbh.org . - including this Saturday's concert performance of Aida, Acts 1 and 2, starring Kristine Opolais. The February-through-April concerts from Boston's Symphony Hall are available for streaming on www.bso.org . The BBC Proms are archived on www.bbc.co.uk in concerts that range from straight classical to Gershwin.
NEWS
July 29, 2016
Mark Obert-Thorn remembers what it was like to grow up a classical-record listener in Philadelphia of a certain era.   I started buying classical records around 1973, when I was still in high school. At first, I got them at the suburban malls out near where I lived. But on the special occasions when I'd go in town, my favorite record store was Franklin Music. They had two locations on Chestnut Street, both of which eventually became Sam Goody's: one at 11th, and another at 8th. The first one was bigger, but I preferred the other one because of the special treasures they had there.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 6, 2016 | By Shaun Brady, For The Inquirer
There are entire horror movies that aren't as unnerving as the opening credits to John Carpenter's Halloween . What's so eerie, and sets the tone for a film that has become a revered horror classic and spawned too many better-left-unmentioned sequels, isn't the slow zoom into the firelit face of a menacingly grinning jack-o'-lantern. It's the insistent, jittery score, a simple piano melody repeating over a menacing drone. Like the film itself, that memorable music is the work of John Carpenter, who composed the scores for many of his own films.
NEWS
June 19, 2016 | By Peter Dobrin, Classical Music Critic
Seven Responses 8 p.m. Friday and Saturday at the Philadelphia Episcopal Cathedral, 38th and Chestnut Streets. Tickets: $30-75. Information: www.crossingchoir.com
NEWS
June 19, 2016
Requiem for Orlando. Musicians will gather at 3 p.m. Sunday at First Presbyterian Church in Philadelphia, 21st and Walnut Streets, in a musical memorial to victims of last week's mass murder in Orlando. Church music director Andrew Senn will lead musicians from the Academy of Vocal Arts, Opera Philadelphia, Philadelphia Orchestra, and others in movements from the requiems of Brahms and Fauré, choral music by Mozart and Dawson, the "Nimrod" movement from Elgar's Enigma Variations , and Barber's Adagio for Strings . A freewill offering will go toward Heeding God's Call, a faith-based anti-gun-violence group, and the William Way LGBT Community Center.
NEWS
June 13, 2016
Time was, summer in Philadelphia meant a vacation for, and from, the arts. Classical groups in particular tended to throw up their hands and wait for audiences to return from Long Beach Island, Eagles Mere, or Maine. As last season suggested, the city has become a summer playground in its own right, and classical groups are catching on. Yes, the sylvan settings of Marlboro Music Festival and Tanglewood beckon, and there is still room for some really smart group to set down anchor in the city with an ambitious summer arts festival.
NEWS
June 13, 2016
Where classical music is concerned, the vacation months are now a haven for niche programming - sometimes of the extreme sort. The idea is that if it's your niche, you'll travel for it. So what's worth the current gasoline prices? Here's a selection of great classical programs within a day's drive. Farewell to Claude Frank; Hello to Rossini (Caramoor Center for Music and the Arts; Katonah, N.Y.) From June 18 to Aug. 7, Caramoor has a full range of chamber music and orchestral programs on this gracious 90-acre estate.
NEWS
June 3, 2016 | By Peter Dobrin, CLASSICAL MUSIC CRITIC
How can Yannick hold both jobs at once? What makes him a good fit for the job? Will he stay committed to Philadelphia? Consolidating his young but flowering career, Yannick Nézet-Séguin will assume the podium of the Metropolitan Opera in New York while remaining music director of the Philadelphia Orchestra. Nézet-Séguin, 41, will phase in his Met duties gradually, becoming music director-designate in the 2017-18 season with two productions, and music director in 2020-21 leading five, the opera company announced Thursday.
NEWS
May 20, 2016 | By David Patrick Stearns, CLASSICAL MUSIC CRITIC
After a long season of events that go to the depths of pretty much everything, from Cold Mountain to Mahler's Symphony No. 8 , Philadelphia classical concertgoers had sounds for sore ears from Dolce Suono Ensemble, which on Tuesday ended its season with Música en tus Manos (Music in Your Hands)/The Americas Project, a buoyant celebration of the Americas, most notably music of Brazil and Peru. It was the closest thing to summer amid what has been a chilly, rainy week. Founder/director Mimi Stillman said her ensemble had never gone this far into popular music, with transcriptions of songs by George Gershwin as well as lesser-known South American songwriters such as Carlos Guastavino and David Haro.
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