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NEWS
May 1, 1995 | By Gloria A. Hoffner, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
At the end of a long day, in the midst of a seemingly endless semester, how is a stressed-out teacher to cope? "Open the classroom door, step into the hallway, and yell 'massage train.' It's the signal for all the teachers on your floor to run to your rescue with a good neck message," said Elaine M. Lundberg, a professional humorist. "Schedule about 20 of these a day, and you'll be sure to feel less stress on the job. " For sure, but what about the stress felt by the principal as the unattended students clamor in the classroom?
SPORTS
November 22, 2013 | BY TOM MAHON, Daily News Staff Writer mahont@phillynews.com
A LOT OF COACHES consider themselves teachers, including Bashir Mason. But unlike his contemporaries, Mason, the head men's basketball coach at Wagner College in Staten Island, N.Y., actually spends time in a classroom. Mason, the starting point guard at Drexel for four seasons (2003-2006) is a student teacher at the Petrides School, a 5-minute drive from Wagner. He has been teaching first and fourth grades since Sept. 9. The stint will end on Dec. 13 when he completes the requirements for his master's in early childhood education.
NEWS
December 24, 2011 | By Dan Hardy, Inquirer Staff Writer
This week, with the winter holidays fast approaching, it seemed that Joe Pisacano's fifth-grade class at McDonald-Davis Elementary School in Bucks County's Centennial district had abandoned education for celebration. Thursday afternoon, Pisacano, in a bright red cap and shirt and billing himself as a "Skateboarding Santa," toted his beloved 1976 G&S board, decorated with tinsel and a tiny Christmas tree, to the ramp in the hallway outside his classroom. To cheers and gasps from his students, he made a series of runs down the hall, smacking into a stack of gift-wrapped boxes at the bottom.
NEWS
February 16, 2011 | By Kristin E. Holmes, Inquirer Staff Writer
An associate professor at Widener University School of Law in Wilmington may lose his job following accusations that he used hypothetical examples of the dean's violent death as part of classroom exercises. Lawrence J. Connell, a tenured professor, is accused of using examples that describe dean Linda L. Ammons' shooting death at least ten times in classes on murder and criminal procedure, said Thomas S. Neuberger, Connell's attorney. Connell, 58, described himself as the hypothetical shooter in the classroom examples, Neuberger said.
NEWS
April 9, 2011 | By Kristin E. Holmes and Gustavo Solis, Inquirer Staff Writers
WILMINGTON - A tenured professor fighting to keep his job at Widener University School of Law after allegedly making classroom comments about a dean has sued the official for defamatory remarks she is accused of making about him. As part of classroom exercises, Lawrence J. Connell used what he called hypothetical examples in which he "decided to shoot" the dean. The school, which is investigating the matter, has placed him on paid administrative leave. In his suit, Connell, an associate professor, has accused the dean, Linda L. Ammons, of intentionally making false statements, in proceedings to oust him, that characterize him as a racist and sexist.
NEWS
August 9, 1988 | By William Raspberry
Some years ago, a group of minority students took a standard pencil-and- paper examination as part of their training at Temple University's medical school. Most scored below average on the exam. Then they were tested again - by the same professor, for the same knowledge - this time not in a classroom but in a hospital setting, using the tools that doctors use. Most scored well above average. Lauren Resnick may not be familiar with the Temple experiment, but she would not be surprised by the results.
NEWS
July 25, 1993 | By MARILYN DUFF
Boy enters classroom, turns to face classmates, begins to raise hand slowly. Kids sitting in rows cower and shield faces. Soundtrack and pulsing strobe suggest automatic weapon fire. Blood spatters kids' foreheads, hands, shirt-fronts. Heavy metal soundtrack grinds to silence and the TV screen goes black - followed by a commercial for McDonald's Big Mac. A violent TV episode? By any measure. Will it be labeled as such when the networks' new policy goes into effect this fall? No. Why?
NEWS
March 19, 1993 | By Maureen Fitzgerald, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Fifteen years ago, Clare Blaha Devine had to beg, borrow and everything but steal to get a single computer for the gifted and talented class she was teaching in Toms River. Today, she presides over a brand-new lab at North Dover Elementary School with 28 computers, an international telecommunications program, a CD Rom unit, a LCD panel that projects the computer screen on the wall, a camera that takes digitized photos that can be printed, even a computerized "Logo Lego" project that lets students program Lego creations equipped with temperature, motion and light sensors.
NEWS
September 28, 2014 | By Susan Snyder, Inquirer Staff Writer
For professor Randy Weinstein's chemical engineering course at Villanova University, students are supposed to watch on video what has traditionally been the heart of college learning - the lecture - before they show up for class. So he gave them a quiz to make sure they'd done just that. "Everybody watched the carbon-dioxide video," Weinstein said, nodding with satisfaction when he saw that 88 percent of the students answered one of the questions correctly. Weinstein had embedded the video in a 27-minute lecture he recorded for the class - chemical engineering thermodynamics II - from the comfort of his dining room table.
NEWS
August 25, 2014 | By Andrew Seidman, Inquirer Staff Writer
A Cherry Hill teacher placed on paid leave in 2012 after a secret recording revealed staff members' abusive remarks toward a student will return to the district next month, her lawyer said Friday. A parent had stashed the recording device in his autistic son's pocket to try to learn why the boy had been acting out in school. The incident drew national attention when the father uploaded a 6½-hour recording to YouTube. A judge ruled in May that the surreptitious recording was illegal.
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