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NEWS
September 29, 1994 | By Rhonda Goodman, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
When many people think of their first loves, they smile at the distant memory and then go about their daily lives. But Cedarbrook Middle School Principal Joseph K. Cifelli embraces his first love every day. Between 9 and 9:45 every morning, instead of attending meetings, disciplining students and pushing papers, Cifelli is in a classroom, teaching a life-science course for 30 seventh graders. "The interaction with the kids, watching them grow and develop and seeing them learn something that I love, is an overwhelmingly rewarding thing to do," he said while seated at a round table filed with science magazine articles.
NEWS
June 24, 2008 | By Diane Mastrull INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Without context, the security camera footage is a snoozer, a second-by-second account of life in an elementary school's corridors. On one length of tape, backpack-laden students and teachers just arriving for school are on the way to homeroom. On another, students are headed to the library around lunchtime. But to Warminster Det. David Bonacquisti, the tape is solid evidence that Susan Romanyszyn is not only a liar, but the person behind nine days of terrorizing notes left throughout Longstreth Elementary School last year.
NEWS
December 14, 1997 | By Scott Fallon, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
The township's school district, which already has one computer for every five students, will be lowering that ratio a little more. Starting next fall, West Deptford schools will receive almost $130,000 - $40 per child - for the next five years from the state Department of Education's Distance Learning Funding Project to buy computers. The 3,000-student district plans to buy 200 new computers, assuring that every classroom in its five schools, as well as each office in its administration building, has one. West Deptford already has 600 computers in various school laboratories and school libraries.
NEWS
September 3, 1995 | By Tara Dooley, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
For 27 sixth graders here, the first day of school Wednesday will be a school first. In contrast to a class that separates special-education students from others, this new class at the Herma S. Simmons Elementary School will bring sixth graders of all abilities in front of one chalkboard. "You and I don't go shopping at the regular-education Acme instead of the special-education Acme," said school principal Jay Dugan. "So in reality, why do we separate when that's not what happens in life?"
NEWS
June 17, 1993 | By Paul J. Lim, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Ruth Carver envisions a classroom without walls. An educational environment where students are linked to the world outside, and to schools hundreds of miles away, by high-tech computer networks. A classroom of the future. For Carver, that future may be coming soon. Last week, the Flourtown mathematics teacher was one of three Pennsylvania teachers chosen by Gov. Casey to take part in an experimental project established this year by American Telephone & Telegraph Corp.
SPORTS
May 13, 1999 | By Josh Egerman, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Marvin Sewell ran from his academic responsibilities for two years. Then he decided he just wanted to run. "I thought I was the man and I didn't have to do nothing. It was all fun and games," said Sewell, a Pennsauken senior. "I wanted to run track, and that led to a push in school. " The push in the classroom is nearly as impressive as his fluid strides and impressive speed, which carried him to the 800-meter title April 30 at the South Jersey Track and Field Carnival.
SPORTS
February 13, 1998 | By Scott Brown, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Flashing in front of the player on the left wing, yet maintaining textbook defensive position, Eric DeSheilds knocks the pass away, scoops up the ball, and races in for a layup. That one steal epitomizes the senior shooting guard's rise from obscure reserve to indispensable player. If the Colonial Conference gave a most-improved player award, DeSheilds would be tough to beat. His play has allowed West Deptford to give chase to a conference title. At 11-3 in the Colonial entering last night's action, West Deptford was just a half-game out of first.
NEWS
February 25, 1996
Read through thousands of essays by students asked to evaluate their education, and you see one phrase repeated more than any other: School is boring. There is some elaboration, of course: Teachers just talk, don't care. Rowdy kids disrupt class. Subject matter isn't relevant. Tests are busy work. Grades mean nothing (or everything). Rules don't make sense and aren't fairly applied. On the surface, none of this grumbling might strike an adult as terribly unusual or meaningful; who among us didn't think school was more chore than delight?
NEWS
January 13, 1997 | By Patricia Smith, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
The tab comes to almost $50,000. That's what Camden County towns paid in just seven months to cover the costs of teachers and other school staff serving jury duty, according to a report prepared by the Camden County Association of School Administrators. And that doesn't include the non-financial toll. "There's more of an impact than just dollars and cents," said Angela Wilborne, assistant to the Camden City superintendent. "You're taking teachers out of the classroom, and that means you're impacting the quality of instruction.
NEWS
July 17, 2004 | By Toni Callas INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Taking calls on a cell phone during a job interview is not a good idea. Neither is showing the tattoo of a girlfriend's name when asked for thoughts on loyalty. And it's probably bad form to ask, "So why am I here?" Extreme as they are, those are some of the real-life missteps that Nancy Logue has seen as the director of organizational development and training for Resorts Atlantic City casino. Yesterday she shared her stories with South Jersey teachers who plan to take them to the classroom in September.
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