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NEWS
June 25, 2013
Teachers rightly complain they are too often blamed for every shortcoming in America's public schools today. It certainly is not teachers' fault that too many schools, especially in big cities, are inadequately funded and staffed to produce the results expected of them. It's also not teachers' fault when colleges gladly pocket education students' tuition and send them out with diplomas and certificates that perpetuate the lie that they are classroom ready. That reality has been corroborated by a new report from the National Council on Teacher Quality that gives high marks to only 9 percent of America's collegiate teacher training programs.
NEWS
June 22, 2013 | By Walter F. Naedele, Inquirer Staff Writer
When Edna Van Liew Bailey became one of the first four teachers granted a sabbatical year by the board of education in Cherry Hill, it was a mixed blessing. In that 1971-72 school year, the first-grade teacher at Malberg Elementary School took classes toward a master's degree in education at what was then Glassboro State College. "Term papers and reading seemed to take up so much of my time, because I'd been away from studying so long," she told an interviewer. "Plus," she said, "the pressure was on," because "my kids were waiting to see my marks!"
NEWS
June 15, 2013 | By Sean Carlin, Inquirer Staff Writer
In an effort to add classrooms to the Knowledge A to Z (KATZ) Academy Charter School in Camden, the city Planning Board approved a proposal Thursday that would eliminate a pool in the Parkside Boys and Girls Club, which houses the school. The school wants to fill in the pool to make room for seven classrooms, bringing its total to 15. The extra classrooms could add 112 students, said Marcella Dalsey, president and cofounder of the charter. The school now has 135 students in the Parkside building and 60 at a former school in the city's Rosedale section.
NEWS
April 29, 2013 | By Leslie Brody, THE RECORD OF WOODLAND PARK
A rising number of New Jersey students say they learn more when they can put their teacher on pause - or rewind and replay. Instead of listening to lectures in school, they are watching their teachers' lessons on computers or cellphones at home. Then when they come back into the classroom the next day, they tackle the kind of problems that used to be assigned as homework - only now, a teacher or their peers can help them immediately when they get stuck. It is called the "flipped classroom," a national trend that is a growing part of the fast-changing world of education as teachers harness the power of digital tools.
NEWS
April 2, 2013 | BY JOHN F. MORRISON, Daily News Staff Writer morrisj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5573
ERLENE BASS NELSON taught kindergarten in the Philadelphia School District for 51 years, and there was no doubt that she enjoyed every minute of it for one, simple reason: She loved the children. Children, she once said, "are spontaneous, they're loving, they're forgiving - and every day I had an injection of pure love into my soul and into my heart. " Spending all that time in a school district that was often short of money and afflicted with labor problems, violence and other woes.
NEWS
February 21, 2013 | By Susan Snyder, Inquirer Staff Writer
Jordan Shapiro's class last week delved into a weighty discussion of Plato's allegory of the cave and shifting perceptions of reality. Front and center on the classroom wall behind him flashed a constantly shifting series of posts on Twitter, all under the class hashtag of #Mosaic1. With her Nook and phone at hand, sophomore Kaylyn Christian, 20, tweeted: "Are you really happy if you live a successful life in the shadows?" Shapiro's Temple University classroom is definitely not the norm in academia, but it could be a harbinger of the future.
NEWS
January 18, 2013 | BY MORGAN ZALOT, Daily News Staff Writer zalotm@phillynews.com, 215-854-5928
THE MOTHER of the 5-year-old girl abducted from her kindergarten classroom at Bryant Elementary, in West Philadelphia, earlier this week has retained high-profile attorney Tom Kline. Kline on Thursday told the Daily News that Latifah Rashid contacted him Wednesday for help in the ongoing investigation around her daughter's abduction - about which police have reported no new developments. "She wants to turn her attention to taking care of her daughter, and so she thought that she needed help and reached out to me, and I told her that I would undertake the task," Kline said.
NEWS
January 17, 2013
How could this happen? After all the sad stories that have been told about child kidnappings across America, how could the brazen abduction of a little girl from her West Philadelphia school happen? As more disturbing details unfold, it has become clear that the Philadelphia School District dropped the ball in what a spokesman admits was "a complete breakdown in protocol. " Kindergartner Na'illa Robinson was easily taken from her classroom at Bryant Elementary Monday by an unknown woman who was able to skirt school security procedures easily.
NEWS
January 17, 2013 | BY DAVID GAMBACORTA, DANA DiFILIPPO & STEPHANIE FARR, Daily News Staff Writer gambacd@phillynews.com, 215-854-5994
THEY'RE STILL out there, the bastards who pulled little Na'illa Robinson from the comfort and innocence of her kindergarten classroom and thrust her into a world of pure terror that included being stripped, blindfolded and then abandoned on the grounds of a frigid, darkened playground, with just a damp, black T-shirt to keep her from freezing to death. After a passer-by, Nelson Mandela Myers, found the 5-year-old girl hiding like a wounded animal under a yellow slide early Tuesday in Upper Darby, authorities said she told him that she had been stolen.
NEWS
December 5, 2012 | By Josh Lederman, Associated Press
WASHINGTON - Open your notebooks, and sharpen your pencils. School for thousands of public school students is about to get quite a bit longer. Five states announced Monday that they will add at least 300 hours of learning time to the calendar in some schools starting in 2013. Colorado, Connecticut, Massachusetts, New York, and Tennessee will take part in the initiative, which is intended to boost student achievement and make U.S. schools more competitive globally. The three-year pilot program will affect almost 20,000 students in 40 schools, with long-term hopes of expanding the program to include additional schools - especially those that serve low-income communities.
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