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NEWS
April 21, 2014 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writer
Paul A. Orlov, 66, of Berwyn, a retired college professor so commanding in the classroom a student once dubbed him "the Emperor of English," died Tuesday, April 8, of cancer at Bryn Mawr Hospital. Dr. Orlov was an associate professor emeritus of English and American studies at Pennsylvania State University's Brandywine campus in Media. He was known for his interpretations of the novels of Theodore Dreiser from philosophical and sociological perspectives. Dr. Orlov authored a book on Dreiser's An American Tragedy published by Bucknell University Press, along with numerous articles in journals and book chapters.
NEWS
February 7, 2014 | By Julia Terruso, Inquirer Staff Writer
Mr. Parsons' robotics club needs an updated Lego Mindstorm bot if the members want a chance of placing in future competitions. Mrs. Rodriguez's fourth and fifth graders would love a carpet in their book corner, so they don't have to sit on cold linoleum while reading. And Ms. Gail, the art teacher at Henry L. Bonsall Elementary, has an idea for a stepping-stone garden that would line Mount Ephraim Avenue - if she could just get the funding for 20 mosaics. The projects, all listed on the teacher fundraising website DonorsChoose, aren't the traditional requests for notebooks and protractors, but Camden teachers say they're exactly what their students need.
NEWS
January 29, 2014 | By Melanie Burney, Inquirer Staff Writer
Brooklawn School Superintendent John Kellmayer has a simple wish list for his crowded, one-building Camden County district: more space. Kellmayer hopes that he has made a strong-enough case to persuade voters Tuesday to approve a $1.9 million bond proposal to convert a nearby former Catholic church into a middle school. The district spends thousands of dollars annually to send its special-education students outside the district because it has no space. At Alice Costello Elementary School, a classroom is inside the gym. The art and music programs share a classroom, and music lessons are taught on the stage.
NEWS
December 13, 2013
WHEN the School District of Philadelphia announced plans to shutter 24 underused school buildings, the prospect of violent fights between students of merging schools loomed large among the many crosses that the district had to bear - including a $304 million budget shortfall which at one point led Superintendent William Hite to threaten a cut to sports, art and music. It's great when dire predictions not only don't come true, but get turned on their ear. Martin Luther King High and Germantown High were two former rivals who weathered decades of bad blood, and their merger produced great anxiety.
SPORTS
November 22, 2013 | BY TOM MAHON, Daily News Staff Writer mahont@phillynews.com
A LOT OF COACHES consider themselves teachers, including Bashir Mason. But unlike his contemporaries, Mason, the head men's basketball coach at Wagner College in Staten Island, N.Y., actually spends time in a classroom. Mason, the starting point guard at Drexel for four seasons (2003-2006) is a student teacher at the Petrides School, a 5-minute drive from Wagner. He has been teaching first and fourth grades since Sept. 9. The stint will end on Dec. 13 when he completes the requirements for his master's in early childhood education.
NEWS
October 7, 2013 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writer
Carolyn Finney, 92, a teacher for 40 years at Martha Washington School in West Philadelphia, died Sunday, Sept. 15, of complications from cancer at Saunders House in Wynnewood. "Finney," as she was known to friends, was a popular first-grade teacher who later became a reading specialist at Martha Washington. She was known for being a calm and structured person who laid out clearly what she expected of students and coworkers. "She was old-school," said David Poindexter, who started out as her classroom aide and became like a son to her. "She expected students to be mannerly, to read, to enunciate and spell, and to write in cursive.
NEWS
September 21, 2013 | By Julie Zauzmer, Inquirer Staff Writer
When 10-year-old Carlos Jackson decided he wanted to go to a different school, he took his request all the way to the top. First he told his family. Then he sent e-mails to several charter school principals asking for admission. But he wanted to ask a higher authority. So he sent a letter to the president of the United States. One month later, Carlos happily wears the uniform of his new charter school and shows off his signed response from Barack Obama. The two developments might not be related, but he's pretty proud of both.
NEWS
June 25, 2013
Teachers rightly complain they are too often blamed for every shortcoming in America's public schools today. It certainly is not teachers' fault that too many schools, especially in big cities, are inadequately funded and staffed to produce the results expected of them. It's also not teachers' fault when colleges gladly pocket education students' tuition and send them out with diplomas and certificates that perpetuate the lie that they are classroom ready. That reality has been corroborated by a new report from the National Council on Teacher Quality that gives high marks to only 9 percent of America's collegiate teacher training programs.
NEWS
June 22, 2013 | By Walter F. Naedele, Inquirer Staff Writer
When Edna Van Liew Bailey became one of the first four teachers granted a sabbatical year by the board of education in Cherry Hill, it was a mixed blessing. In that 1971-72 school year, the first-grade teacher at Malberg Elementary School took classes toward a master's degree in education at what was then Glassboro State College. "Term papers and reading seemed to take up so much of my time, because I'd been away from studying so long," she told an interviewer. "Plus," she said, "the pressure was on," because "my kids were waiting to see my marks!"
NEWS
June 15, 2013 | By Sean Carlin, Inquirer Staff Writer
In an effort to add classrooms to the Knowledge A to Z (KATZ) Academy Charter School in Camden, the city Planning Board approved a proposal Thursday that would eliminate a pool in the Parkside Boys and Girls Club, which houses the school. The school wants to fill in the pool to make room for seven classrooms, bringing its total to 15. The extra classrooms could add 112 students, said Marcella Dalsey, president and cofounder of the charter. The school now has 135 students in the Parkside building and 60 at a former school in the city's Rosedale section.
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