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ENTERTAINMENT
March 3, 2015 | By Patricia Mans, For The Inquirer
At 12, Jimera know she wants to be a teacher, and she already has what it takes to be a good one, beginning with the fact that she loves going to school. Her favorite subjects in fifth grade are English, math, and history, but, truth be told, there isn't a class that she doesn't enjoy. In addition to her own studies, she helps tutor other students in her classroom. The grownups around her describe Jimera as a born leader, intelligent, resilient, and outspoken. Charming, too. Outside school, her activities are wide-ranging, from camping, jumping rope and swimming to singing and dancing.
NEWS
February 12, 2015 | By Kathy Boccella, Inquirer Staff Writer
Only 45 percent of low-income children who eat lunch at school in Pennsylvania also eat a school breakfast, according to a report released Tuesday by a national food research group. Pennsylvania's score was several percentage points below the national average - and New Jersey's - in the School Breakfast Scorecard compiled by the Food Research and Action Center (FRAC). One notable exception, however, is Penn Wood Middle School in Darby Borough, the site of the news conference to discuss the findings.
NEWS
February 9, 2015 | By Kathy Boccella, Inquirer Staff Writer
With lagging student test scores and only about 120 students in grades K-4, Spring City Elementary School three years ago looked more like a candidate for closure than for an extreme makeover. But with the boldness of a Silicon Valley venture capitalist, the Spring-Ford Area School District gambled on a radically different approach to fixing the struggling school near the border of Montgomery and Chester Counties. It spent roughly $300,000 over three years to arm students and their classrooms - even kindergartners - with the latest desktops, iPads, Apple TVs, and smartboards.
NEWS
November 6, 2014
ISSUE | N.J. SPENDING Travel expenses So it appears that, once again, New Jersey politicians are going to be reaching into our wallets to fund transportation projects ("N.J. transportation leader: Lawmakers will find funds for projects," Nov. 1). The transportation fund is $19 billion in debt as a result of their mismanagement. Now they plan an added tax on gasoline. Is it any wonder so many move to more tax-friendly states? |Steven Bockman, Blue Anchor ISSUE | POSTELECTION Open golden door As a lifelong resident of the region, I have encountered countless hardworking immigrants drawn to this country by the same promise of a better life that led my Irish grandparents to these shores.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 28, 2014 | By David Patrick Stearns, Inquirer Music Critic
The Philadelphia Shakespeare Theater may well be the friendliest stage group in town, in the way audiences are greeted and gently indoctrinated into classical theater. As much as that friendliness is appreciated, its production of Henry V walks a line between reinterpretation and trivialization in an updated version that takes place in a modern classroom where a handful of kids reenact the play. It's a 40/60 situation, the larger proportion being the less desirable. Such ideas are often used as framing devices that disappear once the plot kicks in and the actors start playing the characters for real.
NEWS
September 28, 2014 | By Susan Snyder, Inquirer Staff Writer
For professor Randy Weinstein's chemical engineering course at Villanova University, students are supposed to watch on video what has traditionally been the heart of college learning - the lecture - before they show up for class. So he gave them a quiz to make sure they'd done just that. "Everybody watched the carbon-dioxide video," Weinstein said, nodding with satisfaction when he saw that 88 percent of the students answered one of the questions correctly. Weinstein had embedded the video in a 27-minute lecture he recorded for the class - chemical engineering thermodynamics II - from the comfort of his dining room table.
FOOD
September 26, 2014 | By Elisa Ludwig, For The Inquirer
There was a day, not so long ago, when a parent could simply bake up a Funfetti mix and unself-consciously tote a dozen Technicolor-speckled cupcakes to school. Since then, of course, the acceptable choices have narrowed, due to a growing focus on allergies and sensitivities, not to mention general health and behavioral concerns, backed up by school policies and watchful parents. Forget the Funfetti - too much food dye and hydrogenated oils. Eggs and dairy are usually iffy, as is wheat.
SPORTS
August 29, 2014 | BY TOM MAHON, Daily News Staff Writer mahont@phillynews.com
THE NFL wants teachers to use fantasy football to educate young students, according to a recent report. The knee-jerk reaction, of course, is to scoff at what is surely a marketing ploy. But upon further review, the idea has merit. Mark Waller, the chief marketing officer of the NFL, told the Wall Street Journal that the league is interested in helping improving students' math skills. "It's a complex game, fantasy," said Waller. "You should be able to learn a lot, particularly around math.
NEWS
August 25, 2014 | By Andrew Seidman, Inquirer Staff Writer
A Cherry Hill teacher placed on paid leave in 2012 after a secret recording revealed staff members' abusive remarks toward a student will return to the district next month, her lawyer said Friday. A parent had stashed the recording device in his autistic son's pocket to try to learn why the boy had been acting out in school. The incident drew national attention when the father uploaded a 6½-hour recording to YouTube. A judge ruled in May that the surreptitious recording was illegal.
NEWS
July 27, 2014 | By Jonathan Lai, Inquirer Staff Writer
As an alumna who raised six children while attending Camden County College, Eileen Radetich reaches out to the students she sees struggling in her English classes there, sharing her story and offering encouragement. For her work inside and outside the classroom, Radetich received the school's highest teaching honor, the 2014 Lindback Award, the school announced this week. "I frequently tell my students that I was there, especially if it's a nontraditional student . . . especially when they're overwhelmed and they have kids," Radetich said from the Shore, where she was on vacation.
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