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Clean Air Act

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NEWS
April 5, 1990 | By Gabriel Escobar, Daily News Staff Writer
When it comes to air pollution, your car is a major culprit, and that's where the federal Clean Air Act is going to affect most people. Gas station pumps will have to be modified. Fuel systems for cars will have to change. Gasoline will have to change. And, depending on how much is passed on to customers, that is going to cost you. The Senate passed a compromise version of the act Tuesday, and now the attention is focused on the House's tougher proposal. The differences between the two pieces of legislation will eventually have to be reconciled, but this much is certain: The 1970 Clean Air Act will be amended for the first time in 13 years, and it will cost at least $21 billion a year to bring the country into compliance.
NEWS
June 9, 1991 | By Karen McAllister, Special to The Inquirer
A federal Environmental Protection Agency official told local business leaders Thursday that the new Clean Air Act would prove costly to businesses but was necessary to protect the environment. Edwin "Ted" Erickson, EPA's regional administrator, asked local business executives at a forum at Penn State's Great Valley Graduate Center to think about the pollution in Eastern Europe while they weighed the high costs, and imagine what happens to a country without strict environmental regulations.
NEWS
August 15, 1989 | BY TODD GITLIN, From the New York Times
When the Clean Air Act proposed by President Bush was passed in late 1989, few people understood that its extraordinary principle was going to sweep through the civilized world. According to the Clean Air Act, it will be recalled, regions were assigned pollution caps and, accordingly, within each region, each factory was permitted to pollute up to a certain point. Suppose that the Amsludge plant had been assigned the right to pollute 100 units a year but actually polluted only 90 units.
NEWS
June 20, 1988 | By Mark Jaffe, Inquirer Staff Writer
Call it the tale of three cities. In one city, the air is thick with smog. In the second city, they make the cars that in large part make the smog. And in the third city, this city, they make the laws to stop the cars from making the smog. But, for more than 10 years now, Congress has been unable to reauthorize and update the federal Clean Air Act, despite the failure of more than 120 cities - including Philadelphia - to meet federal pollution standards. There are a lot of reasons for the delay.
BUSINESS
June 8, 1992 | By John J. Fried, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The man who identified himself as the lawyer for polluters was seated next to the attorney whose mission in life is, in his words, to defend the public interest. Near them sat the woman representing a Delaware nature group - and she was right across from the representative of a chemical company. But when they and more than 100 other people representing government agencies, industry and environmental organizations left the rooms where they had been talking, they didn't leave blood on the walls.
NEWS
July 2, 1992 | By L. Stuart Ditzen, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
As he signed a 730-page Clean Air Act into law on Nov. 15, 1990, President Bush was ebullient. "This legislation isn't just the centerpiece of our environmental agenda," the President declared. "It is simply the most significant air- pollution legislation in our nation's history. " The President may have been happy to sign the law, but his administration has shown far less enthusiasm in putting it into effect. In the 19 months since the Clean Air Act became law, the Bush administration has missed the deadlines it set for issuing the regulations necessary to make the law work.
NEWS
July 1, 1992
George Bush has just proved who he really listens to when it comes to the tough decisions on clean air. It is not the voters, that's for sure. It is not Congress, which passed anti-pollution laws in 1990. It is not the head of the Environmental Protection Agency, William Reilly, who he appointed. And it is not various and sundry lower-ranking but key officials who advise Mr. Reilly - the general counsels, comptrollers general and assistant attorneys general of this world. No sir. It is the deep-pockets insider lobbyists who work for the guys polluting the air - the Chemical Manufacturers Association, the refiners, the petrochemical fellows and their kin. Pleading economic hardship, they have managed to overturn an EPA rule that would have made them stick to their allowed pollution discharges, or, if they felt the need, apply - publicly - for looser permits.
NEWS
January 6, 1994 | By Mark Jaffe, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Coming to Philadelphia this summer, the next weapon against air pollution - lasers. Aimed at tailpipe fumes, the lasers will identify the most-polluting cars on area highways - and cameras will snap their license plates. Then, the owners of these offending vehicles will get an offer to repair their cars - for free - from the Sun Co. And if they can't be fixed for a few hundred dollars, Sun will offer to buy the cars for scrap. Drivers could take or leave the offer. The planned project is part of a pilot program started last summer by businesses, states and environmental groups in the Northeast to find innovative ways to cope with the Clean Air Act's tough requirements.
NEWS
December 4, 1994 | By Mark Jaffe, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Retribution would be swift and sure. Scuttle Pennsylvania's tough new auto- emissions testing program and feel the pain. That was the federal Environmental Protection Agency's message to the state legislature. But when the legislature went ahead last month and shelved the testing program anyway, the EPA beat a hasty retreat. Environmentalists cried foul. Gas station owners who had lobbied against it heaved a sigh of relief. Legislators said, "We told you so. " What happened?
NEWS
January 27, 1995 | By Glen Justice, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
One might have expected Philadelphia area employers to sigh with relief when the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency relaxed a burdensome clean air mandate this week. Instead, many are holding their breath to see how the situation - which could lead to litigation - unfolds. "It's very difficult to do business in an era of such uncertainty," said Jill Sebest Welch, director of the Delaware County Transportation Management Association. "There have been some mixed messages. " Part of the 1990 Clean Air Act called on states to develop pollution reduction plans, requiring businesses with more than 100 employees to lower the number of cars used for commuting during rush hour by 25 percent.
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NEWS
July 21, 2016 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Staff Writer
Jerry Balter, 94, of Philadelphia, a public interest lawyer who represented poor and minority communities seeking redress from environmental pollution, died of heart failure Saturday, July 16, at Thomas Jefferson University Hospital. Mr. Balter became a lawyer at age 55, relatively late in life, after a career as an industrial engineer in Rochester, N.Y., designing supermarkets. While there, he also became interested in community activism. From that experience, he said, he learned that lawyers skilled at arguing cases in court were often clueless when it came to talking with citizen activists.
NEWS
March 10, 2016
ISSUE | CONGRESS The peoples' work Our GOP-controlled Congress has been called the "Do Nothing Congress. " Last week, the House voted to block indefinitely regulations to the Clean Air Act that would curb hazardous emissions from the making of bricks and clay products. The Senate refused to approve $600 million to deal with addiction to prescription painkillers and heroin, and it refused to fund programs for seniors addicted to pain medicine. The House did approve the naming of the Maya Angelou Memorial Post Office in Winston-Salem, N.C. So, Congress did at least one positive thing.
BUSINESS
July 1, 2015 | By Chris Mondics, Inquirer Staff Writer
In a ruling with wide implication for utilities and regulated industries, the U.S. Supreme Court on Monday blocked Obama administration rules aimed at reducing pollution from coal-fired power plants, saying regulators failed to take cost into account. The court, in a 5-4 opinion, said the Environmental Protection Agency was obligated under the Clean Air Act to weigh the cost at the outset of efforts to cut emissions of mercury and other pollutants. "The agency must consider cost - including, most importantly, cost of compliance - before deciding whether regulation is appropriate and necessary," the court said in its majority opinion, written by Justice Antonin Scalia.
NEWS
October 13, 2014 | Inquirer Editorial Board
Too bad the Federal Trade Commission is limited to ferreting out false advertising in print, television, radio, and the Internet. Just think of the impact if the FTC also regulated truth in legislation, which too often isn't what it appears to be. For example, a bill that sounds as if it would allow Pennsylvania to craft state guidelines to meet new clean-air standards would likely do the opposite. Sadly, the state House passed the bad bill, so the state Senate must kill it. The Greenhouse Gas Regulation Implementation Act is sponsored by State Rep. Pam Snyder (D., Fayette)
NEWS
July 5, 2013
IN HIS SECOND inaugural address, President Obama vowed to "respond to the threat of climate change, knowing that the failure to do so would betray our children and future generations. " Months later, he is making good on the promise. Recognizing that effective climate policy will not pass in a gridlocked Congress, the president outlined his own plan last week that calls on the Environmental Protection Agency to regulate carbon-dioxide emissions from power plants. Carbon pollution is not subject to federal regulation, despite being the main driver of human-induced climate change.
BUSINESS
April 25, 2013 | By Andrew Maykuth, Inquirer Staff Writer
The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency plans a hearing Wednesday in Philadelphia on an Obama administration proposal to clean up gasoline and automobile emissions, one of only two public sessions nationwide on the so-called Tier 3 standards. The rules, which mandate cleaner fuels and some new vehicle technologies, are aimed at reducing soot, sulfur, and nitrogen oxide emissions. "We're looking at automobiles and fuels as a system," said Christopher Grundler, director of the EPA's Office of Transportation and Air Quality.
NEWS
July 19, 2012 | by Walter Tsou M.D
EVER GO OUT on a clear day and smell something bad? Maybe bad enough to make you cough or wheeze? Blame it on fine particulate matter, commonly called soot. Even though you cannot see it, it is still big enough to be trapped in your lungs and tragically, Philadelphians die every year due to breathing in these tiny particles. Soot particles can trigger serious health problems, including asthma and heart attacks, stroke, early death and, as new research suggests, lung cancer.Indeed, little things can have big consequences.
NEWS
April 25, 2012 | By Sandy Bauers, Inquirer Staff Writer
  An American Lung Association report on the nation's air quality has turned up a puzzling blip: In this heavily urbanized region, comparatively rural Chester County has the highest annual average for fine-particle pollution - the sooty stuff that carries chemical pollutants and lodges deep in the lungs. However, the county still meets air quality standards for the pollutant. It's one of many seeming dichotomies found in the report, which is to be released today. Overall, the air we breathe is getting much better.
NEWS
September 28, 2011
With 'TRAIN' bill, people will die As a medical-school student and future physician, I'm disappointed with local U.S. Reps. Jim Gerlach, Patrick Meehan, and Mike Fitzpatrick for their recent votes to perpetuate the terrible myth that public-health safeguards are killing jobs. If it becomes law, H.R. 2401, also known as the TRAIN Act, which passed Friday in the House of Representatives, will yield 175,000 more asthma attacks and more than 25,000 premature deaths in the first year alone, due to smog, soot, and toxic air pollution.
NEWS
September 24, 2011 | Associated Press
WASHINGTON - The Republican-controlled House on Friday took another swipe at the government's ability to control air pollution, passing a bill that would delay or scrap rules to reduce mercury and other harmful air emissions. The 249-169 vote sent the legislation to the Senate, where Environment and Public Works Committee chairwoman Barbara Boxer (D., Calif.) vowed to defeat it. "Let me be clear: This is a train we must stop," Boxer said after House passage. "I will do everything I can to block the rollbacks being pushed by House Republicans and polluters.
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