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Clean Water Act

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NEWS
October 12, 2012
AS THE CLEAN WATER Act turns 40 this week, it is important to recognize the progress it fostered. In 1972, major urban rivers were noxious watercourses. It was normal practice to regard such waters as convenient conveyances to transport wastes of industries and cities, with little regard for ecological and human consequences. The CWA had the ambitious goal of making all waters of the United States "fishable and swimmable. " While we still not have achieved this 100 percent, there has been remarkable transformation.
NEWS
October 30, 1986
The 1986 federal Clean Water Act reauthorization is a popular piece of legislation. How popular? Nobody in Congress voted against it. Even in an election year, that's an almost unheard of endorsement. The bill stands as a landmark piece of environmental legislation that will continue the 14-year-old effort to make America's lakes and streams cleaner. Over the next eight years, it will provide $18 billion for sewage treatment plant construction and programs to halt pollution from urban and agricultural runoff.
NEWS
July 5, 2011
THIS JUST IN: Rivers often cross state boundaries. In fact, some rivers actually are state boundaries. So if hazardous waste were dumped into the Delaware River in, say, Trenton, some of it would almost certainly find its way to Philadelphia. And we likely would have a problem with that. When it comes to water quality, we're all in this together. That's why the Clean Water Act - which sets and mandates the enforcement of national standards for water quality - has been essential to protecting the environment for nearly four decades.
NEWS
March 4, 2010
MANY Americans are too young to remember the days when an American river really did catch on fire, when many waterways were like open sewers and lakes nearly died from pollution. They are too young to remember the dirty days before the 1972 Clean Water Act, signed by that radical environmentalist Richard M. Nixon, led the government to begin the massive task of protecting all "waters of the United States. " The Clean Water Act is a prime example of how prudent government regulation can make a huge difference in the health of the nation's environment and its people.
NEWS
January 25, 1996 | By Mark Jaffe, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
A coalition of environmental groups from Pennsylvania and New Jersey yesterday filed suits in two U.S. district courts charging that the federal Environmental Protection Agency had failed to implement key provisions of the nation's Clean Water Act. At issue is the alleged failure of both state governments to identify portions of streams and rivers that are being damaged or at risk of being damaged by pollution. "These are very big lawsuits, because they touch so many parts of the two states," said Curtis Fisher, program director of the New Jersey Public Interest Research Group, which is one of the plaintiffs.
NEWS
April 11, 1997 | By Kristin E. Holmes, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The settlement of a lawsuit brought against the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency will result in the implementation of a series of wide-ranging programs to identify and restore Pennsylvania's polluted streams and rivers. The more-than-200-page settlement approved Wednesday by a federal judge includes dozens of requirements that must be completed over the next 12 years. "I consider this to be the most important environmental settlement in Pennsylvania history," said James R. May, director of the Widener University School of Law Environmental Law Clinic, which filed the suit on behalf of a coalition of environmental organizations.
NEWS
August 6, 1995 | By Craig LaBan, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
South Jersey's cranberry farmers are a good bet to be winners no matter how the chips fall this summer in the debate on Capitol Hill over environmental regulations. The farmers are rooting for a revision in the Clean Water Act, passed Monday by the House, that would allow them to expand their operations more easily. Cranberries are cultivated in wetlands, using levees to flood low-lying bogs in the winter. Over the last decade, strict wetlands restrictions have limited farm expansion to virtually nothing.
NEWS
November 3, 1986
This is to request that The Inquirer correct a factual error contained in the Oct. 30 editorial "Clean Water Act deserves the President's signature. " Your editorial correctly points out the urgent need for the President to sign the Clean Water Act. As a legislator who has spent a great deal of time and effort on water issues, I welcome The Inquirer's attempt to focus public attention on this area. However, you are factually incorrect in charging me - along with my colleagues Congressmen Bob Roe and Jim Howard - with "silence" in regard to the need to urge President Reagan to sign the Clean Water Act. Less than two weeks ago, I joined Congressmen Roe and Howard in sending a bipartisan letter to the White House, urging the President to sign this important legislation into law. We pointed out that the act is critically important to preserving and improving the quality of our nation's waters, and to achieving an orderly phase-out of the Clean Water Act's Construction Grants Program - one of the largest public works programs in our history.
NEWS
July 2, 1993 | BY SHEILA BALLEN AND CAROLYN HARTMANN
As the long hot summer begins, most of us think about spending a few days at a nearby beach or lake fishing, swimming, boating or surfing. For the less energetic among us, summer signals some time in a lounge chair with feet soaking in a cool stream. Exposure to toxic chemicals or raw sewage is not on most of our minds. Unfortunately, however, the health risks from water pollution are real. Far too many of our waterways are contaminated. The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA)
NEWS
October 31, 2002 | By DAVID MASUR
DISTRACTED BY the Ira Einhorn trial and the Beltway sniper drama around Washington, most Philadelphians were unaware that Oct. 18 marked the 30th anniversary of the federal Clean Water Act. This landmark piece of environmental and public-health legislation is arguably the cornerstone of our nation's environmental policy. Although we have made important strides in water quality since the advent of the Clean Water Act in 1972, we have fallen far short of its goals. Approximately 39 percent of our rivers and 46 percent of our lakes are still too polluted for safe fishing or swimming.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
October 3, 2014 | By Kelly Flynn, Inquirer Staff Writer
Six months after millions of tons of sewage fouled a prime trout stream in Valley Forge National Historical Park, two environmental groups are pursuing legal action against Tredyffrin Township and its municipal authority, saying they violated federal law. In addition to the March spill, the 30-inch pressurized pipeline ruptured in February and in March 2012, and is likely to rupture again, according to the groups, PennEnvironment and Trout Unlimited,...
REAL_ESTATE
July 20, 2014 | By Erin Arvedlund, Inquirer Staff Writer
Roofmeadow founder Charlie Miller and head of operations Melissa Muroff are designing, promoting, and maintaining green roofs all across the Philadelphia area - the 13,000-square-foot green roof at the Barnes Museum, another atop the Granary building in Fairmount. Lately, they've been busy. The Philadelphia Water Department is charged with ensuring compliance with the federal Clean Water Act. PWD developed a "Green City, Clean Waters" program to use so-called green infrastructure to deal with wastewater, instead of underground pipes.
NEWS
July 3, 2014 | By Sandy Bauers, Inquirer Staff Writer
Everyone thought the question had been answered 42 years ago, with passage of the Clean Water Act: What, exactly, are the waters of the United States - waters that warrant government protection to ensure they are drinkable, fishable, and swimmable? Rivers such as the Delaware, regularly plied by cargo ships? Absolutely. The Schuylkill and major tributaries? No debate. But smaller streams? For federal officials, those are muddy waters. Two U.S. Supreme Court decisions, in 2001 and 2006, showed that the regulations were not as clear as the regulators had thought.
NEWS
March 6, 2014 | BY STEVE PAUL
  AS MANY as 300,000 West Virginians are still wondering whether it's safe to drink the water, more than a month after the local supply was tainted by a spill of industrial chemicals. In North Carolina, the full consequences are yet to be determined following the collapse of a pipe last month beneath a utility's coal-ash pond, which spewed tons of the toxic substance into the Dan River. Public health officials have warned residents to avoid river water and to forgo eating any fish.
NEWS
September 25, 2013 | By Sandy Bauers, Inquirer Staff Writer
Ruth Patrick, a pioneering stream ecologist whose work led to the modern environmental movement, died early Monday at age 105. In eight decades of work - she was still coming into her office at the Academy of Natural Sciences of Drexel University when she was 100 - she was summoned by presidents, was a respected adviser to industry, and was an inspiration and beloved mentor to so many young scientists that she was dubbed "the den mother of ecology"...
NEWS
September 25, 2013 | BY JOHN F. MORRISON, Daily News Staff Writer morrisj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5573
WOMEN DIDN'T wear lipstick at the Academy of Natural Sciences in the '30s. In fact, women were scarce in the scientific world in those days, and not really accepted by male-dominated institutions, such as the venerable academy. Maybe as a way to deny that women were even capable of looking into a microscope, displays of feminity in any form were frowned on. However, Ruth Myrtle Patrick soon proved that women were not only the equal of men in science, but, in many cases - hers included - could surpass male accomplishments in many realms and pave their own way to important discoveries.
BUSINESS
July 29, 2013 | By Sandy Bauers, Inquirer Staff Writer
The region's breweries have hit upon a new ingredient for their beers: environmental messaging. Their labels sing the praises of Delaware Bay oysters, pay homage to the headwaters of the Brandywine Creek, and highlight an aquatic insect that survives only in clean water. Many brewers also are donating a portion of the proceeds for stream restoration, land preservation, and other environmental projects. After Hurricane Sandy, it wasn't long before Flying Fish Brewing Co. in Camden County released its Forever Unloved Sandy brew (commonly referred to by its initials - F.U. Sandy)
NEWS
December 27, 2012
Joan Mulhern, 51, a forceful advocate for the environment who lobbied Congress and often rallied public support to sway lawmakers to her cause, died Dec. 18 of liver disease at MedStar Georgetown University Hospital in Washington. Her death was relayed by a sister, Marie Mulhern. Ms. Mulhern had been the senior legislative counsel for Earthjustice, a nonprofit environmental law firm, since 1999. She fought repeated attempts by Congress to limit the scope of the Clean Water Act and battled coal companies and government officials over mountaintop-removal coal mining, in which mountains are blasted away to create strip mines.
NEWS
October 12, 2012
AS THE CLEAN WATER Act turns 40 this week, it is important to recognize the progress it fostered. In 1972, major urban rivers were noxious watercourses. It was normal practice to regard such waters as convenient conveyances to transport wastes of industries and cities, with little regard for ecological and human consequences. The CWA had the ambitious goal of making all waters of the United States "fishable and swimmable. " While we still not have achieved this 100 percent, there has been remarkable transformation.
NEWS
September 17, 2012 | By Kevin Riordan, Inquirer Columnist
The little waterway known as Newton Creek is more than a little . . . complicated. Like Camden County, where it's located. Connecting some of South Jersey's richest and poorest communities as it meanders toward the Delaware River, the six-mile waterway has three main tributaries, feeds four lakes, and serves very different constituencies. It has a Superfund site at one end, a rain garden at the other, and beleaguered, though beloved, parks in between. The lakes are man-made (for which we can thank Franklin Roosevelt)
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