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Clean Water Act

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BUSINESS
June 25, 2016 | By Julie Shaw, Staff Writer
Yuengling brewery has agreed to settle violations of the Clean Water Act, the U.S. Department of Justice announced Thursday. In a consent decree filed Thursday in U.S. District Court in Harrisburg, the Pennsylvania brewery - America's oldest - agreed to spend about $7 million to improve environmental measures and pay a $2.8 million penalty. Federal authorities said D.G. Yuengling and Son Inc., based in Pottsville, Schuylkill County, violated Clean Water Act requirements for companies that discharge industrial waste to municipal publicly owned wastewater-treatment facilities.
NEWS
October 12, 2012
AS THE CLEAN WATER Act turns 40 this week, it is important to recognize the progress it fostered. In 1972, major urban rivers were noxious watercourses. It was normal practice to regard such waters as convenient conveyances to transport wastes of industries and cities, with little regard for ecological and human consequences. The CWA had the ambitious goal of making all waters of the United States "fishable and swimmable. " While we still not have achieved this 100 percent, there has been remarkable transformation.
NEWS
October 30, 1986
The 1986 federal Clean Water Act reauthorization is a popular piece of legislation. How popular? Nobody in Congress voted against it. Even in an election year, that's an almost unheard of endorsement. The bill stands as a landmark piece of environmental legislation that will continue the 14-year-old effort to make America's lakes and streams cleaner. Over the next eight years, it will provide $18 billion for sewage treatment plant construction and programs to halt pollution from urban and agricultural runoff.
NEWS
July 5, 2011
THIS JUST IN: Rivers often cross state boundaries. In fact, some rivers actually are state boundaries. So if hazardous waste were dumped into the Delaware River in, say, Trenton, some of it would almost certainly find its way to Philadelphia. And we likely would have a problem with that. When it comes to water quality, we're all in this together. That's why the Clean Water Act - which sets and mandates the enforcement of national standards for water quality - has been essential to protecting the environment for nearly four decades.
NEWS
March 4, 2010
MANY Americans are too young to remember the days when an American river really did catch on fire, when many waterways were like open sewers and lakes nearly died from pollution. They are too young to remember the dirty days before the 1972 Clean Water Act, signed by that radical environmentalist Richard M. Nixon, led the government to begin the massive task of protecting all "waters of the United States. " The Clean Water Act is a prime example of how prudent government regulation can make a huge difference in the health of the nation's environment and its people.
NEWS
January 25, 1996 | By Mark Jaffe, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
A coalition of environmental groups from Pennsylvania and New Jersey yesterday filed suits in two U.S. district courts charging that the federal Environmental Protection Agency had failed to implement key provisions of the nation's Clean Water Act. At issue is the alleged failure of both state governments to identify portions of streams and rivers that are being damaged or at risk of being damaged by pollution. "These are very big lawsuits, because they touch so many parts of the two states," said Curtis Fisher, program director of the New Jersey Public Interest Research Group, which is one of the plaintiffs.
NEWS
April 11, 1997 | By Kristin E. Holmes, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The settlement of a lawsuit brought against the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency will result in the implementation of a series of wide-ranging programs to identify and restore Pennsylvania's polluted streams and rivers. The more-than-200-page settlement approved Wednesday by a federal judge includes dozens of requirements that must be completed over the next 12 years. "I consider this to be the most important environmental settlement in Pennsylvania history," said James R. May, director of the Widener University School of Law Environmental Law Clinic, which filed the suit on behalf of a coalition of environmental organizations.
NEWS
August 6, 1995 | By Craig LaBan, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
South Jersey's cranberry farmers are a good bet to be winners no matter how the chips fall this summer in the debate on Capitol Hill over environmental regulations. The farmers are rooting for a revision in the Clean Water Act, passed Monday by the House, that would allow them to expand their operations more easily. Cranberries are cultivated in wetlands, using levees to flood low-lying bogs in the winter. Over the last decade, strict wetlands restrictions have limited farm expansion to virtually nothing.
NEWS
November 3, 1986
This is to request that The Inquirer correct a factual error contained in the Oct. 30 editorial "Clean Water Act deserves the President's signature. " Your editorial correctly points out the urgent need for the President to sign the Clean Water Act. As a legislator who has spent a great deal of time and effort on water issues, I welcome The Inquirer's attempt to focus public attention on this area. However, you are factually incorrect in charging me - along with my colleagues Congressmen Bob Roe and Jim Howard - with "silence" in regard to the need to urge President Reagan to sign the Clean Water Act. Less than two weeks ago, I joined Congressmen Roe and Howard in sending a bipartisan letter to the White House, urging the President to sign this important legislation into law. We pointed out that the act is critically important to preserving and improving the quality of our nation's waters, and to achieving an orderly phase-out of the Clean Water Act's Construction Grants Program - one of the largest public works programs in our history.
NEWS
July 2, 1993 | BY SHEILA BALLEN AND CAROLYN HARTMANN
As the long hot summer begins, most of us think about spending a few days at a nearby beach or lake fishing, swimming, boating or surfing. For the less energetic among us, summer signals some time in a lounge chair with feet soaking in a cool stream. Exposure to toxic chemicals or raw sewage is not on most of our minds. Unfortunately, however, the health risks from water pollution are real. Far too many of our waterways are contaminated. The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA)
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BUSINESS
June 25, 2016 | By Julie Shaw, Staff Writer
Yuengling brewery has agreed to settle violations of the Clean Water Act, the U.S. Department of Justice announced Thursday. In a consent decree filed Thursday in U.S. District Court in Harrisburg, the Pennsylvania brewery - America's oldest - agreed to spend about $7 million to improve environmental measures and pay a $2.8 million penalty. Federal authorities said D.G. Yuengling and Son Inc., based in Pottsville, Schuylkill County, violated Clean Water Act requirements for companies that discharge industrial waste to municipal publicly owned wastewater-treatment facilities.
NEWS
May 2, 2016 | By Sandy Bauers, For The Inquirer
The water crisis in Flint, Mich., where residents unknowingly drank water with harmful levels of lead, has brought new scrutiny to public water-supply systems. How does Philadelphia's water rate? Officials will address that question at the Academy of Natural Sciences of Drexel University on Tuesday evening. Debra McCarty, the new commissioner of the Philadelphia Water Department, will be joined by Lynn Thorp, national campaigns director for Clean Water Action, and Jerry Fagliano, chair of the Department of Environmental and Occupational Health at Drexel University's Dornsife School of Public Health.
NEWS
April 16, 2016
By Joseph M. Manko In recent weeks, the issue of safe drinking water has been unusually conspicuous, thanks to headlines emanating from Flint, Mich., and elsewhere. Philadelphians have good reason to be proud of their city's robust tradition of watershed protection and commitment to providing safe, top-quality drinking water. That commitment was first made 200 years ago, when the city's government, business, and community leaders decided on an innovative plan to create a public waterworks system that would guarantee safe drinking water for the citizens of Philadelphia.
NEWS
March 30, 2016 | By Chris Palmer, Staff Writer
A prominent Delaware real estate developer pleaded guilty Monday to bank fraud and violating the federal Clean Water Act during construction of a New Castle housing development, according to the U.S. Attorney's Office in Wilmington. Joseph L. Capano Sr., 74, admitted in U.S. District Court in Wilmington to using more than $146,000 from loans for the Riverbend at Old New Castle project to fund personal expenses, including buying $63,000 worth of jewelry, prosecutors said Monday.
NEWS
January 26, 2016
By Dennis Miranda Most Philadelphia-area residents probably give little thought to the historic waterway to their north that feeds into Fairmount Park and the Schuylkill, or to its connection to the clean drinking water coming out of their faucets. But the city has just entered a partnership to restore this very important waterway, the Wissahickon Creek, and Montgomery County's other municipalities in the watershed should follow suit. The Wissahickon Valley is home to almost a quarter of a million people.
NEWS
January 18, 2016 | VOTERAMA IN CONGRESS
WASHINGTON - Here is how Philadelphia-area members of Congress voted on major issues last week: House Mountaintop-removal coal mining. Voting 235-188, the House on Tuesday passed a GOP-sponsored bill (HR 1644) that would shelve a new federal rule aimed at protecting streams and drinking water from pollution caused by mountaintop-removal coal mining. The rule addresses the practice of companies blasting mountaintops and then dumping fractured rocks and other debris into nearby streams and valleys.
NEWS
December 18, 2015
A Montgomery County businessman was charged Wednesday with violating environmental regulations by discarding water samples that did not meet federal standards and falsifying reports. Federal prosecutors said Matthew Brozena of Telford, president of MAB Environmental Services Inc., violated the Clean Water Act while operating wastewater treatment plants for BC Natural Chicken and Buckingham Valley Nursing Center. Brozena, 58, allegedly instructed his employees to discard water samples that had more pollutants than federal permits allowed and to falsely report test results.
NEWS
June 3, 2015 | Wendy Ruderman, Daily News Staff Writer
IT'S SUNDAY about 7 p.m., a time when most people try to wring out that last drip of relaxation before the start of another workweek. Nope. Not the high-octane "Jim Kenney for Mayor" team. Instead of kicking back, Kenney's campaign spokeswoman, Lauren Hitt, was at her computer, alerting the media to a clean-water advocacy event: "Kenney joins representatives from the EPA, Philadelphia Water Department and PennEnvironment to discuss new, historic clean water protections for Philadelphia.
NEWS
October 3, 2014 | By Kelly Flynn, Inquirer Staff Writer
Six months after millions of tons of sewage fouled a prime trout stream in Valley Forge National Historical Park, two environmental groups are pursuing legal action against Tredyffrin Township and its municipal authority, saying they violated federal law. In addition to the March spill, the 30-inch pressurized pipeline ruptured in February and in March 2012, and is likely to rupture again, according to the groups, PennEnvironment and Trout Unlimited,...
REAL_ESTATE
July 20, 2014 | By Erin Arvedlund, Inquirer Staff Writer
Roofmeadow founder Charlie Miller and head of operations Melissa Muroff are designing, promoting, and maintaining green roofs all across the Philadelphia area - the 13,000-square-foot green roof at the Barnes Museum, another atop the Granary building in Fairmount. Lately, they've been busy. The Philadelphia Water Department is charged with ensuring compliance with the federal Clean Water Act. PWD developed a "Green City, Clean Waters" program to use so-called green infrastructure to deal with wastewater, instead of underground pipes.
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