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Clean Water Act

BUSINESS
July 29, 2013 | By Sandy Bauers, Inquirer Staff Writer
The region's breweries have hit upon a new ingredient for their beers: environmental messaging. Their labels sing the praises of Delaware Bay oysters, pay homage to the headwaters of the Brandywine Creek, and highlight an aquatic insect that survives only in clean water. Many brewers also are donating a portion of the proceeds for stream restoration, land preservation, and other environmental projects. After Hurricane Sandy, it wasn't long before Flying Fish Brewing Co. in Camden County released its Forever Unloved Sandy brew (commonly referred to by its initials - F.U. Sandy)
NEWS
December 27, 2012
Joan Mulhern, 51, a forceful advocate for the environment who lobbied Congress and often rallied public support to sway lawmakers to her cause, died Dec. 18 of liver disease at MedStar Georgetown University Hospital in Washington. Her death was relayed by a sister, Marie Mulhern. Ms. Mulhern had been the senior legislative counsel for Earthjustice, a nonprofit environmental law firm, since 1999. She fought repeated attempts by Congress to limit the scope of the Clean Water Act and battled coal companies and government officials over mountaintop-removal coal mining, in which mountains are blasted away to create strip mines.
NEWS
October 12, 2012
AS THE CLEAN WATER Act turns 40 this week, it is important to recognize the progress it fostered. In 1972, major urban rivers were noxious watercourses. It was normal practice to regard such waters as convenient conveyances to transport wastes of industries and cities, with little regard for ecological and human consequences. The CWA had the ambitious goal of making all waters of the United States "fishable and swimmable. " While we still not have achieved this 100 percent, there has been remarkable transformation.
NEWS
September 17, 2012 | By Kevin Riordan, Inquirer Columnist
The little waterway known as Newton Creek is more than a little . . . complicated. Like Camden County, where it's located. Connecting some of South Jersey's richest and poorest communities as it meanders toward the Delaware River, the six-mile waterway has three main tributaries, feeds four lakes, and serves very different constituencies. It has a Superfund site at one end, a rain garden at the other, and beleaguered, though beloved, parks in between. The lakes are man-made (for which we can thank Franklin Roosevelt)
NEWS
May 21, 2012 | By James Osborne, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Just downstream from an industrial recycling operation and a stone's throw from a sewage treatment plant, a fisherman casts his line toward the passing barge traffic and watches it drop into the Delaware River. A couple eating lunch watch curiously. "No way would I ever eat anything from there," the woman says. The fishers who frequent the pier in Camden's Waterfront South neighborhood have heard it all before. That they're crazy, that they're going to grow an extra head or get sick from eating what they catch.
NEWS
July 31, 2011
While the public's attention has been focused on the irresponsible showdown over raising the nation's debt limit, the Republican House has been conducting a full-scale assault on the nation's environmental laws. It spent last week trying to push through an agency-funding bill that's chock full of changes making it easier for polluters to continue business as usual. The Interior appropriations bill carries more than 40 additional directives, or "riders," that would roll back protections for public health and the environment.
NEWS
July 19, 2011
ARECENT Daily News editorial left out this about hydraulic fracturing: no environmental regulator has linked fracturing to groundwater contamination. At a recent congressional hearing, EPA Administrator Lisa Jackson confirmed while testifying that she was "not aware of any proven case where the fracking process itself has affected water. " Former state Department of Environmental Protection Secretary John Hanger said late last year that Pennsylvania had not had one case in which the fluids used to break off the gas from 5,000 to 8,000 feet underground had returned to contaminate groundwater.
NEWS
July 17, 2011 | VOTERAMA IN CONGRESS
WASHINGTON - Here is how Philadelphia-area members of Congress voted on major issues last week: House National flood insurance. Voting 406-22, the House passed a bill (HR 1309) to renew the taxpayer-subsidized National Flood Insurance Program (NFIP) through 2016 and start key reforms. The bill authorizes the program to add $3 billion in new debt to the $17.8 billion it already owes the Treasury. The program insures about 5.6 million residential and commercial properties located in flood plains in 22,000 communities.
NEWS
July 14, 2011 | Associated Press
WASHINGTON - The Republican-controlled House passed a bill yesterday that would sharply curtail the federal government's role in protecting waters from pollution by barring the Environmental Protection Agency from overruling state decisions on water quality. The bill passed on a 239-184 vote. Sixteen Democrats joined the majority of Republicans in supporting it. The White House threatened to veto the bill, saying that it "would roll back the key provisions . . . that have been the underpinning of 40 years of progress in making the nation's waters fishable, swimmable and drinkable.
NEWS
July 5, 2011
THIS JUST IN: Rivers often cross state boundaries. In fact, some rivers actually are state boundaries. So if hazardous waste were dumped into the Delaware River in, say, Trenton, some of it would almost certainly find its way to Philadelphia. And we likely would have a problem with that. When it comes to water quality, we're all in this together. That's why the Clean Water Act - which sets and mandates the enforcement of national standards for water quality - has been essential to protecting the environment for nearly four decades.
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