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Clean Water Act

NEWS
November 29, 2000 | By Jennifer Moroz, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Already reprimanded by the federal government and facing new pressure from environmental groups, the state said yesterday that it would release a long-overdue federally mandated report detailing the health of New Jersey waterways. Officials at the state Department of Environmental Protection said they were releasing the report, which was due April 1, to the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency yesterday afternoon and would make it available to the public within two weeks. They said attention called to the report's lateness by state environmental groups yesterday had nothing to do with the agency's choice for a release date.
NEWS
November 20, 2000 | By Jennifer Moroz, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Even as it faces pressure to strengthen its plan to clean up New Jersey waterways, the state Department of Environmental Protection has come under new criticism after proposing water-quality standards meant to guide the cleanup. The result of almost four years of department-led "stakeholder" discussions, the standards would define what "clean" is for different waterways and set goals to be met through the state's proposed water-quality and watershed-management rules, which have come under heavy attack.
NEWS
October 18, 2000
Frank LoBiondo of Vineland entered Congress with the fire-breathing Republican class of 1995. He hasn't lost the budget-balancing frugality he displayed then, but he has distinguished himself from the GOP leadership with some gutsy votes on campaign-finance reform and environmental protection. Mr. LoBiondo remains someone who opposes abortion and is friendly with the gun lobby. But his independent thinking on other issues, along with his solid advocacy for South Jersey interests, earns him The Inquirer's nod over Democratic challenger Edward Janosik, a retired political science professor and World War II veteran.
NEWS
October 12, 2000 | By Michelle Malkin
The West Nile virus came to my neck of the woods last week, when four dead crows turned up in southern Maryland and Washington, D.C. Am I scared? Yes, the possible presence of infected mosquitoes in my lakeside neighborhood is worrisome. But even more disturbing is the irrational fear-mongering of environmentalists who oppose chemical spraying to kill the bugs. An outfit called the Maryland Pesticide Network criticized my state's use of permethrin - a common household insecticide - to stop the disease from taking hold.
NEWS
July 25, 2000 | By Karen Masterson, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Emerson Eisele's two-acre pond gets nasty. Sediments from upstream make it shallow. Manure creates high levels of fecal coliform bacteria. And thick algae often kill the fish. He has complained to local authorities, who complained to county officials, who said the New Jersey Department of Environmental Protection was responsible. The department in response inspected the problem and concluded last year that landowners upstream were complying with land-use laws. Eisele, who lives in Upper Pittsgrove, Salem County, does not know where to turn.
NEWS
July 15, 2000
The British & Mumia This is in response to Kevin Patrick Muldowney's letter (July 13) on the Mumia Abu-Jamal situation in relation to members of the British Parliament filing a plea on Mumia's behalf. Muldowney's letter makes it seem as if the Parliament is evil and unjust, while our own judicial system is sound and forthright. There is no difference between the British Parliament's treatment of Northern Ireland, and our own government's use of the death penalty against the lower classes.
NEWS
July 12, 2000 | By Seth Borenstein, INQUIRER WASHINGTON BUREAU
Setting the stage for a major election-season environmental battle, the Clinton administration adopted requirements yesterday cracking down on urban and farm runoff that pollutes waterways. In doing so, the administration defied an act of Congress and practically dared Republicans to shoot down the regulation. In the past, pollution controls have been aimed mainly at sewage treatment plants, factories and other facilities piping pollutants directly into rivers and streams.
NEWS
June 4, 2000
The nastiness of the U.S. Senate race in New Jersey is starting to raise bad memories of the Senate mudfight between Robert Torricelli and Dick Zimmer in '96. And this is still the primary season. Already, voters have been bombarded by tens of millions of dollars in TV advertising - most of it bought by a wealthy political rookie, Democrat Jon S. Corzine. On Tuesday, voters will make the first cut in the record-setting Democratic duel and in the overshadowed battle among four Republicans.
NEWS
November 30, 1998 | By Tanyanika Samuels, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
From the look of the sprawling acres of abandoned farmland overgrown with trees and vegetation, it is difficult to imagine their worth. But an acre of this property is selling for an average of $100,000, and some experts consider that a bargain. The site, which was once used by the Army Corps of Engineers as a dump for waste from dredging and lies next to land being developed for West Deptford's Delaware riverfront project, is being converted into wetlands. The idea is to create an area that compensates for other wetlands destroyed by construction projects.
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