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Clean Water Act

NEWS
January 6, 2002 | By Tom Avril INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Four of the Philadelphia region's 12 watersheds are among the most unhealthful in the country, according to a federal analysis of pollutants, wildlife and geology. The four are ranked six on a scale of one to six, with six being the worst - a dubious honor shared with just 28 other watersheds out of more than 2,200 in the United States. Don't rush to the store for bottled water just yet, however. The ratings from the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency reflect the water in rivers, lakes and streams, not the treated water coming out of the tap. Moreover, two of the region's biggest watersheds, those containing the Schuylkill and lower Delaware River, scored slightly better, with fours.
NEWS
November 7, 2001
The belief of Marlene Z. Asselta, president of the Southern New Jersey Development Council (Nov. 1, "Opposition to cement plant could impede renewal in New Jersey"), collides with reality. What she fails to take into account, as did the state Department of Environmental Protection, is the total maximum daily loading of combined pollutants in Camden. The TMDL factor is applied by scientists to the Clean Water Act, but rarely factored into the equation are the total amounts of pollutants that are airborne.
NEWS
October 30, 2001 | By Kent S. Collins
This is the second in a series of issue debates among New Jersey gubernatorial candidates Bret Schundler, Jim McGreevey and Bill Schluter. The issue today is pollution in New Jersey. These responses are culled from the Townhall E-Debates being hosted on the nonprofit Web site www.e-thepeople.org and co-sponsored by The Inquirer's Citizen Voices project. The questions to which the candidates are responding were generated by a monthlong online discussion among New Jersey voters. To see the full scope of the E-Debates materials, and to post your own responses to the candidates' positions, go to: http://edebates.
NEWS
July 18, 2001 | By Sandy Bauers INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Local environmentalists say the Bush administration's plan to postpone new rules for cleaning the nation's polluted lakes, rivers and streams will accomplish only one thing: dirtier water. The Monday announcement "begins a national retreat on clean water that will result in more delays and weakening of clean-water protections," Bill Wolfe, policy director of the New Jersey Sierra Club, said yesterday. The Bush plan "will absolutely take its toll" on thousands of waterways in Pennsylvania and New Jersey now targeted for cleanup, said Maya van Rossum, of the Delaware Riverkeeper Network.
NEWS
July 16, 2001
AS YOU CAN SEE from this photo, in 1940, FDR Park, then known as League Island Park, resembled Coney Island on a hot summer day. Today, you won't find anyone swimming in the lake. The water is so polluted, swimming is not allowed. Another example of the city's shameful neglect of our parks? It's neglect, all right, but this time, it's human neglect - a problem we've brought on ourselves through ou neglect of the environment. The lakes at FDR Park are tidal, tied to the Delaware River.
NEWS
April 18, 2001
Score one for former New Jersey Gov. Christine Todd Whitman. Whitman, now head of the Environmental Protection Agency, looked like she was going to become the White House doormat after being caught on the losing end of George Bush's flip-flop on carbon dioxide emissions. Yet on Monday, the EPA said it would leave in place rules imposed under the Clinton administration that protects tens of thousands of acres of wetlands. This decision hurts two of Bush's key supporters, developers and homebuilders, who will now have to get permits under the Clean Water Act before they can commence construction that might harm wetlands that help filter our waters.
NEWS
February 16, 2001 | By Kristin E. Holmes, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Two suburban manufacturing companies were charged yesterday with violating the Clean Water Act by illegally discharging pollutants into the environment. Kam Industries Inc., formerly in Warrington Township, Bucks County, and Gas Arc Supply Inc., in Eddystone, Delaware County, were charged by the U.S. Attorney's Office in information filings in U.S. District Court in Philadelphia. An information charge typically means that the parties have agreed to plead guilty. Kam Industries, a maker of steel and aluminum machine parts, allegedly discharged various pollutants into the Warminster Township municipal sewage system between 1995 and 1999.
NEWS
November 29, 2000 | By Jennifer Moroz, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Already reprimanded by the federal government and facing new pressure from environmental groups, the state said yesterday that it would release a long-overdue federally mandated report detailing the health of New Jersey waterways. Officials at the state Department of Environmental Protection said they were releasing the report, which was due April 1, to the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency yesterday afternoon and would make it available to the public within two weeks. They said attention called to the report's lateness by state environmental groups yesterday had nothing to do with the agency's choice for a release date.
NEWS
November 20, 2000 | By Jennifer Moroz, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Even as it faces pressure to strengthen its plan to clean up New Jersey waterways, the state Department of Environmental Protection has come under new criticism after proposing water-quality standards meant to guide the cleanup. The result of almost four years of department-led "stakeholder" discussions, the standards would define what "clean" is for different waterways and set goals to be met through the state's proposed water-quality and watershed-management rules, which have come under heavy attack.
NEWS
October 18, 2000
Frank LoBiondo of Vineland entered Congress with the fire-breathing Republican class of 1995. He hasn't lost the budget-balancing frugality he displayed then, but he has distinguished himself from the GOP leadership with some gutsy votes on campaign-finance reform and environmental protection. Mr. LoBiondo remains someone who opposes abortion and is friendly with the gun lobby. But his independent thinking on other issues, along with his solid advocacy for South Jersey interests, earns him The Inquirer's nod over Democratic challenger Edward Janosik, a retired political science professor and World War II veteran.
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