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Cleanup

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NEWS
April 19, 1989 | By Stephen Keating, Special to The Inquirer
Buried drums of oil waste discovered in August 1986 at the Mobil Oil Corp.' s Paulsboro refinery have not been excavated, and the company and the state Department of Environmental Protection are stalled on beginning cleanup. "We want to clean up the site and the DEP wants us to," said Carole Edwards, spokeswoman for Mobil, "but we want an evenhanded agreement. " Mobil, which employs 900 people and has a daily process capacity of 100,000 barrels of crude oil at the refinery, contends that the administrative consent order for cleanup contains unacceptable legal provisions.
NEWS
January 17, 1986 | By Paul Horvitz, Inquirer Trenton Bureau
Gov. Kean yesterday signed into law a new standard of liability for environmental-cleanup contractors that could allow them to find insurance more easily. Kean signed amendments to the state's Spill Compensation and Control Act that would narrow the standard of liability for the contractors so that they could be sued only for direct cases of negligence. Under the old provisions of the law, contractors and engineers could be held strictly liable for any damages at an environmental-cleanup site, regardless of whether they were at fault.
NEWS
March 12, 1992 | Special to The Inquirer / JONATHAN WILSON
Workers dressed in protective clothing continue demolition of the Lansdowne warehouse whose legacy is radium contamination at more than two dozen Delaware County properties. EPA officials say discarded sand from the warehouse, a radium-processing plant from 1915 to 1925, was used in building materials. Dismantlement began in early February, and the walls will be down in the next two to three days. Other work at the site will continue, however.
NEWS
June 23, 1988 | By Dominic Sama, Inquirer Staff Writer
A cleanup of streets and public areas in business districts of Lower Merion Township will be held Saturday under the auspices of the township and the Main Line Chamber of Commerce. Volunteers from local businesses will conduct the cleanup. In addition, SEPTA will collect debris around two of its commuter-railway stations in the township, said F. Karl Schauffele, chamber president. "Some of our business districts look shabby," Schauffele said. "We need help to ensure that all Lower Merion business areas will be inviting and attractive areas to visit, work and shop.
NEWS
June 9, 2010 | By Darran Simon, Inquirer Staff Writer
Mayor Dana L. Redd on Tuesday initiated the Camden Clean Campaign, a citywide effort to improve neighborhoods. Wachovia and PNC Banks provided most of the campaign's funding with a combined donation of $30,000. The city has been working with residents to designate lots and parks for cleanup and to set dates. Redd said trash "came up over and over" as an issue during her mayoral campaign last fall and that she had "promised to do something about it. " "Our quality of life is being affected," Redd said.
NEWS
May 8, 2002
SATURDAY, May 18, is the date of the official Fairmount Park cleanup, the "7th annual Philadelphia Cares About Fairmount Park Day. " But we're hoping that Thursday, May 16, also represents a cleanup of sorts - of the Fairmount Park Commission. That's the day that Common Pleas Court judges vote on concurrent five-year terms for 10 members of the commission. This year's selection has garnered unprecedented attention, and an unprecedented number of candidates: Eight incumbents who want to remain and 35 new candidates.
NEWS
February 17, 1986 | By Mark Butler, Inquirer Staff Writer
Preparations for cleaning up of portions of the Paoli railyard that are contaminated with toxic chemicals are expected to begin Feb. 24. How that effort will be funded may be decided in federal court, according to a spokesman for the Environmental Protection Agency. An EPA report made public Jan. 30 shows that levels of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) in the rail complex and repair facility and on six adjacent residential properties have risen since tests were first conducted on those sites in 1979.
NEWS
March 12, 1989 | By Rita M. Sutter, Special to The Inquirer
It has been nine months since Burlington County residents joined members of the ecumenical Christian housing ministry Habitat for Humanity for a walk from Maine to Atlanta, stopping briefly in Mount Holly for a formal dedication of a simple rowhouse. On Saturday, the group hopes to begin cleanup of that house. Volunteers and clergy members came out to the First Presbyterian Church Tuesday night in the icy aftermath of Mount Holly's second winter storm to plan the cleanup. Built about a century ago, 36 White St. is an unassuming rowhouse.
NEWS
June 5, 1988 | By Ellen Pulver, Special to The Inquirer
When the cleanup of the radiation-contaminated twin home at 105-107 E. Stratford Ave. in Lansdowne Borough is completed sometime in April 1989, officials expect the property to be "a nice, flat, grassy lot. " That is the situation envisioned by Ray Huston, a project manager with Chem-Nuclear Systems of Columbia, S. C., the company that has been awarded a $6 million contract by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers for the piece-by-piece removal of...
NEWS
May 2, 1990 | By Dave Bittan, Daily News Staff Writer
East Germantown's Concerned Citizens are claiming at least a partial victory in their battle to force a church to stop contaminating their neighborhood by leasing a vacant lot to bus and truck operators. Hours after the citizens - wearing surgical masks and carrying signs - picketed the lot yesterday, the city Health Department cited the Corinthian Baptist Church for dumping human waste and trash on the 3.5-acre lot it owns at 21st Street and Godfrey Avenue. The church was warned to clean it within 10 days or face further action.
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NEWS
April 19, 2014 | By Jacqueline L. Urgo, Inquirer Staff Writer
They call it the Roster of the Ridiculous, a list including a dirty dozen of the crazy - and disgusting - pieces of marine debris collected during annual Jersey Shore beach cleanups. So on Thursday, as the Sandy Hook-based environmental advocacy group Clean Ocean Action invited thousands of volunteers to come out for its 29th annual spring Beach Sweeps on April 26, the group highlighted some of past years' "finds" from Raritan Bay down to Cape May. Plastics and cigarette filters account for most of the debris, but over the years, the slew of odd items littering the beach has included a Port-a-Potty, refrigerators, grave markers, rubber alligators, a large rubber fish, a life-size plastic policeman, the head of a Yoda doll from Star Wars , a shopping cart, and a variety of intact fresh fruit, including a watermelon.
NEWS
April 7, 2014 | By Jonathan Lai, Inquirer Staff Writer
PHILADELPHIA The mean streets of Philadelphia? Do you mean the clean streets of Philadelphia? Nearly 20,000 volunteers joined in the seventh annual Philly Spring Cleanup on Saturday, organizers said. "We want to start off cleaning season with a bang," said Donald Carlton, deputy commissioner of the city's Streets Department. "We put our best foot forward. . . . We want to do something symbolic. " The symbolism included Mayor Nutter, officials from various sponsoring groups, and Connor Barwin, an outside linebacker for the Eagles.
SPORTS
April 3, 2014 | BY RYAN LAWRENCE, Daily News Staff Writer rlawrence@phillynews.com
ARLINGTON, Texas - Before last night, the last time Ryan Howard started a game and didn't hit cleanup, the Phillies were in the midst of a 27-year World Series drought. On June 29, 2008, Greg Dobbs was the designated hitter and Jayson Werth hit eighth. Marlon Byrd was in the other dugout, playing for a Rangers team that started Vicente Padilla a night earlier. Last night, during the Phillies' first trip to Arlington since that midsummer interleague series in 2008, Howard was out of the cleanup spot.
NEWS
April 1, 2014 | By Stephan Salisbury, Inquirer Staff Writer
They don't call it Mud Island for nothing. On Sunday, two days of rain and drizzle had left widening pools and fields of shoe-sucking muck in and around Fort Mifflin on the Delaware River. No one at the fort cared, it seemed. Certainly not the more than 40 volunteers who swarmed the place as the British never did. They were intent on cleaning and polishing and ripping out burned and bedraggled building elements, casting all debris into growing piles of soggy timbers and woebegone insulation.
NEWS
March 9, 2014 | By Andrew Seidman, Inquirer Trenton Bureau
Federal auditors have found that the Christie administration complied with state and federal standards in issuing a no-bid contract to a Florida firm tasked with cleaning up debris in the aftermath of Hurricane Sandy. In the interest of speed, New Jersey awarded a six-month contract to AshBritt Inc. two days after Sandy made landfall to clean up the hundreds of thousands of tons of debris at the Shore. Democrats held hearings on the subject last year, attacking Gov. Christie for hiring a politically connected firm that they suggested was overcharging for its work.
NEWS
March 6, 2014 | By Angelo Fichera, Inquirer Staff Writer
LOGAN TWP. An environmental advocacy group contends that a soil-recycling company's Logan Township facility is jeopardizing public health by improperly processing its materials. The Delaware Riverkeeper Network alleges that Soil Safe has failed to correct the purported offenses despite an October notice of intent to sue by the organization, according to the group's complaint, filed in U.S. District Court on Monday. Soil Safe, which recycles petroleum-contaminated soil, provides remediated soil to the nearby equestrian facility run by the Gloucester County Improvement Authority known as DREAM Park.
NEWS
March 1, 2014 | By Andrew Seidman, Inquirer Trenton Bureau
TRENTON - One of the first things Senate President Stephen Sweeney explains to constituents, voters, and reporters is his background as a union ironworker. It's a fundamental component of his personal biography, as well as his political persona: He's a blue-collar Pennsauken guy who didn't go to college but knows how to "get things done. " "You look at the skyline of Philadelphia, you see those buildings, those are ironworkers who put those up," Sweeney (D., Gloucester) said Thursday during an interview in his Senate office.
NEWS
February 17, 2014 | BY JENNY DeHUFF, Daily News Staff Writer dehuffj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5218
PHILADELPHIA'S fifth snowiest winter in history has kept the Streets Department busy and it won't stop this weekend, Mayor Nutter said yesterday. The season's storms have broken a 130-year-old record for the most 6-inch-plus snowfalls. The snowfall tally so far is 54.8 inches. The snow emergency declared at 8 p.m. Wednesday was lifted at 2 p.m. yesterday. In the meantime, 363 cars were towed from snow-emergency routes so plows could clean up. And more snow is on the way. The forecast called for snow early today, mixed with rain in the afternoon before changing back into snow at nighttime.
NEWS
February 17, 2014 | By Rita Giordano, Inquirer Staff Writer
VOORHEES The neighbors of Kirkwood Lake may have just caught a ray of hope. For years, homeowners around the Camden County lake have watched in dismay as it has grown shallower and shallower. Other than seasonally attacking the vegetation that grows virulently in the warmer months, there has seemed to be little they could do to save their lake. The reason: The lake, bordered by Voorhees and Lindenwold, is part of a federal Superfund site cluster - several miles of land and waterways contaminated by paint-makers that operated in the area from the mid-1800s until the late 1970s.
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