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Cleanup

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NEWS
April 19, 1989 | By Stephen Keating, Special to The Inquirer
Buried drums of oil waste discovered in August 1986 at the Mobil Oil Corp.' s Paulsboro refinery have not been excavated, and the company and the state Department of Environmental Protection are stalled on beginning cleanup. "We want to clean up the site and the DEP wants us to," said Carole Edwards, spokeswoman for Mobil, "but we want an evenhanded agreement. " Mobil, which employs 900 people and has a daily process capacity of 100,000 barrels of crude oil at the refinery, contends that the administrative consent order for cleanup contains unacceptable legal provisions.
NEWS
January 17, 1986 | By Paul Horvitz, Inquirer Trenton Bureau
Gov. Kean yesterday signed into law a new standard of liability for environmental-cleanup contractors that could allow them to find insurance more easily. Kean signed amendments to the state's Spill Compensation and Control Act that would narrow the standard of liability for the contractors so that they could be sued only for direct cases of negligence. Under the old provisions of the law, contractors and engineers could be held strictly liable for any damages at an environmental-cleanup site, regardless of whether they were at fault.
NEWS
March 12, 1992 | Special to The Inquirer / JONATHAN WILSON
Workers dressed in protective clothing continue demolition of the Lansdowne warehouse whose legacy is radium contamination at more than two dozen Delaware County properties. EPA officials say discarded sand from the warehouse, a radium-processing plant from 1915 to 1925, was used in building materials. Dismantlement began in early February, and the walls will be down in the next two to three days. Other work at the site will continue, however.
NEWS
June 23, 1988 | By Dominic Sama, Inquirer Staff Writer
A cleanup of streets and public areas in business districts of Lower Merion Township will be held Saturday under the auspices of the township and the Main Line Chamber of Commerce. Volunteers from local businesses will conduct the cleanup. In addition, SEPTA will collect debris around two of its commuter-railway stations in the township, said F. Karl Schauffele, chamber president. "Some of our business districts look shabby," Schauffele said. "We need help to ensure that all Lower Merion business areas will be inviting and attractive areas to visit, work and shop.
NEWS
June 9, 2010 | By Darran Simon, Inquirer Staff Writer
Mayor Dana L. Redd on Tuesday initiated the Camden Clean Campaign, a citywide effort to improve neighborhoods. Wachovia and PNC Banks provided most of the campaign's funding with a combined donation of $30,000. The city has been working with residents to designate lots and parks for cleanup and to set dates. Redd said trash "came up over and over" as an issue during her mayoral campaign last fall and that she had "promised to do something about it. " "Our quality of life is being affected," Redd said.
NEWS
May 8, 2002
SATURDAY, May 18, is the date of the official Fairmount Park cleanup, the "7th annual Philadelphia Cares About Fairmount Park Day. " But we're hoping that Thursday, May 16, also represents a cleanup of sorts - of the Fairmount Park Commission. That's the day that Common Pleas Court judges vote on concurrent five-year terms for 10 members of the commission. This year's selection has garnered unprecedented attention, and an unprecedented number of candidates: Eight incumbents who want to remain and 35 new candidates.
NEWS
February 17, 1986 | By Mark Butler, Inquirer Staff Writer
Preparations for cleaning up of portions of the Paoli railyard that are contaminated with toxic chemicals are expected to begin Feb. 24. How that effort will be funded may be decided in federal court, according to a spokesman for the Environmental Protection Agency. An EPA report made public Jan. 30 shows that levels of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) in the rail complex and repair facility and on six adjacent residential properties have risen since tests were first conducted on those sites in 1979.
NEWS
March 12, 1989 | By Rita M. Sutter, Special to The Inquirer
It has been nine months since Burlington County residents joined members of the ecumenical Christian housing ministry Habitat for Humanity for a walk from Maine to Atlanta, stopping briefly in Mount Holly for a formal dedication of a simple rowhouse. On Saturday, the group hopes to begin cleanup of that house. Volunteers and clergy members came out to the First Presbyterian Church Tuesday night in the icy aftermath of Mount Holly's second winter storm to plan the cleanup. Built about a century ago, 36 White St. is an unassuming rowhouse.
NEWS
June 5, 1988 | By Ellen Pulver, Special to The Inquirer
When the cleanup of the radiation-contaminated twin home at 105-107 E. Stratford Ave. in Lansdowne Borough is completed sometime in April 1989, officials expect the property to be "a nice, flat, grassy lot. " That is the situation envisioned by Ray Huston, a project manager with Chem-Nuclear Systems of Columbia, S. C., the company that has been awarded a $6 million contract by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers for the piece-by-piece removal of...
NEWS
May 2, 1990 | By Dave Bittan, Daily News Staff Writer
East Germantown's Concerned Citizens are claiming at least a partial victory in their battle to force a church to stop contaminating their neighborhood by leasing a vacant lot to bus and truck operators. Hours after the citizens - wearing surgical masks and carrying signs - picketed the lot yesterday, the city Health Department cited the Corinthian Baptist Church for dumping human waste and trash on the 3.5-acre lot it owns at 21st Street and Godfrey Avenue. The church was warned to clean it within 10 days or face further action.
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NEWS
January 31, 2016 | By Julie Shaw, Staff Writer
Authorities now believe that a majority of the 4,200 gallons of diesel fuel that leaked from a generator spilled into the Schuylkill River, but are still confident that there is no threat to drinking water, fish or wildlife. Also, while the Schuylkill River Trail remains closed during the day, it has opened to the public in the evening, after cleanup crews have left for the day. On Friday, workers from Miller Environmental Group, the company contracted to do the cleanup, were still recovering oil from the river.
NEWS
January 28, 2016 | By Julie Shaw, STAFF WRITER
Authorities on Tuesday identified the source of a diesel-fuel spill that leaked about 250 gallons of oil into the Schuylkill River. A portion of the Schuylkill River Trail remained closed Tuesday while crews continued the cleanup effort. The spill occurred when a sensor in an outdoor, covered generator on the 2400 block of Market Street malfunctioned, said Nick Ameen, a spokesman for the U.S. Coast Guard, the lead agency in the cleanup. The generator is owned by a company called CenturyLink, a communications and IT company, Ameen said.
NEWS
January 27, 2016 | BY JASON NARK, Staff Writer
WEST WILDWOOD, N.J. - On the way to the Jersey Shore, they say, the stress just melts away. They must not have seen Andrew Runowski spraying the mud off the bicycles parked in his West Wildwood driveway Monday afternoon. Runowski, 32, had awakened early amid the mounds of snow in South Philly and had driven here expecting the worst. Floodwaters from Winter Storm Jonas blew through the garage door of his elevated home near the bay in this Cape May County borough, and everything was wet and doused in brown, the salty water already eating its way through important things.
NEWS
January 27, 2016 | By Robert Moran, STAFF WRITER
About 200 gallons of home heating oil spilled into the Schuylkill Monday morning, resulting in the closure of the river trail in Philadelphia between Market and Locust Streets, officials said. A total of 4,200 gallons of oil spilled sometime before 9:30 a.m. from a tank at 2400 Market St., crossing CSX property and the Schuylkill River Trail before partially draining into the river, officials said. The popular trail was closed in the area as the spill was assessed and then the cleanup began, the state Department of Environmental Protection reported.
NEWS
January 27, 2016 | By Jacqueline L. Urgo, Michael Boren, and Maddie Hanna, STAFF WRITERS
STONE HARBOR, N.J. - While state officials surveyed the damage Monday left along the New Jersey Shore by a fierce weekend snowstorm, Gov. Christie was pelted for a second day with criticism of his assessment of the impact on the coast. "I don't know what you expect me to do. You want me to go down there with a mop?" Christie replied to a question from a young woman in New Hampshire who said she was speaking on behalf of relatives in New Jersey. She asked why he was there campaigning while New Jersey was still cleaning up from the storm.
NEWS
January 17, 2016 | By Jan Hefler, Staff Writer
A Gloucester County family that acquired a contaminated thermometer plant and converted it into a day care center, exposing children to toxins, must contribute toward the $2 million cleanup cost and $4 million in damages, a New Jersey appeals panel ruled this week. The panel upheld a 2014 Superior Court ruling that James Sullivan III and his siblings are liable for the cost the state incurred when it shut the Kiddie Kollege building in Franklin Township, demolished it, and cleaned up the site.
NEWS
October 23, 2015 | By Mari A. Schaefer, Inquirer Staff Writer
Linda Jeffers looked over the spring roll she ordered. "I don't see any bugs," she said drily to two friends as she bit into her appetizer. "Of course, we wouldn't know; they could be crunchy. " And with that joke, the ice was broken, and the three lunch partners seemed delighted to be back at a favorite Main Line haunt, Yangming Restaurant, which opened Wednesday for the first time since it was shut down for health violations two months ago. The three were among about 45 customers who showed up for lunch after the restaurant opened at 11:30 a.m. Wednesday.
NEWS
October 22, 2015 | By Mari A. Schaefer, Inquirer Staff Writer
Longtime customer Sandy McKenna marched into Yangming Restaurant on Tuesday as if she owned the place and demanded to see the kitchen. "I am the scout," she announced, with an air of confidence and a wave of her hand. On behalf of more reluctant friends, she came to see for herself whether the popular Main Line eatery - closed since August for major health violations - had cleaned up its act. Alan Huynh, the general manager, hesitated - even though, at a news conference moments before McKenna arrived, he promised to show the kitchen to anyone who asked.
NEWS
August 1, 2015 | By Justine McDaniel and Michaelle Bond, Inquirer Staff Writers
Two things coexisted peacefully Thursday afternoon inside the West Chester University library - senior Janna Wilson and, in the cooling system, the bacteria that cause Legionnaire's disease. "I'm not worried," said Wilson, studying a day after officials notified the campus community that an employee had contracted the disease and that eight campus buildings - including the one that houses the library - had unacceptable levels of the Legionella bacteria. The positive tests for the bacteria do not necessarily mean the employee got it at the university or that others are at risk, experts said.
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