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Cleanup

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NEWS
April 19, 1989 | By Stephen Keating, Special to The Inquirer
Buried drums of oil waste discovered in August 1986 at the Mobil Oil Corp.' s Paulsboro refinery have not been excavated, and the company and the state Department of Environmental Protection are stalled on beginning cleanup. "We want to clean up the site and the DEP wants us to," said Carole Edwards, spokeswoman for Mobil, "but we want an evenhanded agreement. " Mobil, which employs 900 people and has a daily process capacity of 100,000 barrels of crude oil at the refinery, contends that the administrative consent order for cleanup contains unacceptable legal provisions.
NEWS
June 9, 2010 | By Darran Simon, Inquirer Staff Writer
Mayor Dana L. Redd on Tuesday initiated the Camden Clean Campaign, a citywide effort to improve neighborhoods. Wachovia and PNC Banks provided most of the campaign's funding with a combined donation of $30,000. The city has been working with residents to designate lots and parks for cleanup and to set dates. Redd said trash "came up over and over" as an issue during her mayoral campaign last fall and that she had "promised to do something about it. " "Our quality of life is being affected," Redd said.
NEWS
January 17, 1986 | By Paul Horvitz, Inquirer Trenton Bureau
Gov. Kean yesterday signed into law a new standard of liability for environmental-cleanup contractors that could allow them to find insurance more easily. Kean signed amendments to the state's Spill Compensation and Control Act that would narrow the standard of liability for the contractors so that they could be sued only for direct cases of negligence. Under the old provisions of the law, contractors and engineers could be held strictly liable for any damages at an environmental-cleanup site, regardless of whether they were at fault.
NEWS
March 12, 1992 | Special to The Inquirer / JONATHAN WILSON
Workers dressed in protective clothing continue demolition of the Lansdowne warehouse whose legacy is radium contamination at more than two dozen Delaware County properties. EPA officials say discarded sand from the warehouse, a radium-processing plant from 1915 to 1925, was used in building materials. Dismantlement began in early February, and the walls will be down in the next two to three days. Other work at the site will continue, however.
NEWS
June 23, 1988 | By Dominic Sama, Inquirer Staff Writer
A cleanup of streets and public areas in business districts of Lower Merion Township will be held Saturday under the auspices of the township and the Main Line Chamber of Commerce. Volunteers from local businesses will conduct the cleanup. In addition, SEPTA will collect debris around two of its commuter-railway stations in the township, said F. Karl Schauffele, chamber president. "Some of our business districts look shabby," Schauffele said. "We need help to ensure that all Lower Merion business areas will be inviting and attractive areas to visit, work and shop.
NEWS
May 8, 2002
SATURDAY, May 18, is the date of the official Fairmount Park cleanup, the "7th annual Philadelphia Cares About Fairmount Park Day. " But we're hoping that Thursday, May 16, also represents a cleanup of sorts - of the Fairmount Park Commission. That's the day that Common Pleas Court judges vote on concurrent five-year terms for 10 members of the commission. This year's selection has garnered unprecedented attention, and an unprecedented number of candidates: Eight incumbents who want to remain and 35 new candidates.
NEWS
February 17, 1986 | By Mark Butler, Inquirer Staff Writer
Preparations for cleaning up of portions of the Paoli railyard that are contaminated with toxic chemicals are expected to begin Feb. 24. How that effort will be funded may be decided in federal court, according to a spokesman for the Environmental Protection Agency. An EPA report made public Jan. 30 shows that levels of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) in the rail complex and repair facility and on six adjacent residential properties have risen since tests were first conducted on those sites in 1979.
NEWS
March 12, 1989 | By Rita M. Sutter, Special to The Inquirer
It has been nine months since Burlington County residents joined members of the ecumenical Christian housing ministry Habitat for Humanity for a walk from Maine to Atlanta, stopping briefly in Mount Holly for a formal dedication of a simple rowhouse. On Saturday, the group hopes to begin cleanup of that house. Volunteers and clergy members came out to the First Presbyterian Church Tuesday night in the icy aftermath of Mount Holly's second winter storm to plan the cleanup. Built about a century ago, 36 White St. is an unassuming rowhouse.
NEWS
June 5, 1988 | By Ellen Pulver, Special to The Inquirer
When the cleanup of the radiation-contaminated twin home at 105-107 E. Stratford Ave. in Lansdowne Borough is completed sometime in April 1989, officials expect the property to be "a nice, flat, grassy lot. " That is the situation envisioned by Ray Huston, a project manager with Chem-Nuclear Systems of Columbia, S. C., the company that has been awarded a $6 million contract by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers for the piece-by-piece removal of...
NEWS
May 2, 1990 | By Dave Bittan, Daily News Staff Writer
East Germantown's Concerned Citizens are claiming at least a partial victory in their battle to force a church to stop contaminating their neighborhood by leasing a vacant lot to bus and truck operators. Hours after the citizens - wearing surgical masks and carrying signs - picketed the lot yesterday, the city Health Department cited the Corinthian Baptist Church for dumping human waste and trash on the 3.5-acre lot it owns at 21st Street and Godfrey Avenue. The church was warned to clean it within 10 days or face further action.
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NEWS
August 7, 2014 | By Angelo Fichera, Inquirer Staff Writer
Gloucester County freeholders are scheduled to consider a resolution Wednesday opposing the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's recently announced plan to address a contaminated site in Newfield. The proposed resolution calls the EPA's proposal "unacceptable," while asking the federal agency and state to do a full remediation. "There's no trust that anything good is going to come of this unless it's properly taken care of," Freeholder Deputy Director Giuseppe "Joe" Chila said Tuesday.
SPORTS
August 7, 2014 | BY RYAN LAWRENCE, Daily News Staff Writer rlawrence@phillynews.com
In the span of two weeks, Ryan Howard has gone from banished to the bench for a series worth of games to a near-permanent place in the middle of the struggling Phillies lineup. Entering play on Tuesday, the Phils had not scored a run since Friday. Manager Ryne Sandberg didn't do any tinkering, however, keeping Howard, mired in an 0-for-14 skid, and Chase Utley, in the midst of an 0-for-16 slump, in their usual spots in the lineup. It's at least somewhat surprising that Sandberg, who sat a slumping Howard on the last homestand, hasn't moved the first baseman out of the fourth spot in the order.
NEWS
July 25, 2014 | By Clark Mindock, Inquirer Staff Writer
SEASIDE HEIGHTS, N.J. - A two-day drive from home, they came on buses from across the country. They watched as the cornfields of rural America morphed into the lush, deciduous trees separating major East Coast cities. A series of "Welcome to" signs slipped by until their buses came to the end of the line - the Atlantic Ocean, something that many of the volunteers with Lutheran Social Ministries last week had never seen before. They weren't in Nebraska anymore. It was the Jersey Shore.
REAL_ESTATE
July 13, 2014 | By Alan J. Heavens, Inquirer Real Estate Writer
Joe Ponessa, who spent 25 years as a housing, indoor environment and health specialist at Rutgers Cooperative Extension, responded to a recent column about mold testing. He said much of what he knows about mold remediation comes from associating with some of the top mold people in the country. Concerning testing, he said the sentiment is generally against it: "If you can see and/or smell mold, it's there. " Testing provides little practical information, although there are some occasions when it is justified: lawsuit evidence, doctor's request, validation of the effectiveness of a large, expensive cleanup, etc. The most meaningful testing, air sampling, is expensive.
NEWS
May 31, 2014 | By Jan Hefler, Inquirer Staff Writer
A New Jersey Superior Court judge has ordered the multiple owners of a building that had housed a contaminated thermometer factory and then was converted into a day-care center known as Kiddie Kollege to pay a total of $6.13 million for the cleanup they failed to do and for punitive damages. More than 100 infants and children were exposed to mercury vapors in the day-care center for up to 18 months after it opened in Franklin Township, Gloucester County, in 2004. After the story grabbed national attention, changes were made in New Jersey and elsewhere and day-care facilities were subject to more thorough inspections.
NEWS
May 29, 2014 | By Jan Hefler, Inquirer Staff Writer
The goats are not coming. That is, the 70 goats from Maryland that were supposed to arrive in Mount Holly this week to eat the ivy that is smothering trees and shrubs at a woodland park affectionately known as the Mount. Normally, the herd indiscriminately consumes leaves, twigs, and other things found in nature. But it won't make a dent in the thick carpet of ivy that has spread across the Mount, says Brian Knox, owner of Eco-Goats, which bills itself as an environmentally friendly vegetation control service.
NEWS
May 10, 2014 | By Vernon Clark, Inquirer Staff Writer
A week after some of the worst flooding in the area in recent memory, the Schuylkill is ready to host the largest collegiate rowing competition in the country, the Dad Vail Regatta. Friday and Saturday's competition comes after crews spent nearly a week clearing tons of debris along the Kelly and Martin Luther King Jr. Drives and from the swollen river itself. "We've been working on the cleanup since the storm last week," Mark Focht, Philadelphia's first deputy commissioner for parks and recreation, said Thursday.
NEWS
May 4, 2014 | By Michaelle Bond, Laura McCrystal, and Allison Steele, Inquirer Staff Writers
Ryan Houck was at work at Tri-Tech Automotive on Jefferson Avenue in Downingtown when he saw the water approaching from down the street Wednesday. Within minutes, the flood was at his feet. "I felt like I was on the Titanic," said Houck, 27. "The water started coming in the doors. " Houck and Tri-Tech owner Lee Captis spent Friday the way many residents did who live and work in flood-prone areas around the region: cleaning mud from the walls and floor. With the water receding and the sun shining - finally - officials and residents were left with assessing the damage from the record-setting rains that swamped the region this week.
NEWS
May 3, 2014 | By Michaelle Bond and Laura McCrystal, Inquirer Staff Writers
By the time commuters were getting ready to venture home Wednesday, a colossal traffic jam already was developing - in the atmosphere. A cluster of showers moved into the Philadelphia region at midafternoon, and then, "it just kind of stopped," said Valerie Meola at the National Weather Service in Mount Holly. The result was the region's wettest spring day in 142 years of record-keeping, widespread major flooding along suddenly chocolate-brown waterways, a rash of water rescues, streets more suitable for kayaks than cars, and prodigious cleanup chores likely to lap into the first weekend of May. More than a half-foot of rain - or two months' worth - fell on some areas, and flood warnings remained posted for the Schuylkill from Philadelphia to the Norristown area, the site of major flooding, into Thursday afternoon.
NEWS
April 19, 2014 | By Jacqueline L. Urgo, Inquirer Staff Writer
They call it the Roster of the Ridiculous, a list including a dirty dozen of the crazy - and disgusting - pieces of marine debris collected during annual Jersey Shore beach cleanups. So on Thursday, as the Sandy Hook-based environmental advocacy group Clean Ocean Action invited thousands of volunteers to come out for its 29th annual spring Beach Sweeps on April 26, the group highlighted some of past years' "finds" from Raritan Bay down to Cape May. Plastics and cigarette filters account for most of the debris, but over the years, the slew of odd items littering the beach has included a Port-a-Potty, refrigerators, grave markers, rubber alligators, a large rubber fish, a life-size plastic policeman, the head of a Yoda doll from Star Wars , a shopping cart, and a variety of intact fresh fruit, including a watermelon.
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