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NEWS
January 9, 1991 | By Jean Redstone, Special to The Inquirer
The real estate transaction that took place in Woodbury on Friday closed the 10-year attempt by Gloucester County College to sell the historical Benjamin Clark house in Deptford. At the closing, ownership of the Revolutionary War-era home passed from the college to Thomas and Candace Beach of Mount Laurel, who paid $211,002, the highest of eight bids the college received after placing the house on the market in September. The Flemish brick home, built in 1750 by farmer Benjamin Clark, was deeded to the college in 1974 by the developers who built the Tall Pines Village on the surrounding farmland.
NEWS
August 31, 2010 | By Jacqueline L. Urgo, Inquirer Staff Writer
STAFFORD TOWNSHIP, N.J. - It's known simply as "the shack. " The rough-hewn duck-hunting cabin, located off eastbound Route 72 on the causeway to Long Beach Island, has been pondered, painted, and photographed. So decrepit locals marvel it survived the brutal winter, the beloved landmark fashioned from cedar and pine boards seven or eight decades ago is a reminder of when the Ocean County Shore destination was an enclave of humble cottages and fishing shanties. Alarm over the shack's fate hit like a wave last year when the property adjacent to it, a tidal mudflat on the Barnegat Bay islet known as Cedar Bonnet Island, changed hands.
NEWS
November 3, 2000 | by Mark McDonald and Earni Young, Daily News Staff Writers
In a severe case of biting the hand that feeds you, almost one third of the Wissinoming homeowners who were given generous cash settlements for their dangerous, sinking homes last year have turned around and stiffed the city. And they did it the old fashioned way, following the adage, "take the money and run. " City officials say it was pure humanitarian concern that encouraged them to make many of the payments soon after homeowners evacuated their structurally damaged homes.
NEWS
December 17, 1992 | By John Brazington, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
The board of education has decided to take no official action in a dispute over land on which the old Franklinville Elementary School is located - at least not until someone bids on the shuttered school. A question has been raised over whether the school district has clear title to all the land. The issue of who has rights to the Franklinville School came up when resident Claude Maycock, former president of the township's Democratic organization and a one-time school board candidate, presented a four-page document to the press during the Dec. 8 municipal meeting.
NEWS
March 13, 2013 | By Ashley Hahn, For The Inquirer
On the short block of South 47th Street between Paschall and Grays Ferry Avenues, there is a row of once-lovely, now-busted brick rowhouses. Porches sag, windows are shattered, and doorways are boarded up. One building in particular, 1503 S. 47th, is in the worst shape, with an orange Clean and Seal notice from the Department of Licenses and Inspections posted in July 2011 on plywood where the front door should be. Tax delinquent? Check. Code violations? Check. Owner? Guy Thigpen.
NEWS
May 9, 2008
I WISH to correct your May 5 editorial "Calling All Elves: Fix Casino Issue. " You said I voted for Act 71. As a first-term legislator, I wasn't a member in July 2004. Notwithstanding that, when seen from a land-use perspective, stripped of the glitter of easy money, the process has resulted in a stalemate that will drag on for years. The licensees' lack of due diligence in site selection is their problem. Potential revenue should not and cannot absolve them of adhering to the same process as other developers.
NEWS
January 23, 2001 | By Martin Z. Braun, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Almost three years ago, a Pennsylvania developer acknowledged the township school board's ownership of a 10.4-acre tract that is the focus of a legal battle, court documents say. In documents previously filed by the school board, an official with Orleans Homebuilders Inc. told a board attorney that the tract in the Surrey Place East neighborhood was to have been deeded by the developer to the school district as part of a subdivision agreement, but...
NEWS
May 25, 1989 | By Wanda Motley, Inquirer Staff Writer
David J. Mermelstein, a Huntingdon Valley developer who two weeks ago bid $8.6 million to acquire the beleaguered Rebel Hill development in Upper Merion, forfeited an $860,000 cash deposit yesterday after failing to meet a deadline for the balance of payment. The U.S. Marshals Service said the forfeiture came minutes after a late- afternoon hearing during which U.S. District Court Judge Louis H. Pollak denied a motion by Mermelstein for an extension to make the payment. Mermelstein had requested the extension in a court petition Monday.
NEWS
September 19, 1990 | By Jean Redstone, Special to The Inquirer
Gloucester County College will at long last put up for sale the stately, brick home it has been trying to get rid of for 10 years. The college will host an open house Sunday and again Oct. 14 from 1 to 4 p.m. at the Benjamin Clark home on Woodbury-Glassboro Road in Deptford. Any buyer interested in the house must deliver a sealed bid no later than 2 p.m. Nov. 2 to the college vice president of administrative services on the school campus off Tanyard Road in Deptford. There is no minimum bid required, but the college reserves the right to reject any or all of the bids, which must be accompanied by a certified check for at least 10 percent of the bid. The home, built in 1750 by farmer Benjamin Clark, was deeded to the college in 1974 by the developers who bought the Clark property and built Tall Pines Village on it. That deed stipulated that the home would go to Deptford Township if the college failed to make use of it. The college has failed to make use of it since 1980, when the Gloucester County Adult Activities Center, which had been renting the house, moved out. The center could not afford to renovate the home or make it accessible to the handicapped.
NEWS
July 21, 1988 | By Diane M. Fiske, Special to The Inquirer
Who was responsible for building Michael Amoruso's house three inches within the property of John M. Langloss on Hidden Spring Circle in Newtown Square? And should Amoruso, as Langloss wishes, be compelled to tear down one wing of a very expensive house? The Hidden Spring Circle houses are part of a seven-residence subdivision completed last year. Houses in the subdivision at Malin and Bryn Mawr Roads were sold in the $300,000 range by builder Joseph Falcone and Amoruso, his partner for the venture.
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NEWS
March 13, 2013 | By Ashley Hahn, For The Inquirer
On the short block of South 47th Street between Paschall and Grays Ferry Avenues, there is a row of once-lovely, now-busted brick rowhouses. Porches sag, windows are shattered, and doorways are boarded up. One building in particular, 1503 S. 47th, is in the worst shape, with an orange Clean and Seal notice from the Department of Licenses and Inspections posted in July 2011 on plywood where the front door should be. Tax delinquent? Check. Code violations? Check. Owner? Guy Thigpen.
NEWS
August 31, 2010 | By Jacqueline L. Urgo, Inquirer Staff Writer
STAFFORD TOWNSHIP, N.J. - It's known simply as "the shack. " The rough-hewn duck-hunting cabin, located off eastbound Route 72 on the causeway to Long Beach Island, has been pondered, painted, and photographed. So decrepit locals marvel it survived the brutal winter, the beloved landmark fashioned from cedar and pine boards seven or eight decades ago is a reminder of when the Ocean County Shore destination was an enclave of humble cottages and fishing shanties. Alarm over the shack's fate hit like a wave last year when the property adjacent to it, a tidal mudflat on the Barnegat Bay islet known as Cedar Bonnet Island, changed hands.
NEWS
May 9, 2008
I WISH to correct your May 5 editorial "Calling All Elves: Fix Casino Issue. " You said I voted for Act 71. As a first-term legislator, I wasn't a member in July 2004. Notwithstanding that, when seen from a land-use perspective, stripped of the glitter of easy money, the process has resulted in a stalemate that will drag on for years. The licensees' lack of due diligence in site selection is their problem. Potential revenue should not and cannot absolve them of adhering to the same process as other developers.
NEWS
August 29, 2006 | Robert W. Radtke
Robert W. Radtke is president of Episcopal Relief and Development (www.er-d.org) in New York Hurricane Katrina scattered about half New Orleans' pre-storm population of 465,000 and destroyed about 275,000 of its homes. One year later, few have been rebuilt, leaving the New Orleans diaspora unable to return. Housing is a fundamental social need; its lack contributes to cascading social failures, from poverty and crime to failing schools and health-care systems. For example, New Orleans' hospital and clinic space is still severely curtailed - the estimated 75 percent of health-care professionals who left after Katrina can't return without somewhere to live.
NEWS
April 25, 2003 | By Trudy Rubin
Months of Iraq news has buried interesting events in other parts of the world. But one upbeat item drew my eyes away from tales of Shiite mourning. The new government of Brazil, led by a man who rose from the slums to become President "Lula" da Silva, is experimenting with a bold plan to help Brazil's poor become capitalists. Lula is promising to find a way to give some of Brazil's poorest people formal title to their homes. The concept resembles the blueprint of Peruvian author Hernando de Soto, who created a stir in 2000 with his book The Mystery of Capital: Why Capitalism Triumphs in the West and Fails Everywhere Else.
NEWS
January 23, 2001 | By Martin Z. Braun, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Almost three years ago, a Pennsylvania developer acknowledged the township school board's ownership of a 10.4-acre tract that is the focus of a legal battle, court documents say. In documents previously filed by the school board, an official with Orleans Homebuilders Inc. told a board attorney that the tract in the Surrey Place East neighborhood was to have been deeded by the developer to the school district as part of a subdivision agreement, but...
NEWS
November 3, 2000 | by Mark McDonald and Earni Young, Daily News Staff Writers
In a severe case of biting the hand that feeds you, almost one third of the Wissinoming homeowners who were given generous cash settlements for their dangerous, sinking homes last year have turned around and stiffed the city. And they did it the old fashioned way, following the adage, "take the money and run. " City officials say it was pure humanitarian concern that encouraged them to make many of the payments soon after homeowners evacuated their structurally damaged homes.
NEWS
December 2, 1998 | by Earni Young, Daily News Staff Writer
Many elderly homeowners in the North Philadelphia Central Empowerment Zone have watched houses being built in the neighborhood while their own homes were falling down. But relief is on the way. At least 100 of these senior citizens will receive $2,500 home-repair grants from Nationwide Insurance - the result of a settlement of racial-discrimination and red-lining charges against the company. The grants will be dispensed by the Local Initiatives Support Coalition, a nonprofit agency that also has been selected to administer the $4.6 million in federal housing funds allocated to the North Central Empowerment Zone.
NEWS
December 17, 1992 | By John Brazington, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
The board of education has decided to take no official action in a dispute over land on which the old Franklinville Elementary School is located - at least not until someone bids on the shuttered school. A question has been raised over whether the school district has clear title to all the land. The issue of who has rights to the Franklinville School came up when resident Claude Maycock, former president of the township's Democratic organization and a one-time school board candidate, presented a four-page document to the press during the Dec. 8 municipal meeting.
NEWS
January 9, 1991 | By Jean Redstone, Special to The Inquirer
The real estate transaction that took place in Woodbury on Friday closed the 10-year attempt by Gloucester County College to sell the historical Benjamin Clark house in Deptford. At the closing, ownership of the Revolutionary War-era home passed from the college to Thomas and Candace Beach of Mount Laurel, who paid $211,002, the highest of eight bids the college received after placing the house on the market in September. The Flemish brick home, built in 1750 by farmer Benjamin Clark, was deeded to the college in 1974 by the developers who built the Tall Pines Village on the surrounding farmland.
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