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Cleft Palate

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NEWS
September 13, 1987 | By Dwight Ott, Inquirer Staff Writer
Barbara Iovannicci's joy quickly turned to terror five years ago. "I couldn't see my baby; I didn't know what he looked like," she recalled. "All I saw was the nurses hurriedly carrying the baby from the delivery room. I could only see the big black hole in his head. That's all I could see. " On Aug. 30, 1982, Iovannicci's son, Mark, was born a victim of the most common birth defect in the country after clubfoot - cleft palate. She remembered the tears of horror that welled in her eyes as she lay on the operating table.
NEWS
July 19, 2013 | By Sandy Bauers, Inquirer Staff Writer
Robert Walton - 8 years old, with as many surgeries behind him - smiled shyly as he reached out a hand. Before him, a 12-pound bulldog pup squirmed excitedly. And then, they connected. Small hand to beige-and-white fur. Robert and Lentil. Later, the Bensalem youth, son of Rose and Robert Walton, proclaimed, "He's exactly like me. " Each was born with a cleft palate. They were gathered at the University of Pennsylvania veterinary school for a feel-good session, a mutual inspiration party held with Children's Hospital of Philadelphia.
NEWS
May 24, 1994 | by Marianne Costantinou, Daily News Staff Writer
Who would have guessed that a heart defect and a speech problem can be caused by the same genetic glitch? It's taken Beverly Emanuel of Children's Hospital of Philadelphia more than 10 years of genetic research to finally nail down the culprit. It's a missing gene on chromosome 22, and its absence causes a variety of medical problems in children, from cleft palate and speech disorders to a life-threatening heart condition. Yesterday, U.S. Sen. Arlen Specter announced at a press conference that the National Institutes of Health has granted the hospital a $5 million grant to study the missing gene and one of the diseases it causes: Velo-cardio-facial syndrome.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 7, 1986 | By Paddy Noyes, Special to The Inquirer
As Ricky, 12, sits in the chair to have his picture taken, his eyes sparkle with innocence. He folds his arms in front of him in an appropriate pose and smiles. He is happy to be here. Everyone he meets could be a new friend. Life is an adventure full of wonderful surprises, and his heart is open to accept and claim any good that comes his way. Ricky, who is in good health, was born with a harelip and cleft palate. A harelip is a split in the upper part of the lip where the lip fails to grow together.
NEWS
October 5, 2000 | By Huntly Collins, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
A prenatal diagnosis of such hereditary disorders as Down syndrome or dwarfism can present agonizing decisions for expectant parents. Among the issues: Should they have the baby or abort it? While most geneticists in the West strive to give parents objective information so they can make informed decisions, geneticists in many other countries direct parents one way or the other, according to a survey reported yesterday at a genetics conference in Philadelphia. The responses were based on hypothetical situations involving fetuses diagnosed with disabilities ranging from cleft palate to spina bifida.
NEWS
July 10, 1988 | By Gloria A. Hoffner, Special to The Inquirer
Neftali DeJesus Rodriquez DeLeon, 4, of Guatemala is a fan of Sesame Street, Mickey Mouse and the medical staff at the Mercy Catholic Medical Center's Fitzgerald Mercy Division in Darby. Neftali, who was born with a cleft palate, arrived in Delaware County on June 15 to receive free medical treatment at the hospital through Heal the Children, an international nonprofit organization that arranges medical services for children in Third World countries. His surgery was successful, according to the doctors, and he can go home when arrangements are made later this month.
NEWS
November 8, 2010 | By Daniel Rubin, Inquirer Columnist
When it was time to pose for her oil portrait, Gracie Ehrline arrived at Studio Incamminati in flip-flops and a T-shirt that read: "Small But Mighty. " Robin Dawn Frey, the artist commissioned to paint the 12-year-old girl, remembers that first day, two years ago. "She bounded through the door, jumped up onto the platform, whipped out her cell phone, and said to the person on the other end, 'Dude, I'm getting my portrait painted.' " Children's Hospital of Philadelphia had given no specific instructions to the Center City studio and school, which specializes in realism.
NEWS
August 12, 1988 | By Ellen O'Brien, Inquirer Staff Writer
Chang Liu is 2 years old and is far from her native China. The trip across the world was worth it, though. It was time for her to undergo reconstructive surgery, and it was time for her to be reunited with her parents. "Really, I feel very grateful," said Chang's father, Feng Liu, 25, who, with his wife, Xin Chu, is in the aerospace doctoral program at Princeton University in New Jersey. On Tuesday, Chang underwent surgery to repair a cleft palate at Cooper Hospital-University Medical Center in Camden.
NEWS
December 22, 1995 | By Monique El-Faizy, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
The creche from Germany is made of glazed white porcelain. In one from Peru, the Holy Family is garbed in brightly colored, handwoven cloth. A third Nativity scene, from Haiti, is fashioned from an oil drum. Whether delicately wrought or roughly hewn, each of the more than 200 creches and Madonnas on display at St. Paul's Episcopal Church on Old York Road was inspired by the story of Jesus' birth and devotion to Him and his mother, Mary. The creches belong to the church's rector, the Rev. Milton Cole.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 8, 1998 | By Clifford A. Ridley, INQUIRER THEATER CRITIC
When pretty Constance Chandebise suspects her husband, Victor, the insurance executive, of cheating on her, she enlists the help of an old friend, Lucie Homenides de Histingua, and they devise a plan. Lucie will send Victor a letter from an alleged secret admirer, proposing a rendezvous at the notorious Hotel Pussycat, and Constance will appear at the appointed hour. Should Victor take the bait, he'll be toast. You know where we are, of course. Not merely at the Pussycat, although formula indeed dictates that the second act will transpire in that discreet establishment, but in Feydeau Country - the land of liaisons that never liaise, of rectitude that wins in the end, not because it's right and proper, but because the alternative is just so exhausting.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
July 19, 2013 | By Sandy Bauers, Inquirer Staff Writer
Robert Walton - 8 years old, with as many surgeries behind him - smiled shyly as he reached out a hand. Before him, a 12-pound bulldog pup squirmed excitedly. And then, they connected. Small hand to beige-and-white fur. Robert and Lentil. Later, the Bensalem youth, son of Rose and Robert Walton, proclaimed, "He's exactly like me. " Each was born with a cleft palate. They were gathered at the University of Pennsylvania veterinary school for a feel-good session, a mutual inspiration party held with Children's Hospital of Philadelphia.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 10, 2013 | BY STEPHANIE FARR, Daily News Staff Writer farrs@phillynews.com, 215-854-4225
HE SOUNDS like an Ewok when he gets excited, he's named after a legume, he eats from a tube and he's taking over the Internet. Lentil, a 9-week-old French bulldog rescue puppy with a severe cleft palate and lip, is making humans from Taiwan to Germany drool, but it's Philadelphia that he calls home. His Facebook fan page, called "My name is Lentil," has more than 48,000 likes, and people the world over look forward to the daily video and photo posts from Lentil's "foster mom," Lindsay Condefer, of Fishtown.
NEWS
November 8, 2010 | By Daniel Rubin, Inquirer Columnist
When it was time to pose for her oil portrait, Gracie Ehrline arrived at Studio Incamminati in flip-flops and a T-shirt that read: "Small But Mighty. " Robin Dawn Frey, the artist commissioned to paint the 12-year-old girl, remembers that first day, two years ago. "She bounded through the door, jumped up onto the platform, whipped out her cell phone, and said to the person on the other end, 'Dude, I'm getting my portrait painted.' " Children's Hospital of Philadelphia had given no specific instructions to the Center City studio and school, which specializes in realism.
NEWS
December 5, 2003 | By Susan Snyder INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Jerri Diane Sueck was orphaned at age 8 after her mother died in a trailer fire. Most relatives shunned her, and the only ones who agreed to take her confined her to a coal cellar with her three brothers. There, she was fed little and called "a bastard. " After two years, she was dumped at an orphanage and later shuffled to foster homes. Sueck attained college degrees and became a teacher in the Philadelphia School District. "What was really constant in my life was education.
NEWS
October 5, 2000 | By Huntly Collins, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
A prenatal diagnosis of such hereditary disorders as Down syndrome or dwarfism can present agonizing decisions for expectant parents. Among the issues: Should they have the baby or abort it? While most geneticists in the West strive to give parents objective information so they can make informed decisions, geneticists in many other countries direct parents one way or the other, according to a survey reported yesterday at a genetics conference in Philadelphia. The responses were based on hypothetical situations involving fetuses diagnosed with disabilities ranging from cleft palate to spina bifida.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 8, 1998 | By Clifford A. Ridley, INQUIRER THEATER CRITIC
When pretty Constance Chandebise suspects her husband, Victor, the insurance executive, of cheating on her, she enlists the help of an old friend, Lucie Homenides de Histingua, and they devise a plan. Lucie will send Victor a letter from an alleged secret admirer, proposing a rendezvous at the notorious Hotel Pussycat, and Constance will appear at the appointed hour. Should Victor take the bait, he'll be toast. You know where we are, of course. Not merely at the Pussycat, although formula indeed dictates that the second act will transpire in that discreet establishment, but in Feydeau Country - the land of liaisons that never liaise, of rectitude that wins in the end, not because it's right and proper, but because the alternative is just so exhausting.
NEWS
June 29, 1997 | By David E. Wilson, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
The scene was like something out of M A S H: A team of U.S. doctors was holed up in Bacolod City in the Philippines. They were set to operate on more than 200 Filipinos, most with cleft palates, within the next few days at a local regional hospital. But in the Philippines, where standard voltage is 220 instead of 120, the doctors found themselves without the proper electrical connections to run their surgical equipment. The supplies were en route, somewhere over the Pacific Ocean.
NEWS
December 22, 1995 | By Monique El-Faizy, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
The creche from Germany is made of glazed white porcelain. In one from Peru, the Holy Family is garbed in brightly colored, handwoven cloth. A third Nativity scene, from Haiti, is fashioned from an oil drum. Whether delicately wrought or roughly hewn, each of the more than 200 creches and Madonnas on display at St. Paul's Episcopal Church on Old York Road was inspired by the story of Jesus' birth and devotion to Him and his mother, Mary. The creches belong to the church's rector, the Rev. Milton Cole.
SPORTS
June 22, 1994 | By Frank Fitzpatrick, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The last month has been painful for Larry Andersen. There was the physical pain of his back and rib-cage injury, but also the mental anguish of not pitching the way he thought he could. So, unable to breathe without pain, placed on the disabled list for the third time in two months, the 41-year-old reliever called his wife late Monday night and told her he was thinking about retirement, "I called Trish last night and we talked it over, the possibility of it," Andersen said yesterday afternoon.
NEWS
May 24, 1994 | by Marianne Costantinou, Daily News Staff Writer
Who would have guessed that a heart defect and a speech problem can be caused by the same genetic glitch? It's taken Beverly Emanuel of Children's Hospital of Philadelphia more than 10 years of genetic research to finally nail down the culprit. It's a missing gene on chromosome 22, and its absence causes a variety of medical problems in children, from cleft palate and speech disorders to a life-threatening heart condition. Yesterday, U.S. Sen. Arlen Specter announced at a press conference that the National Institutes of Health has granted the hospital a $5 million grant to study the missing gene and one of the diseases it causes: Velo-cardio-facial syndrome.
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