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Clematis

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NEWS
February 25, 1990 | By Jane Pepper, Special to The Inquirer
Pruning instructions for clematis are often so complicated that potential purchasers hesitate to buy these wonderful vines in the first place. "All you have to remember," says Chris Woods, superintendent at Chanticleer, a private estate in Wayne, "is that there are three types of clematis and that each type should be pruned differently. " First on his list: hybrids and cultivars of Clematis viticella and Cx Jackmanii because they produce large, beautiful flowers - and also because they are the easiest to care for. They produce flowers at some time between early July and October.
NEWS
October 15, 1989 | By Jane G. Pepper, Special to The Inquirer
One of the joys of knowing gardeners is that they're always willing to share. Sometimes it's a cutting or a basket of vegetables; often it's a precious tip. Horticulturist Ernesta Ballard gave me such a tip when I was visiting the garden that she and her husband, Fred, tend in Philadelphia. One of the walls of their house was covered with the white blooms of Clematis paniculata. In his Manual of Woody Landscape Plants, Michael Dirr refers disparagingly to this sweetautumn clematis as a "rampant, rampaging vine, which engulfs every structure in sight.
LIVING
June 20, 2008 | By Virginia A. Smith INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Americans love big stuff, and that includes flowers: tulips as dense as dahlias, dahlias bulked up like peonies, and peonies as grand as roses. So it's not surprising that the group of tiny clematis known as viorna has never made the best-seller list. In fact, few gardeners know about it, and it's almost impossible to find. Garden centers, big-box stores, even growers and writers are too busy cashing in on the splashy, flat-faced stars of the clematis world. Those would be hybrids such as champagne-pink 'Nelly Moser,' a dramatic heirloom with 8-inch blooms and a thick cherry stripe down the center.
NEWS
May 21, 2010
Pruning is one of the scariest tasks in any garden. Most of us fly blind and do terrible things to our plants, shrubs, and trees. But as Lee Reich explains in The Pruning Book (Taunton Press, $21.95), proper pruning is critical. It keeps plants healthy, prevents them from growing too large, enhances their beauty, and improves the quality and quantity of their flowers, leaves and fruits. Not only that, but pruning can be fun, he says. Really? The oblivious among us know that nothing feels better than to whack away at an overgrown anything, but that's not the kind of fun Reich is talking about.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 14, 2014 | By Patricia Schrieber, Inquirer Columnist
Harvest leafy vegetables, and plant more crops. The recent spurts of higher temperatures have pushed cool-season crops like spinach and lettuce to slow down and start to develop flower stems, or bolt. Once that happens, leaves turn bitter, so start picking now. After harvesting everything, although you'll have empty spots in the garden, you can soon fill them with new crops, planting either seeds or transplants. If planted now, quite a number of vegetables can provide a bountiful harvest through the fall, including beans, beets, carrots, chard, cucumbers, melons, pumpkins, summer and winter squash.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 19, 2016
Early Spring Blooms Tour Visit & learn about the Scott Arboretum's plant collections. Swarthmore College, Scott Arboretum, 500 College Ave., Swarthmore; 610-328-8025. 3/19. 2-3:30 pm. Hellebore Festival & Spring Fair Hellebore display & sale, plus a craft show w/food & Easter treats (Sat. only). Linden Hill Gardens, 8230 Easton Rd., Ottsville. 3/19. Twist, Twine & Twirl: A Look at Vining Plants Vine-growing presentation w/information on regionally suitable clematis varieties. Swarthmore College, Scott Arboretum, 500 College Ave., Swarthmore; Registration required.
NEWS
May 2, 1993 | By Jane Pepper, FOR THE INQUIRER
When the Scott Arboretum at Swarthmore College was founded more than 60 years ago, family and friends of Arthur Hoyt Scott carried forward a dream he had had for many years. An enthusiastic gardener, Scott wanted area residents to have the opportunity to see the best garden plants growing locally. Scott especially fancied lilacs, and the arboretum has wonderful collections of that plant. It also has cherries, crab apples, magnolias, peonies and daffodils, just to mention a few. The collections are probably broader than even the visionary Scott could have imagined.
NEWS
June 12, 1988 | By Jane G. Pepper, Special to The Inquirer
Our climbing hydrangea has finally taken off. It has taken a few years, but this spring it is luxuriant with growth and makes a nice pattern on the stone wall. Walls and fences can be beautiful by themselves, but frequently they look even better if partly covered with vines. Vines also can be useful in camouflaging an ugly service entrance, the neighbor's dog pen or some other unsightly area. If you're making a new garden this spring and need fast cover, consider planting an annual vine that could still give you lush growth this summer and fall.
NEWS
February 13, 1994 | By Jane G. Pepper, FOR THE INQUIRER
Like most garden writers, I receive lots of mail about new items and information. Here's a selection from which I thought you would benefit. Given my fondness for my gardening partner, I figured you should know about a software program called "Gardner Pardner. " My partner digs and harvests. The Pardner helps you keep track of all kinds of things, such as genus, species, transplant date, pinch date, light conditions, hardiness zone, where purchased and description notes. Gardner Pardner is written for any IBM- compatible PC running on Microsoft Windows software.
NEWS
May 22, 1994 | By Jane G. Pepper, FOR THE INQUIRER
When Eric and Ellen Petersen moved from New York to West Chester, they bought a 60-year-old house. The garden takes up about a third of an acre, and as they analyzed it during their first season, they struggled to incorporate the new with the old. A magnificent weeping cherry, a couple of grandiflora magnolias and old American hollies had survived since the 1950s, throwing lots of shade. Gardeners often bemoan shade, but for Ellen Petersen, whose garden will be on display to the public in June, it's a good environment because she loves foliage, and she's always experimenting with foliage combinations.
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ENTERTAINMENT
March 19, 2016
Early Spring Blooms Tour Visit & learn about the Scott Arboretum's plant collections. Swarthmore College, Scott Arboretum, 500 College Ave., Swarthmore; 610-328-8025. 3/19. 2-3:30 pm. Hellebore Festival & Spring Fair Hellebore display & sale, plus a craft show w/food & Easter treats (Sat. only). Linden Hill Gardens, 8230 Easton Rd., Ottsville. 3/19. Twist, Twine & Twirl: A Look at Vining Plants Vine-growing presentation w/information on regionally suitable clematis varieties. Swarthmore College, Scott Arboretum, 500 College Ave., Swarthmore; Registration required.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 14, 2014 | By Patricia Schrieber, Inquirer Columnist
Harvest leafy vegetables, and plant more crops. The recent spurts of higher temperatures have pushed cool-season crops like spinach and lettuce to slow down and start to develop flower stems, or bolt. Once that happens, leaves turn bitter, so start picking now. After harvesting everything, although you'll have empty spots in the garden, you can soon fill them with new crops, planting either seeds or transplants. If planted now, quite a number of vegetables can provide a bountiful harvest through the fall, including beans, beets, carrots, chard, cucumbers, melons, pumpkins, summer and winter squash.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 8, 2014 | By Virginia A. Smith, Inquirer Staff Writer
If you've ever seen silvery-green mountain mint at the height of summer, you'll understand why Pat Sutton practically swoons over it. "Tops on my list," she says of this native perennial, which is loved by nectar-seeking butterflies, bees, wasps, and moths, but little known to gardeners. Sutton, an exuberant wildlife gardener and native-plant champion from Cape May County, is the exception. And, as you can imagine, her list of unusual favorites is long. Something to think about as you spend these snowy days thumbing through the 2014 catalogs touting all the "hot new plants.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 20, 2013 | By Virginia A. Smith, Inquirer Staff Writer
'Kale in the serpentine" sounds like the title of a whodunit, but there's no mystery here - just something new and fun that awaits visitors to Chanticleer, the public garden in Wayne that likes to change things up every year. Other Philadelphia-area gardens have added stuff this spring, too, from new tree houses and replenished rose gardens to "steps-free" walkways and giant bug sculptures. But "kale in the serpentine" definitely stands out. First, the serpentine. It's a hillside garden planted every spring with snaking swaths of cool and colorful crops like wheat, tobacco, barley, cotton, flax, sunflowers, or sorghum.
NEWS
May 21, 2010
Pruning is one of the scariest tasks in any garden. Most of us fly blind and do terrible things to our plants, shrubs, and trees. But as Lee Reich explains in The Pruning Book (Taunton Press, $21.95), proper pruning is critical. It keeps plants healthy, prevents them from growing too large, enhances their beauty, and improves the quality and quantity of their flowers, leaves and fruits. Not only that, but pruning can be fun, he says. Really? The oblivious among us know that nothing feels better than to whack away at an overgrown anything, but that's not the kind of fun Reich is talking about.
LIVING
June 20, 2008 | By Virginia A. Smith INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Americans love big stuff, and that includes flowers: tulips as dense as dahlias, dahlias bulked up like peonies, and peonies as grand as roses. So it's not surprising that the group of tiny clematis known as viorna has never made the best-seller list. In fact, few gardeners know about it, and it's almost impossible to find. Garden centers, big-box stores, even growers and writers are too busy cashing in on the splashy, flat-faced stars of the clematis world. Those would be hybrids such as champagne-pink 'Nelly Moser,' a dramatic heirloom with 8-inch blooms and a thick cherry stripe down the center.
LIVING
April 6, 2007 | By Virginia A. Smith INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
As an artist and gardener, Victoria Mowrer has a thing for funky vines, especially gourds that rocket round the clock in the heat of summer. "They're very fun because they grow so fast, and I really am enchanted with their tendrils. They're magical," says Mowrer, of Strasburg, who sculpts the ugly-duckling fruits into charming birdhouses, mobiles and masks. (She regularly teaches gourd workshops at Jenkins Arboretum in Devon). But creepers sometimes have an image problem. Mention "vine" to a gardener and count the seconds till phrases like "man-eating English ivy" come sputtering out of their mouths.
NEWS
May 22, 1994 | By Jane G. Pepper, FOR THE INQUIRER
When Eric and Ellen Petersen moved from New York to West Chester, they bought a 60-year-old house. The garden takes up about a third of an acre, and as they analyzed it during their first season, they struggled to incorporate the new with the old. A magnificent weeping cherry, a couple of grandiflora magnolias and old American hollies had survived since the 1950s, throwing lots of shade. Gardeners often bemoan shade, but for Ellen Petersen, whose garden will be on display to the public in June, it's a good environment because she loves foliage, and she's always experimenting with foliage combinations.
NEWS
February 13, 1994 | By Jane G. Pepper, FOR THE INQUIRER
Like most garden writers, I receive lots of mail about new items and information. Here's a selection from which I thought you would benefit. Given my fondness for my gardening partner, I figured you should know about a software program called "Gardner Pardner. " My partner digs and harvests. The Pardner helps you keep track of all kinds of things, such as genus, species, transplant date, pinch date, light conditions, hardiness zone, where purchased and description notes. Gardner Pardner is written for any IBM- compatible PC running on Microsoft Windows software.
NEWS
May 2, 1993 | By Jane Pepper, FOR THE INQUIRER
When the Scott Arboretum at Swarthmore College was founded more than 60 years ago, family and friends of Arthur Hoyt Scott carried forward a dream he had had for many years. An enthusiastic gardener, Scott wanted area residents to have the opportunity to see the best garden plants growing locally. Scott especially fancied lilacs, and the arboretum has wonderful collections of that plant. It also has cherries, crab apples, magnolias, peonies and daffodils, just to mention a few. The collections are probably broader than even the visionary Scott could have imagined.
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