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NEWS
March 4, 2016 | By Caitlin McCabe, Staff Writer
JOHNSTOWN, Pa. - One day after a grand jury report accused the Altoona-Johnstown Roman Catholic Diocese of hiding or ignoring decades of clergy sex abuse, a judge sentenced one of those priests Wednesday to more than 16 years in prison for sexually assaulting two boys during missionary trips to Honduras. U.S. District Judge Kim R. Gibson also ordered the Rev. Joseph Maurizio, 70, to pay a $50,000 fine and $10,000 in restitution to each child. Gibson did not mention the separate investigation or report by state prosecutors, but criticized Maurizio for preying upon vulnerable children and hiding behind his collar.
NEWS
March 3, 2016 | By Mensah M. Dean, Staff Writer
In the second meeting in as many days on Philadelphia's ever-present problem of gun violence, a group of clerical and civic leaders concluded that stopping young men from arming themselves and shooting themselves and others has no easy solutions. "We are in a war, a real war, where casualties are every day in our community," Kenny Gamble, the Grammy-winning record producer and developer, who has focused his attention on the South Philadelphia neighborhood of his birth, said Tuesday during a faith-based roundtable discussion at City Hall.
NEWS
January 29, 2016 | By Brian X. McCrone, Staff Writer
Hillary Clinton took a break from Iowa on Wednesday evening to attend a fund-raiser at the Navy Yard in South Philadelphia. The Democratic presidential hopeful arrived shortly after 7:30 p.m. at the headquarters of the financial firm Franklin Square Capital Partners. Roughly 200 people streamed into the recently built office. Entire families were among the crowd, which included Philadelphia Councilman Kenyatta Johnson and his wife, political consultant Dawn Chavous, and the city's acting fire commissioner, Derrick Sawyer.
NEWS
December 24, 2015 | By Jeremy Roebuck, Staff Writer
A Pennsylvania appellate court on Tuesday ordered a new trial for Msgr. William J. Lynn, overturning for a second time a landmark verdict that was the first conviction nationwide of a Catholic Church official for covering up child sex abuse by priests. A three-judge Superior Court panel found that Lynn's 2012 conviction had been tainted by prosecutors' presentation of nearly two dozen examples of the Philadelphia Archdiocese's failure to handle pedophilia within its ranks. Lynn, however, was only charged in connection with his supervision of two priests.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 14, 2015 | By Steven Rea, Inquirer Movie Critic
Church spires jut from the Boston neighborhoods in Spotlight , one of the great movies about journalism, and one of the great movies of our time, period. The stained glass and weathered stone of these sanctuaries - many of them part of the Roman Catholic Archdiocese of Boston - often front onto parks and playgrounds full of children. Inside some of those same churches, for decades, priests preyed on children, molesting them, abusing them, and getting away with it, despite the complaints of family members, despite the knowledge of the archdiocese, the cardinals, the bishops.
NEWS
November 9, 2015 | By Steven Rea, Inquirer Columnist
'My persona has been hijacked," Boston Globe editor Walter "Robby" Robinson declared last year, writing about what it felt like to witness a certain Hollywood star assume his identity, his mannerisms, his walk, his talk. "If Michael Keaton robbed a bank, the police would quickly have me in handcuffs," he added. Keaton, on the phone last week and reminded of Robinson's remarks, laughed. "Robby was so easy to play, in a way," said the actor, part of an ace ensemble - Rachel McAdams, Mark Ruffalo, John Slattery, Brian d'Arcy James, Liev Schreiber - who wear the ID cards of real-life Globe reporters and editors in Tom McCarthy's thrilling journalism drama, Spotlight . Robinson, whom Keaton plays with the perfect calibration of accent and comportment, was the editor of the paper's Spotlight unit, a small troop of reporters allowed to dig deep and go long on big stories.
NEWS
September 25, 2015 | By David O'Reilly, Inquirer Staff Writer
WASHINGTON - Pope Francis on Wednesday surprised and irked victims of Roman Catholic clergy sex abuse when he praised a gathering of U.S. bishops for their "courage" in handling the crisis, and consoled them for how stressful it had been. He also insisted that sex abuse at the hands of clergy must never happen again. His remarks brought a stinging rebuke from some abuse victims, who said courage should be reserved for themselves. "The bishops are poster boys for the fainthearted and timid.
NEWS
August 7, 2015 | BY DANA DiFILIPPO, Daily News Staff Writer difilid@phillynews.com, 215-854-5934
THE ACTIVISTS demanding a new investigation into the controversial police shooting death of Brandon Tate-Brown got a surprising ally yesterday: a police-advocacy group. The Guardian Civic League, which advocates for black officers, joined several other groups - including Philly's NAACP chapter, the Philadelphia Black Clergy, Philadelphians Organized to Witness, Empower & Rebuild and the National Action Network - on the Mayfair street where Tate-Brown, 26, died Dec. 15. The community leaders called on District Attorney Seth Williams to reopen his probe and on Police Commissioner Charles Ramsey to fire and arrest officer Nicholas Carrelli, who shot Tate-Brown during a routine car stop, and Heng Dang, Carrelli's partner.
BUSINESS
July 18, 2015 | By Harold Brubaker, Inquirer Staff Writer
A two-month investigation of the Cordish Cos. by the Black Clergy of Philadelphia and Vicinity found "no credible evidence" that the firm chosen to build a casino in South Philadelphia "practices racism or has a culture or history of discrimination. " The 16-page report released Thursday contained new background on a controversy that erupted last month when a news conference on alleged racist practices by Baltimore-based Cordish unraveled. The Rev. Terrence Griffith, president of the Black Clergy, said he learned of the alleged discrimination against guests at Cordish facilities in the Midwest at a March meeting with Jason Ortiz of Metropolitan Public Strategies, a consulting firm working for a labor union that has had a rocky relationship with Cordish but does not represent Cordish employees.
NEWS
June 7, 2015 | By Julia Terruso, Inquirer Staff Writer
A Protestant bishop from Philadelphia will join clergy from around the country next week in a visit to the Vatican to meet with advisers to Pope Francis to discuss how the pope's message of inclusion applies to race relations in the United States. Bishop Dwayne Royster, head of Philadelphians Organized to Witness, Empower, and Rebuild (POWER), said the group wants to convey to the Vatican how low wages, criminalization, immigration, detention, and police brutality have hurt families in the U.S. "One of the things we're trying to say to the pope very clearly, and convey to his advisers, is, in the U.S., when you talk about any justice issue, race is at the center of it," Royster said.
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