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NEWS
June 26, 2012 | By Dara McBride, Inquirer Staff Writer
"Abominable," "shameful" and "sad" were a few of the words the parishioners of St. Joseph Church in Downingtown used Sunday to describe the conviction of their former pastor, Msgr. William J. Lynn, of child endangerment in the landmark clergy sex-abuse trial in Philadelphia. On Friday, Lynn, 61, became the nation's first Catholic church supervisor convicted for covering up abuse by a priest. He faces up to seven years in prison. On the first Sunday after that dramatic outcome, cars packed St. Joseph's two parking lots as usual.
NEWS
June 23, 2012 | By John P. Martin, Inquirer Staff Writer
Lawyers call a judge's speech to a deadlocked jury a "dynamite charge," the workingman's nickname for a bid to blast through an impasse. On Wednesday, the 12th day of jury deliberations in the 13th week of the child-endangerment and sex-abuse trial of two Archdiocese of Philadelphia priests, the dynamite sticks came out. It just wasn't clear who might get hurt. Common Pleas Court Judge M. Teresa Sarmina's directive could dislodge a verdict in the landmark trial of a Catholic Church supervisor.
NEWS
June 23, 2012 | By Joseph A. Slobodzianand Sam Wood, INQUIRER STAFF WRITERS
UPDATED 5:45 P.M. As the jury foreman read the verdict, Monsignor William J. Lynn turned very red, his family in the two rows behind him crying. Father James Brennan dropped his head to the table as if overcome with emotion, faced with a likely retrial. Lynn was found guilty of one count of child endangerment in the landmark clergy sex-abuse case. The foreman said the jury was hung after 13 days of deliberations on Brennan's charges. Lead prosecutor Patrick Blessington angrily declared he would seek the maximum seven year prison term for the monsignor, and, describing him as a flight risk, immediately moved to revoke the Lynn's bail.
NEWS
June 21, 2012 | By John P. Martin and and Joseph A. Slobodzian and INQUIRER STAFF WRITERS
After 12 days of deliberations, the jury considering charges against two Philadelphia priests in the landmark church sex-abuse trial reported it was deadlocked Wednesday on four of five charges, but resumed working toward a verdict upon the judge's order. The Common Pleas Court jury of seven men and five women gathers again Friday to continue deliberations after a day off so one juror can tend to what Judge M. Teresa Sarmina called an "important family matter. " The jurors came into court shortly before noon with the message the lawyers and trial participants dreaded, but seemed to anticipate: We're deadlocked on all but one count.
NEWS
June 20, 2012 | By John P. Martin and Joseph A. Slobodzian and INQUIRER STAFF WRITERS
Day 11 of jury deliberations has begun in the clergy sex-abuse trial at the Criminal Justice Center in Philadelphia. Day 10 was uneventful, as the panel of seven men and five women met behind closed doors, never asking Common Pleas Court Judge M. Teresa Sarmina any questions, never rehearing any testimony, never prompting arguments between judge and attorneys. The jury convened Monday for nearly six hours -- bringing the total so far to about 36 hours -- offering no clues to their progress in the landmark case against two Archdiocese of Philadelphia priests.
NEWS
June 20, 2012 | By John P. Martin and and Joseph A. Slobodzian and INQUIRER STAFF WRITERS
An odd thing happened Monday during the 10th day of jury deliberations in the clergy sex abuse trial. Nothing. No questions from the jury, no readings of testimony, no high-decibel arguments between the lawyers and judge. Instead, for the first time in more than a week, the seven men and five women jurors appeared to work steadily — and silently — toward a verdict in the landmark case against two Archdiocese of Philadelphia priests. They met for nearly six hours of closed-door talks but offered no clues to their progress.
NEWS
June 16, 2012 | By Joseph A. Slobodzian and and John P. Martin and INQUIRER STAFF WRITERS
The jury in the sex-abuse trial of two Philadelphia Catholic priests ended a ninth day of deliberations Friday without a verdict — but also without any word that it was deadlocked. The Philadelphia Common Pleas Court panel of seven men and five women returned to court late in the afternoon to be read the part of the trial testimony of Msgr. William J. Lynn, the first Catholic Church official criminally charged for his supervisory role over deviate priests. The testimony — a portion of the three-day grilling of Lynn, 61, by Assistant District Attorney Patrick Blessington — appeared to go to the heart of the question that has been bedeviling the jurors for several days: Did the cleric knowingly put minors in danger of being sexually abused by allowing pedophile priests to be assigned to parishes where they would have access to children?
NEWS
June 15, 2012 | By John P. Martin and and Joseph A. Slobodzian and INQUIRER STAFF WRITERS
Keep the jurors late. Order them to do their job. Give them what they want. Those were options defense lawyers and prosecutors asked Common Pleas Court Judge M. Teresa Sarmina to consider Wednesday as jurors took a day off from deliberations in the landmark clergy-sex abuse trial. The panel of seven men and five women asked for the break because of graduations and family commitments. On Thursday, they are due to begin an eighth day deliberating child-endangerment and other charges against Msgr.
NEWS
June 15, 2012 | By John P. Martin and and Joseph A. Slobodzian and INQUIRER STAFF WRITERS
Jurors in the clergy sex-abuse trial of two Archdiocese of Philadelphia priests ended their eighth day of deliberations Thursday with a new set of questions that suggested they may be shifting their focus from one defendant to the other. Convening for the first time since Tuesday, the panel of seven men and five women asked to see evidence related to the landmark child-endangerment and conspiracy case against Msgr. William J. Lynn, the archdiocese's former secretary for clergy.
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