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NEWS
June 20, 2012 | By John P. Martin and and Joseph A. Slobodzian and INQUIRER STAFF WRITERS
An odd thing happened Monday during the 10th day of jury deliberations in the clergy sex abuse trial. Nothing. No questions from the jury, no readings of testimony, no high-decibel arguments between the lawyers and judge. Instead, for the first time in more than a week, the seven men and five women jurors appeared to work steadily — and silently — toward a verdict in the landmark case against two Archdiocese of Philadelphia priests. They met for nearly six hours of closed-door talks but offered no clues to their progress.
NEWS
June 16, 2012 | By Joseph A. Slobodzian and and John P. Martin and INQUIRER STAFF WRITERS
The jury in the sex-abuse trial of two Philadelphia Catholic priests ended a ninth day of deliberations Friday without a verdict — but also without any word that it was deadlocked. The Philadelphia Common Pleas Court panel of seven men and five women returned to court late in the afternoon to be read the part of the trial testimony of Msgr. William J. Lynn, the first Catholic Church official criminally charged for his supervisory role over deviate priests. The testimony — a portion of the three-day grilling of Lynn, 61, by Assistant District Attorney Patrick Blessington — appeared to go to the heart of the question that has been bedeviling the jurors for several days: Did the cleric knowingly put minors in danger of being sexually abused by allowing pedophile priests to be assigned to parishes where they would have access to children?
NEWS
June 15, 2012 | By John P. Martin and and Joseph A. Slobodzian and INQUIRER STAFF WRITERS
Keep the jurors late. Order them to do their job. Give them what they want. Those were options defense lawyers and prosecutors asked Common Pleas Court Judge M. Teresa Sarmina to consider Wednesday as jurors took a day off from deliberations in the landmark clergy-sex abuse trial. The panel of seven men and five women asked for the break because of graduations and family commitments. On Thursday, they are due to begin an eighth day deliberating child-endangerment and other charges against Msgr.
NEWS
June 15, 2012 | By John P. Martin and and Joseph A. Slobodzian and INQUIRER STAFF WRITERS
Jurors in the clergy sex-abuse trial of two Archdiocese of Philadelphia priests ended their eighth day of deliberations Thursday with a new set of questions that suggested they may be shifting their focus from one defendant to the other. Convening for the first time since Tuesday, the panel of seven men and five women asked to see evidence related to the landmark child-endangerment and conspiracy case against Msgr. William J. Lynn, the archdiocese's former secretary for clergy.
NEWS
June 12, 2012 | By John Martin, Inquirer Staff Writer
Jurors in the landmark sex-abuse trial of two Archdiocese of Philadelphia priests resumed deliberations this afternoon after a three-day break. The panel last met on Thursday, when Common Pleas Court Judge M. Teresa Sarmina agreed to jury's request to be excused all of Friday and Monday morning because of graduations and other family commitments. They also have requested to be off Wednesday if they had not reached verdicts against Msgr. William J. Lynn and the Rev. James J. Brennan.
NEWS
June 11, 2012 | Inquirer Editorial
Clergy should express contrition As penance for his involvement in the murder of Thomas Beckett, Henry II, king of England, walked to Canterbury Cathedral in sackcloth and ashes and allowed himself to be publicly flogged by the monks. Why, then, could not Cardinal Anthony Bevilacqua of the Archdiocese of Philadelphia simply have made a public admission of errant priests, rather than lead an apparent cover-up of his reassigning them without any punishment, thereby exposing other innocent children to clergy abuse?
NEWS
June 10, 2012
In a speech before 200 clergy, former mayor W. Wilson Goode encouraged the faith community to cast stigma aside and speak up on behalf of people living with HIV/AIDS. Goode, who is now an ordained minister, made the remarks Saturday at a conference for clergy hosted by Philadelphia FIGHT, an AIDS service organization. The group's Second Annual Conference for Faith Leaders to Focus on HIV featured workshops on women and youth issues, fear in the church, and how to start an HIV/Aids ministry.
NEWS
June 10, 2012 | By Kristin E. Holmes and INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
It was in a single gesture of holding hands that evangelist Darlene King first felt the stigma of her HIV diagnosis. The Germantown minister's eyes were closed and her fingers were entwined with those of other church women as they stood in a circle and prayed during a women's breakfast. King admitted her HIV status as she cried. When the minister opened her eyes, she said, the women who were standing beside her had stepped away. So King was heartened on Saturday as she sat in a room full of clergy who had come together to learn about how the faith community can cast aside stigma and enlist congregations in the fight against HIV/AIDS.
NEWS
June 8, 2012 | By John P. Martin and INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Jurors in the landmark sex-abuse trial of two Archdiocese of Philadelphia priests ended a week of deliberations Thursday with fresh signs they may be far from a verdict. Midway through a fifth day of deliberations, the jurors asked Common Pleas Court Judge M. Teresa Sarmina if they could be excused for all of Friday and Monday morning, citing graduations and family commitments. They also requested to be off Wednesday if they had not reached verdicts against Msgr. William J. Lynn and the Rev. James J. Brennan.
NEWS
June 6, 2012 | By John P. Martin and and Joseph A. Slobodzian and INQUIRER STAFF WRITERS
On their first full day of deliberations Monday, jurors in the landmark sex-abuse trial of two Archdiocese of Philadelphia priests weren't shy about asking questions. They asked for the definitions of attempted rape, and then rape itself. (They got them.) They wanted to know if they had to wait until reaching verdicts on both defendants before notifying the court staff. (They did.) And, in a question that stirred a spirited courtroom debate, they asked Common Pleas Court Judge M. Teresa Sarmina to clarify what they needed to conclude that there had been a conspiracy within the Archdiocese of Philadelphia to endanger children.
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