CollectionsCleveland Orchestra
IN THE NEWS

Cleveland Orchestra

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
February 26, 1990 | By Lesley Valdes, Inquirer Music Critic
A number of Philadelphia Orchestra members enjoyed a busman's holiday yesterday at the Academy of Music during the All Star-Forum presentation of the Cleveland Orchestra under its principal guest conductor, Vladimir Ashkenazy. No doubt the Philadelphia Orchestra's closest friendly rivals for eminence, the Clevelanders share an aesthetic of excellence and refinement that make it one of the most polished and pleasurable ensembles anywhere. On a certain level, the Cleveland Orchestra is more sedate than Philadelphia's, its good breeding occasionally taking an edge off its ability to stimulate and excite.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 8, 1993 | By Daniel Webster, INQUIRER MUSIC CRITIC
The Cleveland Orchestra is an all-too-infrequent visitor here, but the fault is Philadelphia's since there is no theater space to accommodate visiting ensembles of any size. The orchestra played Wednesday, offering a showy program of Rachmaninov and Mahler under its principal guest conductor, Vladimir Ashkenazy. The orchestra showed polished violins, well-balanced winds and a kind of playing that speaks of comfortable communication around the stage. When problems arose - and they did in the Mahler Symphony No. 1 - they appeared to be the result of the hazards that the Academy of Music's stage would present to an orchestra used to the intimacy and sonic clarity of Severance Hall in Cleveland.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 13, 1988 | By Daniel Webster, Inquirer Music Critic
The Cleveland Orchestra is performing at a very high level, if current recordings are a fair measure of its quality. The orchestral sound is transparent, warm and full of life, and the playing is unforced but dynamic. It sounds like an orchestra at peace with itself and its conductor. The Clevelanders, like almost all other major orchestras, are recording Beethoven symphonies, and have paired Symphonies No. 5 and 7 on the latest issue (Telarc CD-80163). Christoph von Dohnanyi has the seeming knack of conducting the music without imposing a very strong personal imprint on it. The performances sound as if they happened in the most logical, natural way, without mannerism, without forcing unnecessary color or accents onto the musical structure.
NEWS
February 10, 2009 | By Peter Dobrin INQUIRER MUSIC CRITIC
The Cleveland Orchestra reaches the ears like some improbable expression of perfection in sound. Visiting the Kimmel Center Sunday afternoon with music director Franz Welser-M?st in Mozart's Symphony No. 25 in G Minor (K. 183), the Cleveland offered a stunning rebuttal to anyone listening for slipping standards. The machine is oiled, the gears are tight, and in this exposed piece every last detail was worked out - dynamics, articulation, phrasing, transitions, length of notes, everything.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 15, 2011 | By David Patrick Stearns, Inquirer Music Critic
Cleveland Orchestra principal flutist Joshua Smith left his audience wanting an encore, but seemed not to have one to deliver - an emblematic moment illustrating how flutists must search far and wide for first-class solo repertoire. Even his handpicked program, presented Tuesday by the Philadelphia Chamber Music Society at the American Philosophical Society, had composers not known to attract Philadelphia ticket-buyers, from Carl Reinecke (whose music suggests that the world hasn't enough Mendelssohn)
NEWS
February 10, 2003 | By Peter Dobrin INQUIRER MUSIC CRITIC
Home-team advantage? No, in the realm of orchestras and the cities they tour, often the best concerts are performed away from home. Two factors can conspire toward greatness on the road: Playing the same pieces over and over means a better-rehearsed and more cohesive interpretation. And an ensemble is really on its mettle when it knows that the audience is dotted with members of a rival orchestra. Those qualifiers out of the way, the Cleveland Orchestra's concert Friday night in Verizon Hall was nothing less than astonishing.
NEWS
February 24, 1990 | By Daniel Webster, Inquirer Music Critic
Joshua Smith finally played principal flute in the orchestra at the Curtis Institute of Music last week. Normally, there would be nothing particularly unusual about that. Student musicians ascend to the first chairs in their sections over time, and Smith still has a year to go before finishing his formal conservatory training. Three weeks earlier, however, the 20-year-old Smith had been named principal flutist of the Cleveland Orchestra - one of the top jobs in his profession. With the announcement, Smith's relationships with his colleagues at Curtis inevitably changed.
NEWS
March 19, 2015 | By Walter F. Naedele, Inquirer Staff Writer
A memorial service and concert have been set to honor former Philadelphia Orchestra principal cellist William Stokking, 81, of Medford. The service is to be at 2:30 p.m. Sunday, April 12, at the Unitarian Universalist Church, 401 Kings Highway N., Cherry Hill. The concert is to be at 3 p.m. Saturday, May 9, at Field Concert Hall of the Curtis Institute of Music, 1726 Locust St. His wife, Nancy, said both events are open to the public. Mr. Stokking, who retired from the orchestra in 2005, died Sunday, Dec. 14, 2014, at a Moorestown nursing home of complications from a stroke.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 22, 2015 | By Peter Dobrin, Inquirer Music Critic
Cellist Oliver Aldort remembers being struck by a particular quality of the Boston Symphony Orchestra while playing in the ensemble as a 17-year-old student at the Tanglewood Institute. "I had been used to a conservatory orchestra in which everyone is young and there is a constant turnover of players," he says, "and I had been used to the fact that so often the conductor will give the downbeat and there will be a lot of hesitation. . . . With the BSO, the orchestra had such a unified sense of rhythm as an ensemble - it was the easiest thing to play with.
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
March 19, 2015 | By Walter F. Naedele, Inquirer Staff Writer
A memorial service and concert have been set to honor former Philadelphia Orchestra principal cellist William Stokking, 81, of Medford. The service is to be at 2:30 p.m. Sunday, April 12, at the Unitarian Universalist Church, 401 Kings Highway N., Cherry Hill. The concert is to be at 3 p.m. Saturday, May 9, at Field Concert Hall of the Curtis Institute of Music, 1726 Locust St. His wife, Nancy, said both events are open to the public. Mr. Stokking, who retired from the orchestra in 2005, died Sunday, Dec. 14, 2014, at a Moorestown nursing home of complications from a stroke.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 28, 2015 | By Peter Dobrin, Inquirer Music Critic
Five or six decades have passed since Herbert von Karajan's advocacy for Sibelius established an international sound concept on the composer's coattails. Polished and cool, Karajan's recordings of the Sibelius symphonies might have done more to advance the cause of ensemble perfection than of the composer. They were beautiful and superficial. And they were hardly the last word. Osmo Vänskä seemed to be dismantling Karajan's legacy phrase by phrase Sunday afternoon in a remarkable appearance with the orchestra of the Curtis Institute of Music in Verizon Hall.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 22, 2015 | By Peter Dobrin, Inquirer Music Critic
Cellist Oliver Aldort remembers being struck by a particular quality of the Boston Symphony Orchestra while playing in the ensemble as a 17-year-old student at the Tanglewood Institute. "I had been used to a conservatory orchestra in which everyone is young and there is a constant turnover of players," he says, "and I had been used to the fact that so often the conductor will give the downbeat and there will be a lot of hesitation. . . . With the BSO, the orchestra had such a unified sense of rhythm as an ensemble - it was the easiest thing to play with.
NEWS
December 22, 2014 | By David O'Reilly, Inquirer Staff Writer
William Stokking, 81, retired principal cellist of the Philadelphia Orchestra and former faculty member of the Curtis Institute, died Sunday, Dec. 14, at a Moorestown nursing home of complications from a stroke. Esteemed for his refined tone, Mr. Stokking joined the orchestra in 1960 and played for six years under Eugene Ormandy before departing to play as principal with the Chamber Symphony of Philadelphia. Upon the chamber group's demise, he played for the Boston Philharmonic and as principal with the Cleveland Orchestra under George Szell before returning to the Philadelphia Orchestra in 1973.
NEWS
April 6, 2014 | By Peter Dobrin, Inquirer Music Critic
When you have an excellent clarinetist at your disposal, you send him out on stage with the Mozart concerto and crowds will swoon. But Ricardo Morales is no excellent clarinetist. He is a superlative one. For him on Thursday night, nothing less than the formidable   Weber Clarinet Concerto No. 1 would do, and the capacity audience roared. Christoph von Dohnányi was on the podium, and, rounding out the Philadelphia Orchestra program in Verizon Hall with Brahms and Beethoven, he won traditionalist hearts.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 3, 2012 | By Peter Dobrin, Inquirer Music Critic
How much money is a principal oboist worth? A section violinist? What about the president of a struggling symphony orchestra? Or a third-grade teacher, for that matter? Not long ago, I found myself explaining to my tween son why certain things he covets - a trendy brand of ear phones, in this case - command a high price, and why price tags are often divorced from justice and logic. It has always been true and always will be: Nothing has intrinsic value; something fetches only what someone is willing to pay for it. What someone is willing to pay for orchestral musicians in this country has changed radically in recent weeks.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 19, 2012 | By David Patrick Stearns, Inquirer Music Critic
Call it the Wolfgang Sawallisch effect. At age 84, conductor Herbert Blomstedt has conducted throughout Europe and the United States with inspired solidity for a half century. And, like Sawallisch in his final Philadelphia years, the professorial Blomstedt isn't fading into old-age mellowness; instead, he has acquired forceful intensity. The Philadelphia Orchestra is the latest topflight ensemble to have Blomstedt as an honored guest, in a career marked by serial music directorships from Dresden to San Francisco to Leipzig.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 15, 2011 | By David Patrick Stearns, Inquirer Music Critic
Cleveland Orchestra principal flutist Joshua Smith left his audience wanting an encore, but seemed not to have one to deliver - an emblematic moment illustrating how flutists must search far and wide for first-class solo repertoire. Even his handpicked program, presented Tuesday by the Philadelphia Chamber Music Society at the American Philosophical Society, had composers not known to attract Philadelphia ticket-buyers, from Carl Reinecke (whose music suggests that the world hasn't enough Mendelssohn)
NEWS
March 18, 2011 | By Bryan Marquard, BOSTON GLOBE
Alfred Genovese, 79, a native Philadelphian and oboist whose fine phrasing and generous playing helped elevate the performances of Boston Symphony Orchestra musicians for 21 years, died last Friday at the Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania of complications from cardiac arrest. Soft and sweet, expressive as a voice, the sounds that Mr. Genovese coaxed from his oboe lingered in the memories of audiences and musicians decades after the notes faded. His approach to playing was formed in part by Marcel Tabuteau, a legendary oboist who trained generations of the world's best players, including Mr. Genovese, his last student.
NEWS
October 18, 2010 | By David Patrick Stearns, Inquirer Music Critic
Conductor Christoph von Dohnanyi celebrated some high-profile 80th birthday concerts last year with all-Brahms programs, and now shows no signs of stopping. And by no means should he, to judge from his Saturday guest engagement with the Philadelphia Orchestra. The performances of Brahms' Symphonies Nos. 2 and 4 were as satisfying as any I've heard, but not for immediately obvious reasons. You couldn't be sure how much your response came from a fresh hearing of the music or Dohnanyi's subtlety, so seamlessly does he disappear into the music he conducts.
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
|
|
|
|
|