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NEWS
February 12, 1986 | By EDWARD MORAN, Daily News Staff Writer
Linda Solomon was not the only person late for work yesterday morning because of snow, but she probably caught more flak than anyone else. Solomon, a social worker at the city's Adult Services Center, which places homeless people in shelters, said a client who felt he had waited too long for an interview became enraged, jumped on her desk, threatened to beat her up and then left the building - but not before throwing a brick through the...
NEWS
October 4, 1988 | By Patrisia Gonzales, Inquirer Staff Writer
A Voorhees car salesman was charged yesterday with bilking 80 customers with shaky credit histories and two financial institutions of as much as $1 million. Camden County Prosecutor Samuel Asbell said Gregory Smith, a 26-year-old salesman for Stephens Chevrolet Inc. in Runnemede, falsified financial documents from July to mid-September for clients wishing to buy cars, then pocketed the loans they received for down payments on new cars. At Smith's arraignment on charges of theft by deception before Camden County Superior Court Judge Donald A. Bigley, Asbell said Smith may have been involved with a network of people.
NEWS
December 5, 1994 | by Bhavna Lad, Los Angeles Daily News
Criticizing the jury that convicted her of pandering, Heidi Fleiss said the names of clients in her "little black book" might not be kept secret much longer. A teary-eyed, emotional Fleiss spoke with reporters, signed autographs and greeted fans over the weekend at an exposition where she peddled her line of flannel underwear, one day after a seven-man, five-woman panel convicted her of three counts of pandering. Jurors deadlocked on two other pandering charges and found her not guilty on a drug charge.
NEWS
May 13, 1990 | By Cynthia Henry, Inquirer Staff Writer
Some might call the work trash. But Paul Spiker and Christopher Bailey take it very seriously. They design the wrappers that are torn away in a frenzy to get to the food inside. Grocery shoppers see their work every time they reach for a carton of ice cream or a cup of cottage cheese. In fact, they might choose a product because of Bailey and Spiker. The package "is a product's image. It's what you want to communicate about a brand and a product," said Bailey, speaking in Bailey Spiker Inc.'s office, tucked off Montgomery Avenue in Wynnewood.
NEWS
September 19, 1990 | By Joseph A. Slobodzian, Inquirer Staff Writer
A Chester County lawyer who disappeared in January - allegedly with $175,000 of his law firm's money - was charged by a federal grand jury yesterday with defrauding nine former clients of $236,505 in insurance settlements. David C. Becker, 36, was indicted on five counts of mail fraud, 12 counts of bank fraud and one count of interstate transportation of a check taken by fraud. The indictment also charges that Becker cheated a lender to his former law firm of $39,625. The U.S. Attorney's Office said that if convicted on all counts, Becker could face a maximum sentence of 270 years in prison and a $13.5 million fine.
NEWS
February 9, 2002 | Daily News Staff Report
Oscar Gaskins, a civil rights activist and lawyer who had a number of noteworthy clients over the years, was charged yesterday with stealing close to $500,000 from some lesser known ones. Gaskins was accused of scamming $180,000 from a woman who won a medical malpractice settlement, and another $300,000 in insurance money from two sons of a widow. During his career as an attorney, Gaskins defended such clients as former mob boss Nicky Scarfo; one of the defendants in the Eddie Polec murder; and one of the developers accused of stealing money in the MOVE rebuilding.
BUSINESS
March 21, 1990 | The Inquirer Staff
Donald C. Carter, an adviser to prominent takeover specialists of the 1980s, pleaded guilty yesterday in state Supreme Court in Manhattan to stealing $1 million from his clients and evading and falsifying state income taxes. Ronald Goldstock, director of the New York State Organized Crime Task Force, said that between 1984 and 1989 Carter routinely billed his clients for nonexistent or inflated expenses, and when questioned, supplied fraudulent documentation to justify the expenses.
BUSINESS
October 27, 1991 | By Janet L. Fix, Inquirer Staff Writer
No one ever likes getting bills from lawyers. They like it a lot less when times are tough. Such as now. And lawyers are feeling it now as never before: Law firms, for the first time, are finding they are not recession-proof. "I used to get calls saying, 'I want you to represent me.' Now they want information on the firm, its rate structure, the qualifications of the attorneys, and even references on occasion," said Robert Korn, senior partner with the Philadelphia firm Korn, Kline & Kutner before it dissolved last summer and he joined Starfield, Payne & Korn.
NEWS
February 8, 1989 | By Linda Loyd, Inquirer Staff Writer
A Philadelphia businessman pleaded guilty yesterday to federal charges that he defrauded 34 clients of more than $1 million by accepting money and then failing to provide the financial services he promised. Jesse C. Levine, 49, of Hampton Road in Chestnut Hill, was indicted by a federal grand jury in August. He pleaded guilty to 19 counts of mail fraud, four counts of wire fraud and 12 counts of interstate transportation of securities obtained by fraud. Assistant U.S. Attorney Linda Dale Hoffa said that if the case had gone to trial, the government would have presented evidence that from 1983 to 1985 Levine told clients he could arrange loans from $1 million to $25 million for fees of $10,000 to $100,000.
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NEWS
September 1, 2016 | By Julie Shaw, STAFF WRITER
A Philadelphia bar owner and former Montgomery County stockbroker pleaded guilty Tuesday to defrauding clients - many elderly - of more than $400,000 and using their money to purchase his South Street bar, the U.S. Attorney's Office said. William Joseph Boyle, 47, of Bala Cynwyd, who owns the Boyler Room bar at 328 South St. in Queen Village, pleaded guilty before U.S. District Judge Harvey Bartle III to all charges against him - five counts of mail fraud, three counts of wire fraud, and one count each of securities fraud and investment-adviser fraud.
NEWS
July 9, 2016
In a story Thursday about high bails set for juveniles tried as adults, the amount of time Lauren Fine's juvenile clients have been locked up pretrial was misstated. The cofounder of the Youth Sentencing and Reentry Project said that while some juvenile clients are able to be released or moved to juvenile court within months, others have been locked up for one to three years pretrial.
NEWS
July 3, 2016 | By Julie Shaw, STAFF WRITER
A former Montgomery County stockbroker has been indicted on fraud charges, accused of swindling clients - many elderly - out of $415,000 and spending their money on himself, his family, and to buy a bar on Philadelphia's South Street, the U.S. Attorney's Office said Friday. William Joseph Boyle, 47, of Bala Cynwyd, was indicted Thursday on five counts of mail fraud, three counts of wire fraud, and one count each of securities fraud and investment adviser fraud. Boyle was permanently barred from working as a stockbroker and investment adviser in March 2009.
BUSINESS
June 28, 2016 | By Erin E. Arvedlund, Staff Writer
The British changed the course of history and voted to exit the European Union. Here in the United States, we'll feel that shift in our portfolios, as stocks, bonds, and other assets become more volatile. Gold and other precious metals, on the other hand, were rising sharply as a momentous week came to a close, as were U.S. Treasuries - all considered safe havens. "The long-lasting effects of this volatility will depend on how major central banks decide to reassure markets and the next steps the British Parliament, various political parties in the U.K., and the rest of Europe take to address the departure," Brandywine Global in Philadelphia, a division of Legg Mason, wrote in a note to clients Friday.
NEWS
June 26, 2016 | By Chris Mondics, Staff Writer
For now, the status quo will remain. The decision by United Kingdom voters to exit the European Union means the British government must now negotiate the terms of its withdrawal, which could take up to two years. The stakes are enormous for Europe and much of the world. London could lose its primacy as an investment center. Yet the effect on the U.S. economy will likely be small. Certainly, the news rattled the stock market, which saw a 610-point drop in the Dow Jones industrial average Friday.
NEWS
June 15, 2016 | By Don Sapatkin, Staff Writer
Thirty years ago, when medicine could do little for people with HIV, Kevin J. Burns was a volunteer in a buddy system where buddies never came back. "By and large, we did hospice care, helping people die with dignity," Burns said in recalling the early days of ActionAIDS, which grew into one of the largest and best recognized HIV services organizations in Philadelphia. When lifesaving drugs became available, a priority became getting them to clients. Gradually, as people lived longer, the organization provided more services to manage a range of chronic diseases - HIV being a key one, but not the only one - that afflicted its patients.
NEWS
June 14, 2016 | By Susan Snyder, Staff Writer
A longtime Villanova professor accused of accessing child pornography on a campus computer in March had someone looking over his shoulder: a security firm that the university had hired to monitor its computer network. Within 20 minutes, BTB Security identified the building and floor where the computer was located and alerted Villanova, kicking off an investigation that led to the arrest of Christopher Haas, a tenured associate professor of history and classical studies. The discovery was one of many security breaches that BTB, a cybersecurity and digital-forensics company, says it uncovers for clients every year.
BUSINESS
May 8, 2016 | By Chris Mondics, Staff Writer
It was only two years ago that Pittsburgh-based Buchanan Ingersoll & Rooney pulled off the second-largest merger in its history with the acquisition of 90-lawyer Fowler White Boggs and its five offices in Florida. Now, the firm is on the hunt again, seeking to fill geographical needs on the East Coast, and in California and Texas. The point man for all this is incoming CEO and chairman, Joe Dougherty, who will take the reins June 1. Dougherty, who is Philly-based and is the first Buchanan chair outside Pittsburgh, sees no urgent need to grow, and says the firm will be picky about expansion.
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