CollectionsClimate Change
IN THE NEWS

Climate Change

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
April 16, 2004
In an April 4 letter ("Bush has already made climate change a priority issue"), Conrad Lautenbacher reveals the Bush administration's short-sighted views on both economic development and environmental safety. A recent conference sponsored by the Widener University School of Law ("Facing Climate Change: Tools and Opportunities for Pennsylvania"), called attention to success stories of U.S. companies and cities in reducing greenhouse gas emissions - and doing so profitably. In fact, many of the reductions went far beyond those called for by the Kyoto Protocol, which the Bush administration has failed to back.
NEWS
February 19, 2013 | By Sandy Bauers, Inquirer Staff Writer
More than 500 people from the region joined thousands of protesters Sunday in Washington, calling for strong action on climate change and a stop to the Keystone XL pipeline. The pipeline would transport oil from Canada to the Gulf Coast. Opponents say it would worsen climate change by encouraging further development of the tar-sands oil resource. They spent several hours in the bitter cold and a strong wind cheering, waving signs, listening to speakers, and marching around the White House, although President Obama was in Florida for a golf game.
NEWS
August 23, 2011 | By Jim Efstathiou Jr., Bloomberg News
Michael Mann, a Pennsylvania climate-change researcher caught in the flap surrounding e-mails hacked from a British university server, was cleared of wrongdoing by a U.S. agency that promotes science. Finding no "evidence of research misconduct," the Arlington, Va.-based National Science Foundation closed its inquiry into Mann, according to an Aug. 15 report from its inspector general. In February, Pennsylvania State University, where Mann is a professor of meteorology, exonerated him of suppressing or falsifying data, deleting e-mails, and misusing privileged information.
NEWS
September 10, 2009
By Denis O'Brien and Jan Jarrett National climate-change legislation passed by the House in June will come before the Senate this fall. The final bill, if wisely crafted, will save families money, significantly reduce our dependence on foreign oil, and create millions of well-paying American jobs, including a significant number of green jobs right here in Pennsylvania. Climate change poses a profound threat to our national security, the environment, and the global economy.
NEWS
April 25, 2009 | By Joseph Hannan INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
New Jersey State Museum officials want you to imagine walruses swimming along the state's coastline and wooly, gray musk oxen roaming the terrain. That might seem like science fiction, but it's actually a look at New Jersey more than 100,000 years ago. And while those creatures are gone, officials say learning about them can provide a valuable lesson to children and adults visiting the exhibit "Rising Tide: Climate Change and New Jersey. " Yesterday, fourth graders bustled about the exhibit, their excited cries echoing off the tile floors.
NEWS
June 24, 2009 | By Laurie Williams and Allan Zabel
We would support legislation in Congress to address climate change if it were capable of accomplishing that goal. Unfortunately, despite the best intentions of its proponents, the bill known as Waxman-Markey would disable our ability to reduce greenhouse-gas emissions for at least a decade, hugely increasing the risk of irreversible climate calamity. We are speaking as individuals based on our more than 20 years of experience as public-sector environmental-enforcement attorneys, including extensive experience in California with the sort of cap-and-trade program now being proposed in Washington.
NEWS
August 29, 2008 | Carlos Pascual and Strobe Talbott
Carlos Pascual and Strobe Talbott of the Brookings Institution The world may have only seven years to start reducing the annual buildup in greenhouse-gas emissions that otherwise threatens global catastrophe within several decades. That means that between Inauguration Day in January 2009 and 2015, either John McCain or Barack Obama will face the most momentous political challenge of all time. Reflecting a consensus of hundreds of scientists around the world, the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change has affirmed that greenhouse-gas emissions are raising the Earth's temperature.
NEWS
December 7, 2008 | By John Shiffman and John Sullivan, Inquirer Staff Writers
WASHINGTON - On Dec. 5, 2007, EPA Administrator Stephen L. Johnson prepared to send the White House an extraordinary document. It declared that climate change imperiled the public welfare - a decision that would trigger the nation's first mandatory global-warming regulations. Johnson, a career scientist, knew that his draft would meet with resistance from antiregulatory ideologues at the White House, but he believed the science was solid. According to confidential records reviewed by The Inquirer, Johnson cited strong evidence: rises in sea level, extreme hot and cold days, ecosystem changes, melting glaciers, and more.
NEWS
December 7, 2008 | By John Shiffman and John Sullivan INQUIRER STAFF WRITERS
On Dec. 5, 2007, EPA Administrator Stephen L. Johnson prepared to send the White House an extraordinary document. It declared that climate change imperiled the public welfare - a decision that would trigger the nation's first mandatory global-warming regulations. Johnson, a career scientist, knew that his draft would meet with resistance from antiregulatory ideologues at the White House, but he believed the science was solid. According to confidential records reviewed by The Inquirer, Johnson cited strong evidence: rises in sea level, extreme hot and cold days, ecosystem changes, melting glaciers, and more.
NEWS
August 23, 2010 | By Marshall Saunders
Legend has it that Nero fiddled while Rome burned. These days, Congress fiddles while the world burns. More precisely, it's Russia that's burning at the moment, with a record heat wave and forest fires being blamed for as many as 15,000 deaths so far. Also troubling is the drought, which prompted the Russian government to ban wheat exports this year, sending shock waves through global food markets. And as Russia burns, Pakistan drowns, with record rainfall producing floods that have affected 20 million people.
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
January 3, 2016 | By Tom Avril, Staff Writer
Feodor Pitcairn had been to Iceland seven times with his trusty Hasselblad cameras, capturing a wild landscape of glaciers, steaming geothermal gases, and vivid green mosses. But what he really wanted was an active volcano. Pitcairn, of Bryn Athyn, had just about given up when he got the call in late August 2014. Within days he was leaning out the side of a helicopter, orange lava spurting below. Images from that trip and the others are featured in an exhibit at the Smithsonian National Museum of Natural History in Washington through April 2017.
NEWS
January 2, 2016
By Veerabhadran Ramanathan and Daniel Press Among climate scientists, the consensus is that we must become carbon-neutral by 2050 to avoid catastrophic environmental disruptions. Negotiators at the recent summit in Paris accordingly focused on curbing carbon dioxide emissions. There's a major problem, however, with a CO2-centric strategy. Because carbon dioxide remains in the atmosphere for a century or more, and because we won't abandon fossil fuels overnight, neutrality by 2050 simply isn't good enough to keep the Earth from warming 2 degrees Celsius - the generally agreed-upon limit - much less the ambitious goal of 1.5 degrees Celsius that many nations support.
NEWS
December 21, 2015 | By Michaelle Bond, Staff Writer
A week after world officials reached a historic agreement in Paris to limit greenhouse gas emissions to fight climate change, a group of local environmental activists gathered Saturday in Philadelphia to energize each other for the city's role. "It will come down to the local [levels] and states to really lead the way," said Anthony Giancatarino, director of the energy democracy program at the Center for Social Inclusion. "We actually have a huge role to play. " The international agreement gives Philadelphia "a backdrop to be ambitious" in its actions to curb climate change, said Giancatarino, who is also chair of the policy committee at Green Justice Philly.
NEWS
December 8, 2015 | By David O'Reilly, Inquirer Staff Writer
While many American Jews are committed to social justice issues, climate change is a cause they have been "slow to embrace," a rabbi told a conference in Bala Cynwyd on Sunday. "Why is climate change not a Jewish issue?" Rabbi Nina Beth Cardin asked the 40 people gathered at Temple Adath Israel for an afternoon program titled "Protecting Creation. " The answer might be that many Jews are focused on causes like civil rights, fair labor, the security of Israel, and the needs of the poor and elderly, Cardin proposed.
NEWS
December 5, 2015
ISSUE | CLIMATE Bay watch Thanks for the editorial "Weaker than the storms" (Tuesday). Discussions of storm damage always seem to focus on ocean-side dunes and crashing waves behind weather reporters. But on a barrier island like Long Beach Island, storm surges can destroy the homes, properties, and lives of those who live on the bay side. All the dune-building in the world will not have an impact on bay-side storm surges, in which the low-lying land is no match for the rapidly rising water.
NEWS
December 2, 2015
HAVE THEY gone crazy? From reports of the kinds of protest, some college students are auditioning for "The Gong Show. " Today's activists are the minority of college youth, as they always are, and are starved for an inspirational, generation-defining issue. Over the weekend, journalist and analyst Juan Williams said something that summarized my thoughts. When he was in college, he and his activist friends had explosive issues such as segregation, voting rights, the draft, the Vietnam War to protest.
NEWS
November 23, 2015
ISSUE | CITY FIREFIGHTERS Keep Sawyer at helm As a proud supporter of Mayor-elect Jim Kenney, Club Valiants, a Philadelphia association of minority firefighters, urges him to retain Derrick Sawyer as the city's fire commissioner. Sawyer embodies the qualities that every successful leader must have: competence, knowledge, courage, loyalty, and dedication. Sawyer is a self-driven and meticulous individual who can multitask and function in high-stress, fast-paced environments. He is a quantitative and analytical thinker with a professional attitude and diligent work ethic.
NEWS
November 20, 2015
ISSUE | CLIMATE CHANGE Focus on today Amy Feldman, the Narberth homeowner who came to appreciate the effects of environmental conditions on health and became an active member of the Citizens' Climate Lobby, should reconsider her support for the CCL's dangerous plans ("A facelift for this cold house," Sunday). Around the world, people suffer because of climate change. Yet aid agencies are unable to properly help them because of the nearly $1 billion spent globally every day on climate finance, only 7 percent is dedicated to adaptation support.
NEWS
November 12, 2015 | Inquirer Editorial Board
At the end of the Obama administration's speed-of-tar deliberations on the Keystone XL pipeline, even the president acknowledged that the project was not especially important to the environment or the economy. Which raises a question: Why on earth did he spend seven years considering it, let alone take the unprecedented step of smiting it by presidential fiat? The answer, of course, is that environmentalists decreed Keystone a symbol of global climate change and fought it as if it were the pipeline to the planet's watery doom.
NEWS
November 4, 2015
ISSUE | PROCESSED MEATS New warnings are tough to stomach It can boggle one's mind when all these reports of foods that are unhealthy come out ("Beware that bacon burger - processed meat linked to cancer," Oct. 27). There are a plethora of diets, some of which conflict with each other. Now, the World Health Organization reports that processed foods are harmful. I don't doubt the science, but the absolute risk is rather low and seems to reflect the group that ate processed foods daily.
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
|
|
|
|
|