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Climate Change

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NEWS
April 16, 2004
In an April 4 letter ("Bush has already made climate change a priority issue"), Conrad Lautenbacher reveals the Bush administration's short-sighted views on both economic development and environmental safety. A recent conference sponsored by the Widener University School of Law ("Facing Climate Change: Tools and Opportunities for Pennsylvania"), called attention to success stories of U.S. companies and cities in reducing greenhouse gas emissions - and doing so profitably. In fact, many of the reductions went far beyond those called for by the Kyoto Protocol, which the Bush administration has failed to back.
NEWS
February 19, 2013 | By Sandy Bauers, Inquirer Staff Writer
More than 500 people from the region joined thousands of protesters Sunday in Washington, calling for strong action on climate change and a stop to the Keystone XL pipeline. The pipeline would transport oil from Canada to the Gulf Coast. Opponents say it would worsen climate change by encouraging further development of the tar-sands oil resource. They spent several hours in the bitter cold and a strong wind cheering, waving signs, listening to speakers, and marching around the White House, although President Obama was in Florida for a golf game.
NEWS
August 23, 2011 | By Jim Efstathiou Jr., Bloomberg News
Michael Mann, a Pennsylvania climate-change researcher caught in the flap surrounding e-mails hacked from a British university server, was cleared of wrongdoing by a U.S. agency that promotes science. Finding no "evidence of research misconduct," the Arlington, Va.-based National Science Foundation closed its inquiry into Mann, according to an Aug. 15 report from its inspector general. In February, Pennsylvania State University, where Mann is a professor of meteorology, exonerated him of suppressing or falsifying data, deleting e-mails, and misusing privileged information.
NEWS
September 10, 2009
By Denis O'Brien and Jan Jarrett National climate-change legislation passed by the House in June will come before the Senate this fall. The final bill, if wisely crafted, will save families money, significantly reduce our dependence on foreign oil, and create millions of well-paying American jobs, including a significant number of green jobs right here in Pennsylvania. Climate change poses a profound threat to our national security, the environment, and the global economy.
NEWS
April 25, 2009 | By Joseph Hannan INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
New Jersey State Museum officials want you to imagine walruses swimming along the state's coastline and wooly, gray musk oxen roaming the terrain. That might seem like science fiction, but it's actually a look at New Jersey more than 100,000 years ago. And while those creatures are gone, officials say learning about them can provide a valuable lesson to children and adults visiting the exhibit "Rising Tide: Climate Change and New Jersey. " Yesterday, fourth graders bustled about the exhibit, their excited cries echoing off the tile floors.
NEWS
June 24, 2009 | By Laurie Williams and Allan Zabel
We would support legislation in Congress to address climate change if it were capable of accomplishing that goal. Unfortunately, despite the best intentions of its proponents, the bill known as Waxman-Markey would disable our ability to reduce greenhouse-gas emissions for at least a decade, hugely increasing the risk of irreversible climate calamity. We are speaking as individuals based on our more than 20 years of experience as public-sector environmental-enforcement attorneys, including extensive experience in California with the sort of cap-and-trade program now being proposed in Washington.
NEWS
August 29, 2008 | Carlos Pascual and Strobe Talbott
Carlos Pascual and Strobe Talbott of the Brookings Institution The world may have only seven years to start reducing the annual buildup in greenhouse-gas emissions that otherwise threatens global catastrophe within several decades. That means that between Inauguration Day in January 2009 and 2015, either John McCain or Barack Obama will face the most momentous political challenge of all time. Reflecting a consensus of hundreds of scientists around the world, the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change has affirmed that greenhouse-gas emissions are raising the Earth's temperature.
NEWS
December 7, 2008 | By John Shiffman and John Sullivan, Inquirer Staff Writers
WASHINGTON - On Dec. 5, 2007, EPA Administrator Stephen L. Johnson prepared to send the White House an extraordinary document. It declared that climate change imperiled the public welfare - a decision that would trigger the nation's first mandatory global-warming regulations. Johnson, a career scientist, knew that his draft would meet with resistance from antiregulatory ideologues at the White House, but he believed the science was solid. According to confidential records reviewed by The Inquirer, Johnson cited strong evidence: rises in sea level, extreme hot and cold days, ecosystem changes, melting glaciers, and more.
NEWS
December 7, 2008 | By John Shiffman and John Sullivan INQUIRER STAFF WRITERS
On Dec. 5, 2007, EPA Administrator Stephen L. Johnson prepared to send the White House an extraordinary document. It declared that climate change imperiled the public welfare - a decision that would trigger the nation's first mandatory global-warming regulations. Johnson, a career scientist, knew that his draft would meet with resistance from antiregulatory ideologues at the White House, but he believed the science was solid. According to confidential records reviewed by The Inquirer, Johnson cited strong evidence: rises in sea level, extreme hot and cold days, ecosystem changes, melting glaciers, and more.
NEWS
August 23, 2010 | By Marshall Saunders
Legend has it that Nero fiddled while Rome burned. These days, Congress fiddles while the world burns. More precisely, it's Russia that's burning at the moment, with a record heat wave and forest fires being blamed for as many as 15,000 deaths so far. Also troubling is the drought, which prompted the Russian government to ban wheat exports this year, sending shock waves through global food markets. And as Russia burns, Pakistan drowns, with record rainfall producing floods that have affected 20 million people.
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ENTERTAINMENT
June 4, 2016 | By Tirdad Derakhshani, Staff Writer
Which do you prefer: hope or truth? It's a tough question when it comes to films about the environment. Do you want alarmist stats about global warming, deforestation, and the lack of clean water in poor regions? Or bromides about how our ingenuity can solve it all? Al Gore went with hard facts in 2006's An Inconvenient Truth , which tried to convert global-warming deniers. A decade later, America remains divided. Perhaps that's why Charles Ferguson's documentary Time to Choose is so upbeat.
NEWS
May 23, 2016 | By Tirdad Derakhshani, Staff Writer
Launched in February 1996, Democracy Now! was born of a unique idea: an hour-long daily syndicated public radio news show focused entirely on the presidential election. Hosted by veteran journalist Amy Goodman, the show aired on five stations and was supposed to go dark after Election Day. Twenty years have passed and Democracy Now! still airs every day. Of course, it's grown a bit: Today, it's carried by 1,400 radio and TV stations around the world and is available online at www.democracynow.org . (Locally, it's available on several stations and is also carried by DirecTV, Dish Network, Verizon Fios, and Comcast.)
NEWS
May 10, 2016
IF THERE were a place that you could call Ground Zero in the wars over climate change, it might be the Canadian province of Alberta. In the latest chapter in humankind's opioid-like addiction to fossil fuels, energy companies have been extracting dense, dirty oil from that region's deposits of tar sands -- a kind of fuel that is wasteful to extract and emits more carbon pollution when it's finally burned. The added burden of the tar sands oil on our looming global-warming crisis caused U.S. activists to raise a tremendous stink over the Keystone XL pipeline, which would have shipped this dirty fuel right through the American Heartland on its way to Gulf Coast ports and then to foreign markets like China.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 7, 2016 | By Samantha Melamed, Staff Writer
Nathan Kleinman and Dusty Hinz met during the Occupy movement, camped out on the concrete outside City Hall. Four years later, they're still organizing, but in a more verdant setting: a peaceful patch of farmland off a rutted dirt drive outside Elmer, N.J. Their goal now: Harness the power of the crowd for the future of farming. Their organization, the Experimental Farm Network, aims to connect plant breeders with gardeners and citizen scientists around the world to develop sustainable, perennial food crops that can flourish in the face of climate change.
NEWS
May 1, 2016
Half-Earth Our Planet's Fight for Life By E.O. Wilson Liveright. 272 pp. $25.95 Reviewed by Mike Weilbacher Entomologist Edward O. Wilson, the modern era's Rachel Carson, has an audacious idea that might jump-start a lagging conversation about a burning issue. "I propose," he writes in Half-Earth: Our Planet's Fight for Life , "that only by committing half of the planet's surface to nature can we hope to save the immensity of life-forms that compose it. " That's right: Half-Earth asks us to set aside half the world for the rest of creation.
NEWS
April 13, 2016
By H. Sterling Burnett President Obama is hostile to open debate and research that contradicts his opinions and policies. The most recent evidence of this came last month, when Attorney General Loretta Lynch gave testimony before the Senate Judiciary Committee and said the Department of Justice has discussed pursuing legal action against companies, research institutions, and scientists who debate whether humans are causing catastrophic climate...
NEWS
April 13, 2016
By Michael E. Kraft Most of us recognize the value of science in dealing with complex problems that pose significant risks to public health and well-being. Thus we expect reputable science to be reported and used in helping us make difficult policy choices, such as what to do about climate change. Scientific findings and associated uncertainties should be scrutinized carefully and debated vigorously within the scientific community and among the public. However, denying the best scientific evidence we have could lead to greater societal harm than if we had taken sensible action when reliable knowledge was first available.
NEWS
April 4, 2016
ISSUE | CLIMATE CHANGE No time to wait It is important that we take seriously the predictions of sea-level rise cited in last week's edition of the journal Nature ("Alarm on sea level rises to new heights," Thursday). The study illustrates that climate disruption can have a greater impact in a shorter time frame than had been projected: Oceans could rise by more than 6 feet by the end of the century if high levels of greenhouse-gas emissions continue. Many researchers have cautioned that conditions in the Mid-Atlantic region are likely to be worse than the global average.
NEWS
April 2, 2016
ISSUE | TERRORISM The price of comfort U.S. Rep. Brendan F. Boyle's commentary blames "militant Islamism" for the war that has produced terrorist attacks around the globe ("The defining struggle of this generation," Monday). Militant Islamism may be the most obvious explanation, but there's a much more significant underlying cause: The world is becoming divided into haves and have-nots, and the have-nots are increasingly not accepting this. Each year, about 25 percent of the world's resources are consumed by the 5 percent of the world's population that lives in the United States.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 1, 2016 | By Bill Chenevert, For The Inquirer
There's a reason so many teenagers turn to punk music - it speaks to adolescence and to a very pointed, woke teenager, one who reveres antiestablishment politics or noncommercial art. And there's something pure in that, a resistance mentality that's too often lost on a ton of teens who buy in, wholesale, to a pop-culture landscape that values uncited pastiche, thoughtlessly co-opts standardized notions of beauty, and refuses to think for itself....
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