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Climate Change

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NEWS
April 16, 2004
In an April 4 letter ("Bush has already made climate change a priority issue"), Conrad Lautenbacher reveals the Bush administration's short-sighted views on both economic development and environmental safety. A recent conference sponsored by the Widener University School of Law ("Facing Climate Change: Tools and Opportunities for Pennsylvania"), called attention to success stories of U.S. companies and cities in reducing greenhouse gas emissions - and doing so profitably. In fact, many of the reductions went far beyond those called for by the Kyoto Protocol, which the Bush administration has failed to back.
NEWS
February 19, 2013 | By Sandy Bauers, Inquirer Staff Writer
More than 500 people from the region joined thousands of protesters Sunday in Washington, calling for strong action on climate change and a stop to the Keystone XL pipeline. The pipeline would transport oil from Canada to the Gulf Coast. Opponents say it would worsen climate change by encouraging further development of the tar-sands oil resource. They spent several hours in the bitter cold and a strong wind cheering, waving signs, listening to speakers, and marching around the White House, although President Obama was in Florida for a golf game.
NEWS
August 23, 2011 | By Jim Efstathiou Jr., Bloomberg News
Michael Mann, a Pennsylvania climate-change researcher caught in the flap surrounding e-mails hacked from a British university server, was cleared of wrongdoing by a U.S. agency that promotes science. Finding no "evidence of research misconduct," the Arlington, Va.-based National Science Foundation closed its inquiry into Mann, according to an Aug. 15 report from its inspector general. In February, Pennsylvania State University, where Mann is a professor of meteorology, exonerated him of suppressing or falsifying data, deleting e-mails, and misusing privileged information.
NEWS
September 10, 2009
By Denis O'Brien and Jan Jarrett National climate-change legislation passed by the House in June will come before the Senate this fall. The final bill, if wisely crafted, will save families money, significantly reduce our dependence on foreign oil, and create millions of well-paying American jobs, including a significant number of green jobs right here in Pennsylvania. Climate change poses a profound threat to our national security, the environment, and the global economy.
NEWS
April 25, 2009 | By Joseph Hannan INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
New Jersey State Museum officials want you to imagine walruses swimming along the state's coastline and wooly, gray musk oxen roaming the terrain. That might seem like science fiction, but it's actually a look at New Jersey more than 100,000 years ago. And while those creatures are gone, officials say learning about them can provide a valuable lesson to children and adults visiting the exhibit "Rising Tide: Climate Change and New Jersey. " Yesterday, fourth graders bustled about the exhibit, their excited cries echoing off the tile floors.
NEWS
June 24, 2009 | By Laurie Williams and Allan Zabel
We would support legislation in Congress to address climate change if it were capable of accomplishing that goal. Unfortunately, despite the best intentions of its proponents, the bill known as Waxman-Markey would disable our ability to reduce greenhouse-gas emissions for at least a decade, hugely increasing the risk of irreversible climate calamity. We are speaking as individuals based on our more than 20 years of experience as public-sector environmental-enforcement attorneys, including extensive experience in California with the sort of cap-and-trade program now being proposed in Washington.
NEWS
August 29, 2008 | Carlos Pascual and Strobe Talbott
Carlos Pascual and Strobe Talbott of the Brookings Institution The world may have only seven years to start reducing the annual buildup in greenhouse-gas emissions that otherwise threatens global catastrophe within several decades. That means that between Inauguration Day in January 2009 and 2015, either John McCain or Barack Obama will face the most momentous political challenge of all time. Reflecting a consensus of hundreds of scientists around the world, the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change has affirmed that greenhouse-gas emissions are raising the Earth's temperature.
NEWS
December 7, 2008 | By John Shiffman and John Sullivan, Inquirer Staff Writers
WASHINGTON - On Dec. 5, 2007, EPA Administrator Stephen L. Johnson prepared to send the White House an extraordinary document. It declared that climate change imperiled the public welfare - a decision that would trigger the nation's first mandatory global-warming regulations. Johnson, a career scientist, knew that his draft would meet with resistance from antiregulatory ideologues at the White House, but he believed the science was solid. According to confidential records reviewed by The Inquirer, Johnson cited strong evidence: rises in sea level, extreme hot and cold days, ecosystem changes, melting glaciers, and more.
NEWS
December 7, 2008 | By John Shiffman and John Sullivan INQUIRER STAFF WRITERS
On Dec. 5, 2007, EPA Administrator Stephen L. Johnson prepared to send the White House an extraordinary document. It declared that climate change imperiled the public welfare - a decision that would trigger the nation's first mandatory global-warming regulations. Johnson, a career scientist, knew that his draft would meet with resistance from antiregulatory ideologues at the White House, but he believed the science was solid. According to confidential records reviewed by The Inquirer, Johnson cited strong evidence: rises in sea level, extreme hot and cold days, ecosystem changes, melting glaciers, and more.
NEWS
August 23, 2010 | By Marshall Saunders
Legend has it that Nero fiddled while Rome burned. These days, Congress fiddles while the world burns. More precisely, it's Russia that's burning at the moment, with a record heat wave and forest fires being blamed for as many as 15,000 deaths so far. Also troubling is the drought, which prompted the Russian government to ban wheat exports this year, sending shock waves through global food markets. And as Russia burns, Pakistan drowns, with record rainfall producing floods that have affected 20 million people.
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NEWS
August 19, 2015
ISSUE | DISCRIMINATION On knowing when to say 'Aye, aye' A county clerk refuses to issue marriage licenses to gay couples - in other words, to do her job. She is fired and ends up on the talk-show circuit, wailing and crying about how she was discriminated against because the state expected her to fulfill her properly constituted function. It reminds me that back when I was in the Navy, we had a disbursing clerk, or "DK," who refused to make payments to some sailors. Our DK thought the payments were improper even though they were authorized by rules set down by Congress - that is, by people who were way above his pay grade.
NEWS
August 17, 2015 | By Sandy Bauers, For The Inquirer
The battle over President Obama's clean power plan - in Congress and the courts, in the realms of commerce and common conversation - will rage for some time. But few are debating the value of the potential health benefits, which are expected to be significant. In the final rule announced Aug. 3, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency has set a goal of reducing carbon pollution from the power-generating sector by 32 percent below 2005 levels by 2030. This major climate-change initiative focuses on power plants because they are a major contributor to carbon pollution, accounting for one-third of all carbon emissions in the U.S. The EPA has predicted that once the reductions are met, Americans will avoid up to 90,000 asthma attacks a year.
NEWS
June 15, 2015 | By David O'Reilly, Inquirer Staff Writer
When he learned in April that Pope Francis was preparing an encyclical on climate change, Rabbi Arthur Waskow was "really inspired. " Then the white-bearded lion of progressive Judaism asked himself, "What next?" For more than three decades, Waskow, 82, has devoted himself and his Shalom Center in East Mount Airy to peace, civil rights, and the environment. That the leader of the Roman Catholic Church would speak out on what Waskow calls "global scorching" deserved, he decided, "a response from the Jewish community.
NEWS
June 15, 2015 | By David O'Reilly and Tom Avril, Inquirer Staff Writers
On the day he was elected pope, Cardinal Jorge Bergoglio of Argentina stood before a line of his fellow cardinals to receive their blessings. "Don't forget the poor," whispered his Brazilian friend, Cardinal Claudio Hummes, as the two embraced in the Sistine Chapel. And with that, Bergoglio knew the papal name he would choose. "Immediately I thought of St. Francis of Assisi," he later said. "A man of poverty, a man who loved and protected creation. " To the delight of many around the world - and the consternation of many others - Francis on Thursday will honor his namesake with an encyclical asserting that modern climate change is real, mostly man-made, and of compelling moral concern because global warming is an affliction wrought by wealthy nations with disproportionate impact on the poor.
NEWS
June 12, 2015
ISSUE | EARLY LEARNING Smart move We applaud Mayor Nutter and the leadership at Shared Prosperity Philadelphia for developing a plan to reduce poverty in the city based on helping all children capitalize on their potential ("Nutter, Kenney trumpet new push for early-childhood learning," June 3). We know what works. Abundant research has found that the preschool years are a critical time for brain development. Early learning efforts that focus not only on skill acquisition, but also on helping children develop positive beliefs about their own potential to succeed, have the power to change the trajectory of their lives.
NEWS
June 7, 2015 | By Julia Terruso, Inquirer Staff Writer
A Protestant bishop from Philadelphia will join clergy from around the country next week in a visit to the Vatican to meet with advisers to Pope Francis to discuss how the pope's message of inclusion applies to race relations in the United States. Bishop Dwayne Royster, head of Philadelphians Organized to Witness, Empower, and Rebuild (POWER), said the group wants to convey to the Vatican how low wages, criminalization, immigration, detention, and police brutality have hurt families in the U.S. "One of the things we're trying to say to the pope very clearly, and convey to his advisers, is, in the U.S., when you talk about any justice issue, race is at the center of it," Royster said.
NEWS
June 4, 2015
ISSUE | EARLY LEARNING Investments pay off sooner, and later I was happy to see Gov. Wolf and law enforcement officials make the anticrime case for quality, early-childhood education ("Wolf: Invest in preschool, not prison," May 27). Members of the business community see another critical benefit: strengthening our economy and workforce. Research highlighted by the national business-leader group ReadyNation shows that investing in these programs yields up to $26,000 in net long-term economic benefits for every child served.
NEWS
April 22, 2015 | By Erin Arvedlund, Inquirer Staff Writer
A 32-day student sit-in at Swarthmore College ended Monday after faculty voted to support the protesters' demands to divest endowment money out of fossil fuels. "We are ending after a commitment by the Board of Managers to engage us in the weeks leading up to their decision on divestment on May 1 and 2," said sophomore Stephen O'Hanlon, an organizer with Swarthmore Mountain Justice, the student group that has pushed for divestment for the last five years. An alumni petition with 1,100 signatures bolstered their demands.
NEWS
April 18, 2015 | By Sandy Bauers, For The Inquirer
For nearly two decades, Tyra Bryant-Stephens has worked to lessen the asthma crisis among children in Philadelphia neighborhoods where rates of the potentially deadly condition far outstrip the national average. In 1997, the physician at Children's Hospital of Philadelphia founded the Community Asthma Prevention Program, which she has led ever since. The staff of 12 includes nurses, educators, and lay home visitors. Bryant-Stephens also is active with the American Lung Association.
NEWS
March 30, 2015 | By Maddie Hanna, Inquirer Trenton Bureau
In Iowa this month, Gov. Christie bragged that he had "spent the last five years dismantling" what he called environmental protection "overreach. " The Republican governor's comment, made at an agricultural summit featuring other potential 2016 GOP candidates, reflected a policy of "balancing the need to pare back the onerous regulations and layers of red tape on businesses in New Jersey with a commitment to protect the environment," a Christie spokesman...
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