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Climate Change

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NEWS
April 16, 2004
In an April 4 letter ("Bush has already made climate change a priority issue"), Conrad Lautenbacher reveals the Bush administration's short-sighted views on both economic development and environmental safety. A recent conference sponsored by the Widener University School of Law ("Facing Climate Change: Tools and Opportunities for Pennsylvania"), called attention to success stories of U.S. companies and cities in reducing greenhouse gas emissions - and doing so profitably. In fact, many of the reductions went far beyond those called for by the Kyoto Protocol, which the Bush administration has failed to back.
NEWS
February 19, 2013 | By Sandy Bauers, Inquirer Staff Writer
More than 500 people from the region joined thousands of protesters Sunday in Washington, calling for strong action on climate change and a stop to the Keystone XL pipeline. The pipeline would transport oil from Canada to the Gulf Coast. Opponents say it would worsen climate change by encouraging further development of the tar-sands oil resource. They spent several hours in the bitter cold and a strong wind cheering, waving signs, listening to speakers, and marching around the White House, although President Obama was in Florida for a golf game.
NEWS
August 23, 2011 | By Jim Efstathiou Jr., Bloomberg News
Michael Mann, a Pennsylvania climate-change researcher caught in the flap surrounding e-mails hacked from a British university server, was cleared of wrongdoing by a U.S. agency that promotes science. Finding no "evidence of research misconduct," the Arlington, Va.-based National Science Foundation closed its inquiry into Mann, according to an Aug. 15 report from its inspector general. In February, Pennsylvania State University, where Mann is a professor of meteorology, exonerated him of suppressing or falsifying data, deleting e-mails, and misusing privileged information.
NEWS
September 10, 2009
By Denis O'Brien and Jan Jarrett National climate-change legislation passed by the House in June will come before the Senate this fall. The final bill, if wisely crafted, will save families money, significantly reduce our dependence on foreign oil, and create millions of well-paying American jobs, including a significant number of green jobs right here in Pennsylvania. Climate change poses a profound threat to our national security, the environment, and the global economy.
NEWS
April 25, 2009 | By Joseph Hannan INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
New Jersey State Museum officials want you to imagine walruses swimming along the state's coastline and wooly, gray musk oxen roaming the terrain. That might seem like science fiction, but it's actually a look at New Jersey more than 100,000 years ago. And while those creatures are gone, officials say learning about them can provide a valuable lesson to children and adults visiting the exhibit "Rising Tide: Climate Change and New Jersey. " Yesterday, fourth graders bustled about the exhibit, their excited cries echoing off the tile floors.
NEWS
December 7, 2008 | By John Shiffman and John Sullivan, Inquirer Staff Writers
WASHINGTON - On Dec. 5, 2007, EPA Administrator Stephen L. Johnson prepared to send the White House an extraordinary document. It declared that climate change imperiled the public welfare - a decision that would trigger the nation's first mandatory global-warming regulations. Johnson, a career scientist, knew that his draft would meet with resistance from antiregulatory ideologues at the White House, but he believed the science was solid. According to confidential records reviewed by The Inquirer, Johnson cited strong evidence: rises in sea level, extreme hot and cold days, ecosystem changes, melting glaciers, and more.
NEWS
June 24, 2009 | By Laurie Williams and Allan Zabel
We would support legislation in Congress to address climate change if it were capable of accomplishing that goal. Unfortunately, despite the best intentions of its proponents, the bill known as Waxman-Markey would disable our ability to reduce greenhouse-gas emissions for at least a decade, hugely increasing the risk of irreversible climate calamity. We are speaking as individuals based on our more than 20 years of experience as public-sector environmental-enforcement attorneys, including extensive experience in California with the sort of cap-and-trade program now being proposed in Washington.
NEWS
August 29, 2008 | Carlos Pascual and Strobe Talbott
Carlos Pascual and Strobe Talbott of the Brookings Institution The world may have only seven years to start reducing the annual buildup in greenhouse-gas emissions that otherwise threatens global catastrophe within several decades. That means that between Inauguration Day in January 2009 and 2015, either John McCain or Barack Obama will face the most momentous political challenge of all time. Reflecting a consensus of hundreds of scientists around the world, the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change has affirmed that greenhouse-gas emissions are raising the Earth's temperature.
NEWS
December 7, 2008 | By John Shiffman and John Sullivan INQUIRER STAFF WRITERS
On Dec. 5, 2007, EPA Administrator Stephen L. Johnson prepared to send the White House an extraordinary document. It declared that climate change imperiled the public welfare - a decision that would trigger the nation's first mandatory global-warming regulations. Johnson, a career scientist, knew that his draft would meet with resistance from antiregulatory ideologues at the White House, but he believed the science was solid. According to confidential records reviewed by The Inquirer, Johnson cited strong evidence: rises in sea level, extreme hot and cold days, ecosystem changes, melting glaciers, and more.
NEWS
August 23, 2010 | By Marshall Saunders
Legend has it that Nero fiddled while Rome burned. These days, Congress fiddles while the world burns. More precisely, it's Russia that's burning at the moment, with a record heat wave and forest fires being blamed for as many as 15,000 deaths so far. Also troubling is the drought, which prompted the Russian government to ban wheat exports this year, sending shock waves through global food markets. And as Russia burns, Pakistan drowns, with record rainfall producing floods that have affected 20 million people.
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NEWS
October 3, 2014
IN A SPEECH to the United Nations recently, President Obama said that climate change is a more serious threat than terrorism. So, why aren't more Americans terrified? A parade of panicked politicians talk about the Islamic militant group ISIS as if it were a combination of Hitler's Germany and Stalin's Soviet Union, faulting the president for not taking drastic action sooner. But climate change? What's the hurry? A majority of Americans (67 percent, in an August Pew/USA Today poll)
NEWS
September 29, 2014
ISSUE | NFL PROFITS Taxing league rule The National Football League holds a nonprofit designation from the IRS. Surprised? I certainly was. Since 1966, the NFL has not paid one wooden nickel in federal taxes. The NFL, demonstrably the most profitable of businesses, rides tax-free, and it is time that this gift to the 32 billionaire team owners be looked at for what it is: a raid on our pocketbooks. Fans buy the tickets that have made the owners billionaires, and then we are forced to pony up and bear their tax burden.
NEWS
September 19, 2014 | BY WILL BUNCH, Daily News Staff Writer bunchw@phillynews.com, 215-854-2957
IT WAS ONLY about three years ago Joanne Graham - longtime resident of working-class Eastwick, wedged between the overpasses of I-95 and the Cobbs Creek floodplain under the shadows of jumbo jets landing at Philadelphia International Airport - started to think seriously about the environment. The environment on her block, that is. The nonstop flooding in Graham's stretch of Eastwick, which is causing a corner of her home to slowly sink, turned the part-time consultant into a community activist.
NEWS
June 5, 2014 | BY WILL BUNCH, Daily News Staff Writer bunchw@phillynews.com, 215-854-2957
TOM STEYER, a politically active hedge-fund billionaire from San Francisco who calls global warming "the greatest moral crisis of our time," draws the sign of the cross on his left hand with a ballpoint pen every day. His right hand will soon be busy writing something else: large checks that he hopes will help elect Democrat Tom Wolf as the next governor of Pennsylvania. Political advisers say the progressive, unconventional retired financier has decided to invest a fortune - estimates range from $8 million to a whopping $15 million, depending on the closeness of the race - to block Gov. Corbett from a second term because he believes that the Republican "den[ies]
NEWS
May 28, 2014
Oldies but goodies Thanks to Wesley Stace for his fair and honest review of the Barry Gibb concert ("Barry Gibb, sole remaining Bee Gee, rocks Wells Fargo with brotherly love," May 21). It was pure joy for my husband and me to hear this music, as Gibb and his band delivered wonderful material highlighting Gibb's 50-year career. Too often, Inquirer reviewers seem favorable to younger performers, failing to give older, experienced musicians the credit they deserve. Denise Minger, Trevose Not tuning out Rumors of KYW's and the industry's demise are greatly exaggerated ("KYW ratings plunge," May 15)
NEWS
May 23, 2014
EVAN FRITZ, the head brewer at Manayunk Brewing Co., was smiling but looking kind of shell-shocked one afternoon this week. Around him lay twisted pipe, a disassembled boiler, stacks of muddy beer cans, a pile of electronic point-of-sale equipment. All ruined. "I keep joking that this storm didn't even have a name," he said. "What are we going to put on the plaque?" That would be the marker to show how high the waters from the May 1 flood rose. Irene in 2011 and Floyd in 1999 - the high-water marks from those devastating hurricanes are remembered with small signs behind the bar. This one, the storm with no name, came with no real warning.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 13, 2014 | By Ellen Gray
* INDEPENDENT LENS: LET THE FIRE BURN. 10 tonight, WHYY12   JASON OSDER was a fifth-grader living just outside Philadelphia on May 13, 1985, the day police firebombed the MOVE house on Osage Avenue in West Philadelphia, igniting a fire in which 11 people, including five children, died, and the surrounding neighborhood was destroyed. He never forgot. Now an assistant professor at George Washington University, Osder's first documentary, "Let the Fire Burn," winner of the best local feature award at last year's Philadelphia Film Festival, makes its TV debut tonight on PBS' "Independent Lens.
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