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Climate Change

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NEWS
April 16, 2004
In an April 4 letter ("Bush has already made climate change a priority issue"), Conrad Lautenbacher reveals the Bush administration's short-sighted views on both economic development and environmental safety. A recent conference sponsored by the Widener University School of Law ("Facing Climate Change: Tools and Opportunities for Pennsylvania"), called attention to success stories of U.S. companies and cities in reducing greenhouse gas emissions - and doing so profitably. In fact, many of the reductions went far beyond those called for by the Kyoto Protocol, which the Bush administration has failed to back.
NEWS
February 19, 2013 | By Sandy Bauers, Inquirer Staff Writer
More than 500 people from the region joined thousands of protesters Sunday in Washington, calling for strong action on climate change and a stop to the Keystone XL pipeline. The pipeline would transport oil from Canada to the Gulf Coast. Opponents say it would worsen climate change by encouraging further development of the tar-sands oil resource. They spent several hours in the bitter cold and a strong wind cheering, waving signs, listening to speakers, and marching around the White House, although President Obama was in Florida for a golf game.
NEWS
August 23, 2011 | By Jim Efstathiou Jr., Bloomberg News
Michael Mann, a Pennsylvania climate-change researcher caught in the flap surrounding e-mails hacked from a British university server, was cleared of wrongdoing by a U.S. agency that promotes science. Finding no "evidence of research misconduct," the Arlington, Va.-based National Science Foundation closed its inquiry into Mann, according to an Aug. 15 report from its inspector general. In February, Pennsylvania State University, where Mann is a professor of meteorology, exonerated him of suppressing or falsifying data, deleting e-mails, and misusing privileged information.
NEWS
December 7, 2008 | By John Shiffman and John Sullivan, Inquirer Staff Writers
WASHINGTON - On Dec. 5, 2007, EPA Administrator Stephen L. Johnson prepared to send the White House an extraordinary document. It declared that climate change imperiled the public welfare - a decision that would trigger the nation's first mandatory global-warming regulations. Johnson, a career scientist, knew that his draft would meet with resistance from antiregulatory ideologues at the White House, but he believed the science was solid. According to confidential records reviewed by The Inquirer, Johnson cited strong evidence: rises in sea level, extreme hot and cold days, ecosystem changes, melting glaciers, and more.
NEWS
September 10, 2009
By Denis O'Brien and Jan Jarrett National climate-change legislation passed by the House in June will come before the Senate this fall. The final bill, if wisely crafted, will save families money, significantly reduce our dependence on foreign oil, and create millions of well-paying American jobs, including a significant number of green jobs right here in Pennsylvania. Climate change poses a profound threat to our national security, the environment, and the global economy.
NEWS
April 25, 2009 | By Joseph Hannan INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
New Jersey State Museum officials want you to imagine walruses swimming along the state's coastline and wooly, gray musk oxen roaming the terrain. That might seem like science fiction, but it's actually a look at New Jersey more than 100,000 years ago. And while those creatures are gone, officials say learning about them can provide a valuable lesson to children and adults visiting the exhibit "Rising Tide: Climate Change and New Jersey. " Yesterday, fourth graders bustled about the exhibit, their excited cries echoing off the tile floors.
NEWS
June 24, 2009 | By Laurie Williams and Allan Zabel
We would support legislation in Congress to address climate change if it were capable of accomplishing that goal. Unfortunately, despite the best intentions of its proponents, the bill known as Waxman-Markey would disable our ability to reduce greenhouse-gas emissions for at least a decade, hugely increasing the risk of irreversible climate calamity. We are speaking as individuals based on our more than 20 years of experience as public-sector environmental-enforcement attorneys, including extensive experience in California with the sort of cap-and-trade program now being proposed in Washington.
NEWS
August 29, 2008 | Carlos Pascual and Strobe Talbott
Carlos Pascual and Strobe Talbott of the Brookings Institution The world may have only seven years to start reducing the annual buildup in greenhouse-gas emissions that otherwise threatens global catastrophe within several decades. That means that between Inauguration Day in January 2009 and 2015, either John McCain or Barack Obama will face the most momentous political challenge of all time. Reflecting a consensus of hundreds of scientists around the world, the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change has affirmed that greenhouse-gas emissions are raising the Earth's temperature.
NEWS
December 7, 2008 | By John Shiffman and John Sullivan INQUIRER STAFF WRITERS
On Dec. 5, 2007, EPA Administrator Stephen L. Johnson prepared to send the White House an extraordinary document. It declared that climate change imperiled the public welfare - a decision that would trigger the nation's first mandatory global-warming regulations. Johnson, a career scientist, knew that his draft would meet with resistance from antiregulatory ideologues at the White House, but he believed the science was solid. According to confidential records reviewed by The Inquirer, Johnson cited strong evidence: rises in sea level, extreme hot and cold days, ecosystem changes, melting glaciers, and more.
NEWS
April 17, 2014 | By Sandy Bauers, Inquirer Staff Writer
For Horsham sculptor Paula Winokur, a defining moment came when she was in a small boat in Alaska, viewing a glacier. Suddenly, the whole front of it calved off. "It was an overwhelming experience," she later recalled. For Philadelphia sculptor and furniture maker Peter Handler, an altered planet was more of a gradual realization. And when the recession brought about a slowing of commissions for his custom furniture, a friend suggested it was an opportunity to pursue what he wanted.
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NEWS
April 21, 2014
Get off the lawn While some big businesses and many Republicans delay action on climate change and focus on denial, this certainly isn't the case for all companies. Royal Dutch Shell, Unilever, and more than 60 others have put out a statement calling on all governments to fight climate change by limiting carbon dioxide pollution. These businesses recognize just how serious the problem will be, and they want government action. That's just the opposite of what the climate-denial pack wants.
NEWS
April 17, 2014 | By Sandy Bauers, Inquirer Staff Writer
For Horsham sculptor Paula Winokur, a defining moment came when she was in a small boat in Alaska, viewing a glacier. Suddenly, the whole front of it calved off. "It was an overwhelming experience," she later recalled. For Philadelphia sculptor and furniture maker Peter Handler, an altered planet was more of a gradual realization. And when the recession brought about a slowing of commissions for his custom furniture, a friend suggested it was an opportunity to pursue what he wanted.
NEWS
April 10, 2014 | By Sandy Bauers, Inquirer Staff Writer
  'Dear Sophie . . . " The man who is arguably the nation's best-known climate-change scientist was writing to his granddaughter. The letter was about monarch butterflies and a bullfrog, to be followed by others sounding environmental themes. James E. Hansen - "Bopa" to Sophie - wanted to teach her "how science works, how we investigate cause and effect," he said recently. Explaining it to her - in letters he plans to turn into a book called Sophie's Planet - "will help me put the climate story in a language that a broader audience can understand.
NEWS
March 30, 2014 | By Sandy Bauers, Inquirer Staff Writer
As 8:30 p.m. Saturday rolls into local time zones around the globe, iconic buildings and cultural sites, from Big Ben to the Eiffel Tower and the Parthenon, will go dark. For one hour - Earth Hour, as the event has been dubbed by its founder, the World Wildlife Fund - nonessential lighting will be turned off to draw attention to the threat of climate change, and to encourage action. In Philadelphia, the light strip across the Peco building will be turned off, said spokesman Ben Armstrong - right after the lights tout the company's Smart Ideas energy efficiency program.
NEWS
February 20, 2014 | By Andrew Seidman, Inquirer Trenton Bureau
U.S. Rep. Rush Holt, an astrophysicist and liberal Democrat now serving his eighth term in Congress, announced Tuesday that he would not seek reelection in November. He becomes the third member of New Jersey's congressional delegation to say he would either resign or retire from office by the end of 2014, joining U.S. Reps. Robert E. Andrews, a Democrat, and Jon Runyan, a Republican, both of South Jersey. On the other side of the Delaware, Republican Jim Gerlach of Chester County also is retiring.
NEWS
February 17, 2014 | By Anthony R. Wood, Inquirer Staff Writer
After last week's megastorm that solidified the legacy of the winter of 2013-14, one meteorologist confidently pronounced: "The back of winter is broken. " If that, indeed, is the case, those who have been shoveling the thousands of pounds of this stuff or have spent days without heat or lights likely would agree that winter is getting precisely what it deserves. "It's been a long, cold winter," said Bruce Terry, senior forecaster at the government's National Weather Center, in College Park, Md. "If you like snow, it's a bonanza.
NEWS
February 12, 2014 | by Sandy Bauers, Inquirer Staff Writer
In the high-stakes conflict over U.S. climate-change policy, groups that deny or cast doubt on global warming brought in $7.2 billion from 2003 through 2010 - less than a third of it publicly traceable to the donors. In a recently released study of 91 such organizations, a Drexel University professor found that $5.2 billion of their funding was "dark money" from undisclosed sources. Also of unknown origin: $78 million channeled by major benefactors through a special nonprofit that then redirected the money while keeping the givers' identities private.
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