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Climate Change

NEWS
September 21, 2013 | By Jonathan Lai, Inquirer Staff Writer
Hurricanes can flood homes, tear down boardwalks, make beaches disappear. They might also shape people's beliefs about climate change and their attitudes toward "green" policies, suggests new research from a Rutgers psychology professor. In a pair of studies by Laurie A. Rudman, a psychology professor at the New Brunswick campus, students were asked their opinions of climate change and asked whether they would vote for a fictional "green" politician over one who opposed policies such as raising fuel costs.
NEWS
August 23, 2013
A new White House report on rebuilding after Superstorm Sandy delivers the right message: that a true recovery must anticipate rising sea levels and other consequences of climate change. New Jersey can't preserve the unique character of its Shore communities and its $38 billion tourism industry without protecting the towns from the next extreme weather event. That means reinforcing buildings and strengthening infrastructure with the next storm in mind, not the last one. And not all structures can or should be rebuilt.
NEWS
August 21, 2013 | By Jacqueline L. Urgo, Inquirer Staff Writer
Coastal areas should prepare for rising sea levels and spend more now on protective measures as rebuilding continues along the New Jersey Shore following Hurricane Sandy, according to a presidential task force report released Monday. The report, created over the last six months by the federal Hurricane Sandy Rebuilding Task Force, recommended 69 policy initiatives and rebuilding strategies, including development of an electrical grid less likely to fail in a massive crisis. It also calls for better planning and standards for rebuilding in storm-damaged places in all regions, not just those directly affected when Sandy slammed into the East Coast on Oct. 29. The storm caused more than $38 billion in damage in New Jersey, mostly in the four counties on the ocean.
NEWS
August 2, 2013 | By Sandy Bauers, Inquirer Staff Writer
Considering everything from whether drivers honk more when it's hot (they do) to drought's role in the downfall of the Mayan empire, a team of researchers has concluded that violence - everything from wars to personal assaults - will increase as the world warms. Combining 60 previous studies that examined events back to 10,000 years ago, the researchers' statistical analysis found a jaw-dropping pattern - "more violence, whether we're talking domestic violence in India or murder in U.S. cities or civil war in Africa," said Edward Miguel, director of the Center for Effective Global Action at the University of California, Berkeley.
NEWS
August 1, 2013 | By Sean Carlin, Inquirer Staff Writer
WEST WINDSOR, N.J. - U.S. Senate candidate Rush Holt didn't waste time Tuesday night before taking a jab at his key Democratic rival. "Hi, my name is Rush Holt and I'm a candidate for the U.S. Senate, but enough about Cory Booker," the Democratic congressman said before a filled auditorium of more than 200 people at Mercer County Community College, at a town hall dubbed "Geek Out Live. " While Holt started by jabbing, he spent nearly two hours focusing on his effort to inject his ideals into the Senate.
NEWS
July 29, 2013 | By Sandy Bauers, Inquirer Staff Writer
One in a series of occasional articles about the regional effects of climate change and how we're coping.   Even though she'd been walking in the woods for only a few minutes, Jen McIntyre was in distress. Tears were running down her cheeks. She couldn't breathe through her nose. "I feel like this is our new reality," McIntyre said recently of the allergies that have begun to plague her. McIntyre, 43, of Mount Airy, never had allergies, aside from reactions to the odd dog or horse.
NEWS
July 9, 2013
By Kevin Shivers President Obama's recently announced climate-change agenda calls for stiff new limits on carbon emissions at coal-fired plants. That will hit Pennsylvania hard. A 2012 study by the Pennsylvania Coal Alliance found that 14,500 Pennsylvania jobs depend on coal, which contributes $7.5 billion to our state economy. Coal has actually reduced emissions 70 percent since the 1970s, and the cost of new regulations could devastate an already struggling industry. The climate-change proposal will also affect our state's small farms, restaurants, manufacturers, and even commercial offices, which will be deemed "stationary sources" of pollution.
NEWS
July 9, 2013 | By Charles Krauthammer
The economy stagnates. Syria burns. Scandals lap at his feet. China and Russia mock him, even as a "29-year-old hacker" revealed his nation's spy secrets to the world. How does President Obama respond? With a grandiloquent speech on climate change. Climate change? It lies at the very bottom of a list of Americans' concerns (last of 21 - Pew poll). Which means that Obama's declaration of unilateral American war on global warming, whatever the cost - and it will be heavy - is either highly visionary or hopelessly solipsistic.
NEWS
July 8, 2013 | By Alicia Chang and Seth Borenstein, Associated Press
LOS ANGELES - There's a dangerous but basic equation behind the killer Yarnell Hill wildfire and other blazes raging across the West this summer: More heat, more drought, more fuel, and more people in the way are adding up to increasingly ferocious fires. Scientists say a hotter planet will only increase the risk. More than two dozen wildland fires are burning from Alaska to New Mexico, fueled by triple-digit temperatures and arid conditions. In the Arizona mountain town of Yarnell, a blaze apparently sparked by lightning killed 19 members of an elite firefighting squad who had deployed their emergency shelters a week ago when erratic monsoon winds sent flames racing in their direction.
NEWS
July 7, 2013
Charting right course on climate President Obama's plan to set standards for coal-fired power plants is what Pennsylvania needs to reduce the most challenging changes expected due to increasing greenhouse gases. Expert studies predict the state will experience 100-degree-plus temperatures on 24 days a year by mid-century, up from just two now. With higher temperatures, we'll experience worse air pollution, pollen, and insect problems. Asthma among children, already high in Philadelphia, is likely to rise with the temperatures.
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