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NEWS
June 25, 2000 | By Doug Lansky, FOR THE INQUIRER
When I see a towering, snow-covered mountain peak, I don't get a deep-down, burning urge to climb it. Usually, I get a deep-down, burning urge to buy a postcard of it. Or, at least, a deep-down, burning urge to ski the part with chairlifts, then have a beer and nachos at the bottom. Unfortunately, Cotopaxi, the world's highest active volcano (19,460 feet), has no chairlifts or nacho stands. And for once, buying a postcard just didn't quite seem like enough. Perhaps it was the high altitude, or a brain infarction, but I decided to climb the thing.
NEWS
September 25, 2012 | By Binaj Gurubacharya, Associated Press
KATHMANDU, Nepal - Mountaineers who survived a pre-dawn avalanche high on the world's eighth-tallest peak say they waited an hour for the sun to come up and then saw pieces of tents and bodies of victims strewn around them on the snow. Italian climber Silvio Mondinelli said he and a fellow mountaineer were asleep when they heard a violent sound and felt their tent start to slide. "It was only a few seconds and we did not know what happened, but we had slid more than 200 meters [650 feet]
NEWS
October 7, 1999 | By Gwen Florio, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Alex Lowe climbed mountains so well, for so long, with such mythical bravery and strength, that in the tiny coterie of world-class climbers he was seen as eerily invulnerable. "Lungs with Legs," they called him, and "The Mutant," for his seemingly superhuman abilities. There was the perception, wrote Outside magazine, that Lowe "has tapped into some inexhaustible life force. " But Tuesday, in a suffocating thunderclap of ice and snow on one of the world's most challenging peaks, that force finally gave out. Lowe, 40, a onetime avalanche forecaster, and cameraman David Bridges of Aspen, Colo.
NEWS
July 13, 2012 | By John Heilprin and Angela Charlton, Associated Press
CHAMONIX, France - A climber trying to scale Mont Blanc may accidentally have caused a slab of ice to snap off Thursday high in the French Alps, sparking an avalanche that swept nine European climbers to their deaths, authorities said. A dozen climbers were injured, and two were still missing by nightfall. As a sheet of snow and ice thundered down the steep slope, several other climbers managed to turn away from the slide in time, regional authorities in Haute-Savoie said. Two climbers were rescued as emergency crews using dogs and helicopters scoured the churned-up, high-altitude area in a frantic search for the missing.
NEWS
April 24, 1997 | by Sally Siebert, For the Daily News
His face scarlet, Michael Levine groans and reaches for the rock at his fingertips. His friends stand nearby, coaching, encouraging and critiquing his "bouldering" technique up a narrow overhang. "That's it," Levine hollers, losing his footing and falling into a spongy bed of mulched tires. For Levine, a novice rock climber, falling isn't a big deal - as long as it happens in a gym. He is among a growing number of climbers who train at indoor rock gyms. For climbing enthusiasts of all levels, rock gyms provide a safe, climate-controlled environment to hone their skills.
NEWS
October 27, 1986 | By Sue Giller, Special to the Inquirer
Diary entry: 8 a.m. Oct. 13. I cautiously stick my head out of the sleeping bag, hoping to see sunlight on the tent. But all I see is dull gray, and all I hear is the monotonous rattle of snow on the tent fly. It will be another stormy day at Advance Base Camp - our sixth in a row. (Giller, 39, has four other major Himalayan expeditions to her credit, including Dhaulagiri, Annapurna and two previous trips to Everest. This marks her third visit to Everest, a record unmatched by any other woman climber.
NEWS
May 19, 2015 | By Samantha Melamed, Inquirer Staff Writer
Andrew Towne, 33, was eating lunch in a tent at base camp on Mount Everest when the ground beneath him began to sway. He and others scrambled out of the tent, said Towne, a new graduate of the University of Pennsylvania. That's when "we saw this wall of snow descending to the north. " The avalanche that followed would bury large areas of base camp, killing 19 climbers - just a fraction of the devastation in Nepal, where that magnitude-7.8 earthquake on April 25 and a second one on May 12 left more than 8,000 dead and 20,000 injured and destroyed 489,000 homes.
NEWS
June 4, 1996 | By Gwen Florio, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
"There are things in nature that engender an awful quiet in the heart of man; Devils Tower is one of them. " - N. Scott Momaday Thrusting 867 feet above the Black Hills with the abruptness of a fist through glass, Devils Tower consistently strikes awe in those who encounter it. How different groups react to that awe is at the heart of a dispute being played out in federal court in Casper, Wyo., where a judge is to rule this week in...
NEWS
July 13, 1997 | By Heather Moore, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Contrary to what the consumer world might suggest, safe climbing in Bucks County parks isn't about ropes that can hold the weight of two cars or expensive harnesses and pulleys or the right clothes and water bottle. It's about common sense. So argues veteran climber Michael Flood, the founder and president of the 450-member Ralph Stover Climber Coalition. "So many accidents I see happen because people expect that the rope is going to save them," he said. "The primary aspect of safety is being aware of where you are. Look before you leap.
NEWS
May 16, 1986 | By Murray Dubin, Inquirer Staff Writer (Inquirer wire services contributed to this article.)
Eight climbers - two of them alive - were found huddled in a snow cave on the slopes of Mount Hood yesterday after being lost for days in a "whiteout" blizzard, authorities said. Six of the climbers were declared dead at Portland area hospitals late last night. One of those still alive seemed likely to survive earlier today, while the other apparently fought more difficult odds. The storm already had claimed the lives of three companions whose bodies were found Wednesday. The eight missing climbers - six teenagers and two adults - were found in a cave they had fashioned from the snow about 100 feet from the spot where the three bodies were found Wednesday.
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NEWS
May 19, 2015 | By Samantha Melamed, Inquirer Staff Writer
Andrew Towne, 33, was eating lunch in a tent at base camp on Mount Everest when the ground beneath him began to sway. He and others scrambled out of the tent, said Towne, a new graduate of the University of Pennsylvania. That's when "we saw this wall of snow descending to the north. " The avalanche that followed would bury large areas of base camp, killing 19 climbers - just a fraction of the devastation in Nepal, where that magnitude-7.8 earthquake on April 25 and a second one on May 12 left more than 8,000 dead and 20,000 injured and destroyed 489,000 homes.
NEWS
November 4, 2014 | By Marcus Biddle, Inquirer Staff Writer
John B. "Jack" Hagner, 83, of Bala Cynwyd, a longtime public accountant, died Monday, Oct. 20, of dementia at Symphony Square Assisted Living & Memory Care. His wife of 27 years, Mary Ellen Yuhas Hagner, said Mr. Hagner started suffering memory loss in 2011 and was diagnosed with frontotemporal dementia. In 2013, he was admitted to Symphony Square. Mr. Hagner worked as a public accountant for 41 years at Ratke, Miller, Hagner & Co. in Philadelphia. It was formerly known as Hagner & Co. after his grandfather and father, who founded the company during the 1930s.
NEWS
March 24, 2014 | By Art Carey, For The Inquirer
In 2004, when Brady O'Mara set out to scale Mount Kilimanjaro, he read Seven Summits, a book about the adventures of businessman Dick Bass as he tried to become the first to summit the highest mountains on all seven continents. Despite an earlier ski accident that had shattered his left leg and seemed to spell the end of such feats, O'Mara reached the top of Kilimanjaro, the highest peak in Africa (19,341 feet). So exultant was he then that he hatched a new ambition: to follow in the footsteps of Bass.
NEWS
October 11, 2013 | BY GARY THOMPSON, Daily News Staff Writer thompsg@phillynews.com, 215-854-5992
"THE SUMMIT" uses reenactment and documentary footage to tell the story of an expedition that killed 11 mountaineers on K2 in August 2008. I found the approach a bit confusing, possibly in poor taste. Is that a real screaming climber hurtling into an abyss, or an actor? The basic facts are these: Twenty-two climbers from separate expeditions and several nations took advantage of a small weather window to make for the summit under perfect conditions. Perfect weather conditions, that is. The condition of the climbers' readiness was another matter.
NEWS
September 30, 2012 | By Rebecca Santana, Associated Press
ISLAMABAD, Pakistan - The use of drones in Pakistan normally brings to mind images of U.S. spy planes attacking tribal areas. But drones now are being used to capture a different kind of picture in the country - showing some of the world's highest mountains being scaled by world-class climbers through some of Earth's thinnest air. Drones, or remote-controlled aircraft, have long been the domain of the American military and are used extensively in...
NEWS
September 25, 2012 | By Binaj Gurubacharya, Associated Press
KATHMANDU, Nepal - Mountaineers who survived a pre-dawn avalanche high on the world's eighth-tallest peak say they waited an hour for the sun to come up and then saw pieces of tents and bodies of victims strewn around them on the snow. Italian climber Silvio Mondinelli said he and a fellow mountaineer were asleep when they heard a violent sound and felt their tent start to slide. "It was only a few seconds and we did not know what happened, but we had slid more than 200 meters [650 feet]
NEWS
September 24, 2012 | By Binaj Gurubacharya, Associated Press
KATHMANDU, Nepal - An avalanche hit climbers on a high Himalayan peak in Nepal on Sunday, leaving at least nine dead and six others missing, officials said. Many of the climbers were French or German. Police official Basanta Bahadur Kuwar said the bodies of a Nepalese guide and a German man were recovered and that rescue pilots had spotted seven other bodies on the slopes of Mount Manaslu in northern Nepal, the eighth highest mountain in the world. In Madrid, Spain's Foreign Ministry said one of those killed was Spanish, but did not release the person's identity.
NEWS
August 9, 2012 | By Kathy Boccella, Inquirer Staff Writer
With a father who is a neonatologist at Children's Hospital of Philadelphia, it isn't difficult to understand why Lauren Fox wants to go into medicine. But her father is also an adventurer who climbed the tallest mountains in Bolivia, first in the Peace Corps in the '60s and then with her two older brothers, so it was inevitable that the 17-year-old would one day follow in his crampon-print footsteps. That day came in June when Lauren Fox, 17, and her brother, James, 29, climbed Huayna Potosi in Bolivia's Cordillera Real, becoming, she believes, the second youngest woman - and youngest non-Bolivian female - to ascend the 20,000-foot peak near La Paz, a city surrounded by mountains.
NEWS
July 13, 2012 | By John Heilprin and Angela Charlton, Associated Press
CHAMONIX, France - A climber trying to scale Mont Blanc may accidentally have caused a slab of ice to snap off Thursday high in the French Alps, sparking an avalanche that swept nine European climbers to their deaths, authorities said. A dozen climbers were injured, and two were still missing by nightfall. As a sheet of snow and ice thundered down the steep slope, several other climbers managed to turn away from the slide in time, regional authorities in Haute-Savoie said. Two climbers were rescued as emergency crews using dogs and helicopters scoured the churned-up, high-altitude area in a frantic search for the missing.
NEWS
June 18, 2012
Hunt ended for Japanese climbers ANCHORAGE, Alaska - A shallow avalanche on Alaska's Mount McKinley may not have killed four Japanese climbers, but the slide pushed them into a crevasse more than 100 feet deep, the National Park Service said Sunday. Spokeswoman Kris Fister said Sunday that the search for the climbers was permanently suspended after a mountaineering ranger found the climbing rope in debris at the bottom of the crevasse. "We believe this is their final resting place," Fister said.
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