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Clinical Depression

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NEWS
June 4, 2010 | By Ronnie Polaneczky, Daily News Columnist
DAVE BLAUSER is back. The mail carrier from Holme Circle is exhausted, mentally fragile and has been undergoing intense medical evaluation since he called his wife, Denise, to say he was ready to come home. Readers will recall that Dave had gone missing on April 23, following a period of mental decline that culminated with the public revelation that he'd stashed 20,000 pieces of mail in his garage instead of delivering them. Denise asked me to write about Dave, an avid reader of this paper, to let him know she loved him, wasn't angry and wanted only for him to come home and get help.
NEWS
October 20, 1993 | By Carolyn Acker, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
People who suffer a clinical depression following a heart attack are three to four times more likely to die within six months than those who do not become depressed, Canadian researchers report. Their findings are published in today's Journal of the American Medical Association. An accompanying editorial says that both depression and social isolation have been demonstrated to increase the risk of death after a heart attack. "It would be unethical not to start trying to treat these factors," the editorial says.
NEWS
June 23, 1988 | Marc Schogol and includes reports from Modern Healthcare and Parents magazines and Inquirer wire services
DEPRESSED BOOMERS. The baby-boom generation is unhappy. Studies indicate that baby boomers are experiencing clinical depression - symptoms of which include appetite or sleep disturbance, feelings of worthlessness or inappropriate guilt, or thoughts of death - more often and at earlier ages than their parents did. Female boomers, for example, have a 65 percent greater chance than normal of being depressed at some time in their lives. Experts suspect that social changes and stress caused by high expectations' clashing with reality are factors.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 29, 2012 | By Harry Jackson Jr., ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH
ST. LOUIS - Caroll Marlow, 71, said she has been rescued from clinical depression by researchers at Washington University who want to help people older than 60. After more than 40 years of living with depression, she said, experiences and feelings that are routine for most other people are new for her. She goes to lunch to laugh with her sisters; she's closer to her children and friends. She dates her husband. And she found a job. "I love it; I work a swing shift and I just love it," she said.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 14, 2015 | By A.D. Amorosi, For The Inquirer
In October 1993, in the dusty, roiling streets of Mogadishu, Somalia, as photojournalist Paul Watson aimed his camera at the bloody, beaten corpse of a U.S. soldier, in his head he heard the man say, "If you do this, I will own you forever. " In 2007, poet and playwright Dan O'Brien heard Watson recount that memory in an NPR interview with Terry Gross on Fresh Air . Instantly, the soldier - and the photographer - owned O'Brien, as well. He and Watson began an e-mail correspondence that went on for several years, finally meeting (in the Arctic, of all places)
NEWS
February 7, 2006 | By WILLIAM C. KASHATUS
THROUGHOUT HISTORY, many leaders have struggled with depression but none as severely as Abraham Lincoln. Lincoln, whose birthday we celebrate on Sunday, wrestled with several demons during his presidency: a wife who was going insane, the death of a young son, a quarrelsome Cabinet and the constant anxieties of civil war. The toll those years took on him can be seen in the accompanying photos. But he was prepared to deal with each stress because of a life-long struggle with mental illness.
NEWS
February 17, 1998 | By Gloria A. Hoffner, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
The eighth-grade boy came to his regular junior high school counseling session and made a stunning announcement - he intended to end his life. He had a plan and a weapon, he told his school counselor, and was very serious. The boy received help and is now a high school junior, but similar incidents happen in schools every day, according to Sandra Harrar, a certified counselor of adolescents. "One young person [between 14 and 19 years old] kills themselves every one hour and 42.6 minutes," Harrar said.
SPORTS
August 18, 2014 | By Frank Fitzpatrick, Inquirer Columnist
A dark depression dogged Donnie Moore when, in 1989, the star-crossed reliever, recently released, put a bullet in his brain. Eighty-two years earlier, Chick Stahl, a .307 lifetime hitter in 10 big-league seasons, ingested a fatal dose of poison in his Indiana hotel room. And it was during a 1940 road trip to Boston when Cincinnati Reds catcher Willard Hershberger sliced his jugular with a razor. Locker rooms are, in many ways, fortresses. The sports sanctuaries are designed to insulate athletes from autograph-seekers, other fans and, for all but brief designated periods, the media.
NEWS
October 20, 2013 | By SaraKay Smullens, For The Inquirer
In The Inquirer and elsewhere, you may have read about the confusion and anger arising from the American Psychiatric Association's new fifth edition of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders. This 992-page tome, called the DSM-5, classifies mental illnesses, and will be used to make care availability and insurer funding decisions. For the first time in the manual's history, psychiatric researchers, not clinicians, dominated the proceedings. And the deciders did not include representatives from other mental health professions in their deliberations, even though most of these seeking care do not see psychiatrists.
SPORTS
April 17, 2013 | Daily News staff and wire reports
A SECOND complaint has been lodged against the Wisconsin-Green Bay men's basketball coach Brian Wardle , this one alleging verbal abuse and bullying. Gina Cougill , the mother of senior forward Brennan Cougill , wrote to university chancellor Thomas Harden last week, shortly after the parents of former center Ryan Bross filed the initial complaint against Wardle. Gina Cougill provided a copy of her letter to the Green Bay Press-Gazette . In it, she accused Wardle of minimizing her son's clinical depression as a "distraction," and said other players have been subjected to worse treatment.
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ENTERTAINMENT
January 14, 2015 | By A.D. Amorosi, For The Inquirer
In October 1993, in the dusty, roiling streets of Mogadishu, Somalia, as photojournalist Paul Watson aimed his camera at the bloody, beaten corpse of a U.S. soldier, in his head he heard the man say, "If you do this, I will own you forever. " In 2007, poet and playwright Dan O'Brien heard Watson recount that memory in an NPR interview with Terry Gross on Fresh Air . Instantly, the soldier - and the photographer - owned O'Brien, as well. He and Watson began an e-mail correspondence that went on for several years, finally meeting (in the Arctic, of all places)
SPORTS
August 18, 2014 | By Frank Fitzpatrick, Inquirer Columnist
A dark depression dogged Donnie Moore when, in 1989, the star-crossed reliever, recently released, put a bullet in his brain. Eighty-two years earlier, Chick Stahl, a .307 lifetime hitter in 10 big-league seasons, ingested a fatal dose of poison in his Indiana hotel room. And it was during a 1940 road trip to Boston when Cincinnati Reds catcher Willard Hershberger sliced his jugular with a razor. Locker rooms are, in many ways, fortresses. The sports sanctuaries are designed to insulate athletes from autograph-seekers, other fans and, for all but brief designated periods, the media.
NEWS
July 14, 2014 | By Stacey Burling, Inquirer Staff Writer
A type of therapy that combined training in emotional and physical coping skills helped patients who were facing blindness to avoid depression, a new study from Thomas Jefferson University has found. Patients with age-related macular degeneration who got the experimental treatment at home were half as likely to become depressed as those who simply talked with a therapist about their illness and its consequences. In the study, published last week in the journal Ophthalmology, 12.6 percent of patients who received a therapy called "behavior activation" became depressed, compared with 23.4 percent of the control group.
NEWS
December 2, 2013 | By Ilene Raymond Rush, For The Inquirer
Sending my son to college was not a frightening prospect. President of the National Honor Society in high school, a valued member of the tennis team, my son had a confidence I envied and an easy sociability I could only dream of. The only downside of his coolness was that it sometimes made it hard for me to relate to him: Subject to clinical depression and chronically insecure, I had been anything but cool and confident in high school and college....
NEWS
October 20, 2013 | By SaraKay Smullens, For The Inquirer
In The Inquirer and elsewhere, you may have read about the confusion and anger arising from the American Psychiatric Association's new fifth edition of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders. This 992-page tome, called the DSM-5, classifies mental illnesses, and will be used to make care availability and insurer funding decisions. For the first time in the manual's history, psychiatric researchers, not clinicians, dominated the proceedings. And the deciders did not include representatives from other mental health professions in their deliberations, even though most of these seeking care do not see psychiatrists.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 1, 2013
A LONE WOMAN stood in the middle of the Benjamin Franklin Bridge one frigid January day, looking down at the Delaware River. Something seemed off to a police officer bicycling past, so he followed the woman. But this wasn't some troubled soul looking for a quick way out. It was NBC10's Lu Ann Cahn. And although Cahn, then 53, was all too familiar with feelings of despair, she wasn't suicidal. In fact, she was outside on that cold afternoon because she had been in a funk and had come up with a clever way to get herself out of it: She would do something new every day during the year 2010.
SPORTS
April 17, 2013 | Daily News staff and wire reports
A SECOND complaint has been lodged against the Wisconsin-Green Bay men's basketball coach Brian Wardle , this one alleging verbal abuse and bullying. Gina Cougill , the mother of senior forward Brennan Cougill , wrote to university chancellor Thomas Harden last week, shortly after the parents of former center Ryan Bross filed the initial complaint against Wardle. Gina Cougill provided a copy of her letter to the Green Bay Press-Gazette . In it, she accused Wardle of minimizing her son's clinical depression as a "distraction," and said other players have been subjected to worse treatment.
NEWS
February 8, 2013 | By David Patrick Stearns, Inquirer Music Critic
Like a blue moon, Rossini's seldom-heard, difficult-to-assemble Petite Messe Solennelle will appear here twice in a single month. In a pure coincidence that could make high-tone jaws drop in any great music capital, the Mass will be sung by Choral Arts Philadelphia at 7 p.m. Saturday at St. Mark's Episcopal Church, then by the Philadelphia Singers chorus at 8 p.m. Feb. 18 at the Kimmel Center's Perelman Theater. "We could live another 100 years and never again hear this piece nine days apart," said Miles Cohen, artistic administrator for the Philadelphia Chamber Music Society, producer of the second concert.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 29, 2012 | By Harry Jackson Jr., ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH
ST. LOUIS - Caroll Marlow, 71, said she has been rescued from clinical depression by researchers at Washington University who want to help people older than 60. After more than 40 years of living with depression, she said, experiences and feelings that are routine for most other people are new for her. She goes to lunch to laugh with her sisters; she's closer to her children and friends. She dates her husband. And she found a job. "I love it; I work a swing shift and I just love it," she said.
NEWS
June 4, 2010 | By Ronnie Polaneczky, Daily News Columnist
DAVE BLAUSER is back. The mail carrier from Holme Circle is exhausted, mentally fragile and has been undergoing intense medical evaluation since he called his wife, Denise, to say he was ready to come home. Readers will recall that Dave had gone missing on April 23, following a period of mental decline that culminated with the public revelation that he'd stashed 20,000 pieces of mail in his garage instead of delivering them. Denise asked me to write about Dave, an avid reader of this paper, to let him know she loved him, wasn't angry and wanted only for him to come home and get help.
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