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Clinical Research

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NEWS
June 12, 2008 | By Jane M. Von Bergen, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Encorium Group Inc., a clinical research organization based in Wayne, will expand its global reach by combining with Fine Success Investments Ltd., a British Virgin Islands company doing business as Linkcon, Encorium said. Linkcon has acquired or is acquiring clinical research organizations in China, India and Latin America. Linkcon also holds a controlling interest in JK1, a health-care portal for medical professionals and consumers that links China and the western world. Encorium also announced that it is buying Prologue Research International Inc. for $13 million.
NEWS
August 29, 2005
After reading Chris Mondics' excellent article on the pharmaceutical hub in the Philadelphia area, I was surprised and disappointed to read the Aug. 23 editorial "Find the right remedy," which was so negative toward Merck, Vioxx and the Food and Drug Administration. Merck is the biggest component of our area's pharmaceutical hub and an important aspect of the local economy with its 12,000 well-paid employees. It still has a reputation for competence and integrity in research and development.
NEWS
September 2, 2009 | INQUIRER STAFF
Encorium Group Inc., which performs clinical research, has been warned that its stockholders' equity does not comply with Nasdaq listing requirements. The letter, which the Berwyn company received Aug. 25, said that, based on its 10-Q for the quarter ended June 30, it didn't have the $2.5 million stockholders' equity required for continued listing on Nasdaq's Capital Market. Encorium's 10-Q showed shareholders' equity at $1.8 million. The company, which specializes in designing and managing trials of new products for the pharmaceutical industry, said it intended to submit a compliance play by the Sept.
NEWS
August 17, 2010
Encorium Group Inc., a Wayne-based company that sold its U.S. assets a year ago, said Wednesday that it had a second-quarter net loss of $0.81 million, or 24 cents per share, compared with a loss of $1.94 million, or 76 cents per share for the same period a year ago. Total revenue for the three months ending June 30 was $4.39 million, compared with $5.28 million a year earlier, the company said. Encorium conducts clinical research for pharmaceutical and biotechnology companies around the world.
NEWS
November 4, 2000 | By Dominic Sama, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Francis B. O'Brien Jr., 74, a retired physician and researcher, died of lung failure Wednesday at Riddle Village, a retirement community in Middletown. He formerly lived in Newtown Square. Dr. O'Brien had maintained a private practice in obstetrics and gynecology for nearly 20 years early in his career. He had offices in Brooklyn, N.Y., his hometown, and on Long Island. In 1974, he closed his private practice and joined G. D. Searle & Co. in Skokie, Ill., as assistant director of clinical research in obstetrics and gynecology.
NEWS
November 9, 1998 | by Frank Dougherty, Daily News Staff Writer
The Fox Chase Cancer Center and Temple University will announce today an agreement that will expand their decade-old joint academic and clinical program to strengthen cancer care services in Greater Philadelphia. But both parties emphasized the expanded agreement, which will run through 2008, is designed to strengthen their affiliation, and isn't a merger. "This affiliation allows both institutions to draw on existing strengths and build new programs, while retaining our independence and separate identities," Fox Chase President Robert C. Young said.
NEWS
August 7, 2008 | By Damian Troise and Tom Murphy, ASSOCIATED PRESS
INDIANAPOLIS - Drug-development services company Covance Inc. will buy an Indiana research center from Eli Lilly and Co. and enter a 10-year service deal with the drugmaker worth $1.6 billion. New Jersey-based Covance will pay $50 million for Lilly's 450-acre drug development campus in Greenfield, Ind., while offering employment to about 260 Lilly employees. Lilly is headquartered in Indianapolis. Covance will use the site to provide mostly early-stage clinical trial work to Lilly as part of the 10-year contract.
NEWS
March 23, 2006 | By Arthur Caplan
Last week, six very healthy men suddenly wound up in a London hospital in critical condition. Earlier this month, 11 otherwise well people tested positive for tuberculosis, according to Montreal's health department. What do these people have in common? All were human subjects in research paid for and conducted by private companies. These problems mean that the time has come to take a closer look at how commercialized research involving human subjects is being conducted all over the world.
BUSINESS
April 1, 2011
The good news is that some pharmaceutical companies now disclose payments they make to doctors for speaking engagements or consulting and to researchers, hospitals, and other medical institutions for clinical studies. The bad news is that each company discloses the information differently. That will change as part of the overhaul of the nation's health insurance system, but we won't see the results of that until 2013. For now, we'll need to make do with nonstandard disclosures, such as those released by GlaxoSmithKline P.L.C.
NEWS
November 29, 1991 | By S. Joseph Hagenmayer, Special to The Inquirer
Dr. Lewis C. Mills Jr., 68, a vice president of health affairs at Hahnemann University Hospital in the 1980s and a staff member since 1957, died Wednesday at Hahnemann of non-Hodgkin's lymphoma. Dr. Lewis, an endocrinologist, served in a variety of positions at both the hospital and Hahnemann University during his 34 years there. He most recently was a consultant to the hospital, and from 1985 to 1988 was director of Alternative Health Care Delivery Systems. When he joined the hospital, he headed up the endocrinology and metabolism section.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
August 18, 2013 | By Susan Snyder, Inquirer Staff Writer
Carly Sokach didn't have much interest in research. For her, it was simply an obligatory requirement for her to apply to medical school. But that changed this summer when the University of Pennsylvania rising junior began working on research that inspired her: She studied whether a questionnaire could tell doctors if a patient with ulcerative colitis was in remission, rather than resorting to a colonoscopy, an invasive procedure. She spent much of her time talking to patients who had the disease.
NEWS
August 9, 2012 | By Don Sapatkin, Inquirer Staff Writer
Sprucing up vacant lots in a high-crime neighborhood may make people feel safer, researchers reported Tuesday - a seemingly obvious finding that nevertheless adds to a growing body of research showing how cheap and simple interventions may affect the health of a community. Researchers at the University of Pennsylvania Perelman School of Medicine announced last year that they had found a net reduction in crime in areas around more than 4,000 vacant lots that had been "greened" compared with others that were left alone over 10 years.
BUSINESS
April 16, 2012
Brian L. Strom has been appointed executive vice dean for institutional affairs at Penn Medicine. Strom is the founding chairman of the department of biostatistics and epidemiology and the founding director of the Center for Clinical Epidemiology and Biostatistics at Penn Medicine.   Jefferson Medical College of Thomas Jefferson University appointed David J. Whellan to the new position of assistant dean for clinical research. He will remain the director of the Jefferson Coordinating Center for Clinical Research.
NEWS
January 9, 2012
Drugs don't prevent herpes from being passed on A new study of genital herpes sufferers finds that while antiviral therapy reduces outbreaks of sores, it does not stop the virus from multiplying. That means the illness can still be passed on to a partner during sex. University of Washington researchers analyzed three previous studies involving 113 patients who took placebo pills or varying doses of antiviral drugs such as acyclovir. Even patients taking the highest doses had short periods when the herpes simplex-2 virus was multiplying, or "shedding," at rates too low to cause symptoms, but high enough to be transmitted.
BUSINESS
April 1, 2011
The good news is that some pharmaceutical companies now disclose payments they make to doctors for speaking engagements or consulting and to researchers, hospitals, and other medical institutions for clinical studies. The bad news is that each company discloses the information differently. That will change as part of the overhaul of the nation's health insurance system, but we won't see the results of that until 2013. For now, we'll need to make do with nonstandard disclosures, such as those released by GlaxoSmithKline P.L.C.
NEWS
August 17, 2010
Encorium Group Inc., a Wayne-based company that sold its U.S. assets a year ago, said Wednesday that it had a second-quarter net loss of $0.81 million, or 24 cents per share, compared with a loss of $1.94 million, or 76 cents per share for the same period a year ago. Total revenue for the three months ending June 30 was $4.39 million, compared with $5.28 million a year earlier, the company said. Encorium conducts clinical research for pharmaceutical and biotechnology companies around the world.
NEWS
September 2, 2009 | INQUIRER STAFF
Encorium Group Inc., which performs clinical research, has been warned that its stockholders' equity does not comply with Nasdaq listing requirements. The letter, which the Berwyn company received Aug. 25, said that, based on its 10-Q for the quarter ended June 30, it didn't have the $2.5 million stockholders' equity required for continued listing on Nasdaq's Capital Market. Encorium's 10-Q showed shareholders' equity at $1.8 million. The company, which specializes in designing and managing trials of new products for the pharmaceutical industry, said it intended to submit a compliance play by the Sept.
NEWS
April 23, 2009 | By MARIE MCCULLOUGH Inquirer Staff Writer
SOON AFTER Elizabeth Buell-Fleming was diagnosed at age 2 with a rare nerve-cell cancer, her parents and doctors discussed getting her into an experimental study. Not that proven treatments were unavailable; she would receive the latest, best care. The issue was how the toddler from Newark, Del., might play a small part in the discovery of even better therapies by being in a clinical trial. "We were told about clinical trials from the beginning" in 2006, said her father, Boyd Fleming.
NEWS
August 7, 2008 | By Damian Troise and Tom Murphy, ASSOCIATED PRESS
INDIANAPOLIS - Drug-development services company Covance Inc. will buy an Indiana research center from Eli Lilly and Co. and enter a 10-year service deal with the drugmaker worth $1.6 billion. New Jersey-based Covance will pay $50 million for Lilly's 450-acre drug development campus in Greenfield, Ind., while offering employment to about 260 Lilly employees. Lilly is headquartered in Indianapolis. Covance will use the site to provide mostly early-stage clinical trial work to Lilly as part of the 10-year contract.
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