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Closings

NEWS
October 31, 2014 | By Thomas Fitzgerald, Inquirer Politics Writer
Gov. Corbett is closing the gap. But the gap remains. The race for Pennsylvania governor has tightened a smidgen entering its final days, with Democrat Tom Wolf still enjoying a 13 percentage point lead over Corbett among likely voters, according to a Franklin and Marshall College Poll released Wednesday. That's down from a 22-point lead for Wolf in F&M's June poll. Among voters who said they were very interested in the race and certain to vote on Tuesday, Wolf had the support of 53 percent to 40 percent for the Republican governor, the new poll found.
NEWS
October 31, 2014 | By Martha Woodall, Inquirer Staff Writer
X'Aria Elliott had been hearing rumors for days that the Walter D. Palmer charter might close its high school program. But the senior was stunned nevertheless when she got a call from a friend Sunday night saying her school was shutting down immediately. "I didn't get a reality check until the next morning," said Elliott, 17. "I just wanted to cry. " Elliott, who enrolled at Palmer after being home-schooled in seventh and eighth grades, said her senior year had been ruined.
NEWS
October 30, 2014 | By Suzette Parmley, Inquirer Staff Writer
The collapse of New Jersey's hospitality industry, driven by the closure this year of four casinos in Atlantic City, is one reason the state's economy is not faring as well as the nation's, an economist said Tuesday at a business forum. "It's really a tale of two economies - the national economy vs. the state economy," said Joel Naroff of Naroff Economic Advisors Inc. in Bucks County. "If I had to give the state economy a grade, maybe I'd give it a 60 out of 100. It's not doing too well.
NEWS
October 30, 2014 | By Martha Woodall, Inquirer Staff Writer
      X'Aria Elliott had been hearing rumors for days that the Walter D. Palmer charter might close its high school program.       But the senior was stunned nevertheless when she got a call from a friend Sunday night saying her school was shutting down immediately.       "I didn't get a reality check until the next morning," said Elliott, 17. "I just wanted to cry. "       Elliott, who enrolled at Palmer after being home-schooled in seventh and eighth grades, said her senior year had been ruined.
SPORTS
October 29, 2014
THE FIFTH season of Philadelphia Union soccer concluded yesterday, another stoppage-time goal allowed signifying the end of a 10-12-12 campaign. A tap-in by Columbus midfielder Bernardo Anor negated a late equalizer and sent the visiting Union out with a 2-1 defeat at Crew Stadium. The Philly club finished the season with 42 points, four fewer than last year and five fewer than the fifth-place New York Red Bulls, in missing the postseason for the fourth time in 5 years. For most of its season finale, the Union played from behind, Jairo Arrieta's 13th-minute goal marking the game's lone score for more than 80 minutes of play.
NEWS
October 28, 2014 | By Martha Woodall, Inquirer Staff Writer
The embattled Walter D. Palmer Leadership Learning Partners Charter School is closing its high school two months into the academic year. The move affects 286 students in ninth through 12th grades at the charter's secondary campus in Frankford. In an e-mail sent to staff Sunday, the school's chief administrative officer said the students would be welcome to transfer to West Philadelphia High School. A parents' meeting was scheduled for 6 p.m. Monday to explain that transfer process, as well as other options for students at district, charter, cyber and Catholic schools.
NEWS
October 18, 2014 | By Amy Worden, Inquirer Harrisburg Bureau
HARRISBURG - The state Senate closed out its 2013-14 session by passing more than a dozen pieces of legislation, many of them crime-related, including bills covering local gun ordinances, domestic violence, and animal cruelty. Most of the bills approved Thursday are headed for Gov. Corbett's desk, but others must receive final votes in the House, which returns for its last voting day Monday. Among the most controversial pieces of legislation moved by the Senate was a measure to give legal standing to "membership organizations," including the National Rifle Association, to sue municipalities if they enact gun laws stricter than state law. Philadelphia is one of 30 municipalities that have enacted ordinances mandating the reporting of lost and stolen weapons over the last several years since efforts failed to win passage of state gun-control laws.
NEWS
October 18, 2014 | By Dylan Purcell and Mark Fazlollah, Inquirer Staff Writers
The Pennsylvania Senate unanimously passed legislation Thursday to close a loophole that for years has let repeat drunken drivers legally stay behind the wheel. The Pennsylvania District Attorneys Association applauded the passage. "It is always gratifying when the legislature comes together on a bipartisan basis and takes steps to protect the public, and that is exactly what happened here," said Greg Rowe, the association's legislative liaison. Gov. Corbett's office said he would sign the bill.
NEWS
October 13, 2014 | By Amy S. Rosenberg, Inquirer Staff Writer
ATLANTIC CITY - It was a more optimistic time 11 years ago when David Welsh, a city tree trimmer in search of a house, heard of one about to go on the market and raced over to make an offer. After haggling, Welsh was able to buy the 1925 two-story house just over the Albany Avenue Bridge in Chelsea Heights for $190,000. Now, two years after Hurricane Sandy dumped four feet of water into his carefully furnished house, Welsh, 58, and girlfriend Francine Tiemann, 64, are finally past the trauma of the contractor who left them in the lurch after blowing through $62,000 worth of insurance payments and past the Hail Mary help from the Atlantic City Long Term Recovery Group, which finished the bulk of the rebuilding.
BUSINESS
October 11, 2014 | By Harold Brubaker, Inquirer Staff Writer
The St. Peter Claver Center for Evangelization in Center City, which has served black Catholics for nearly 30 years, will close at the end of this month, the Archdiocese of Philadelphia announced. The center, housed in the former St. Peter Claver Roman Catholic Church at 12th and Lombard Streets, a historically black parish, was originally slated to close two years ago amid major archdiocesan cutbacks, including the layoff of a quarter of the staff at headquarters. But the archdiocese's Office for Black Catholics, part of the Secretariat for Evangelization, appealed the decision, and the center was given a reprieve because grants from outside the archdiocese were supporting its programs.
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