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NEWS
August 7, 2015 | By David O'Reilly and Michael Boren, Inquirer Staff Writers
The most massive planned event in Philadelphia history - Pope Francis' two-day visit in September - demands unprecedented and sweeping measures to control crowds, traffic, and transit, Mayor Nutter announced Wednesday. The Benjamin Franklin Bridge will be closed to vehicles for 21/2 days, along with lengthy sections of the Schuylkill Expressway, the entire Vine Street Expressway, and part of Route 1. I-95 will remain open, contrary to weeks of speculation. Three lanes of the bridge will be open to pedestrians moving between New Jersey and Philadelphia, officials said.
NEWS
August 2, 2015 | By Joseph A. Slobodzian, Inquirer Staff Writer
The Philadelphia murder trial of Thomas Coffee - accused of using a Craigslist ad to lure a South Jersey man into an armed robbery - could go to the jury Monday after the defense completed its case and prosecutors presented rebuttal testimony Friday. Defense attorney Evan T.L. Hughes' witnesses included Coffee's sister, Shanise Palmer, who said Coffee was at home in Willow Grove around 11 p.m. on June 21, 2013 - the time when Daniel Cook, 27, of Williamstown, Gloucester County, was shot to death in West Oak Lane.
NEWS
August 1, 2015 | By Julia Terruso, Inquirer Staff Writer
The U.S. Secret Service said Thursday that the agency - which is heading security for the visit of Pope Francis in September - has not ordered Philadelphia businesses to close and did not dictate that SEPTA limit rail service that weekend. The agency instead stressed that Philadelphia would be "open for business" when the pope visits. Meanwhile, South Jersey sources confirmed that the Benjamin Franklin Bridge will be closed, and some universities in the area outlined plans to shut down that weekend.
NEWS
July 31, 2015 | By Jan Hefler, Inquirer Staff Writer
A financial broker who is serving time in federal prison in connection with a $2 million mortgage scheme took the stand Wednesday in the conspiracy trial of ex-Eagle Irving Fryar and his mother, Allene McGhee, in the Burlington County Courthouse in Mount Holly. William Barksdale is the key witness in a high-profile case in which the state Attorney General's Office alleges Fryar and McGhee conspired to defraud six banks and a mortgage company of more than $1 million in 2009. Barksdale, of Levittown, had pleaded guilty to conspiracy to commit wire fraud for assisting Fryar, McGhee, and several other Burlington County clients with the scheme.
NEWS
July 29, 2015 | By Jonathan Lai, Inquirer Staff Writer
The community college in New Jersey's largest county is shifting its operations around among its physical campuses, closing its longtime Pemberton home and expanding its Mount Laurel campus to reflect enrollment and population changes over the years. The announcement Monday from Rowan College at Burlington County - newly renamed from Burlington County College, reflecting a partnership with Rowan University - follows an internal study showing the school's Mount Laurel campus has high demand, while its Pemberton location does not. It also follows a simple reality: The Mount Laurel campus has already been the de facto main campus for a decade, and future growth for the 9,500-student college was always likely to occur more on that campus than in other locations.
SPORTS
July 26, 2015 | BY RYAN LAWRENCE, Daily News Staff Writer rlawrence@phillynews.com
CHICAGO - The trade deadline can make people a little nutty, including overheated sports writers, so Chicago Cubs manager Joe Maddon wore a catcher's mask to his pregame news conference yesterday afternoon at Wrigley Field. "I heard things got a little testy today," Maddon said. That might also be the best adjective to describe the feelings of Cole Hamels (and Jonathan Papelbon) if they're still on the Phillies roster a week from today. The trade deadline (finally) arrives at 4 p.m. Friday.
BUSINESS
July 25, 2015 | By Suzette Parmley, Inquirer Staff Writer
The first 20 of 175 Gap stores picked to close throughout North America will shut their doors for good on Sunday, including two in upstate Pennsylvania and one in North Jersey. The closures are a sign of how far Gap has tumbled. Long a retail innovator, Gap has seen competitors adopt its quick-to-market strategies and has been getting gored by online competition. Another sign of its decline: Last quarter, the Gap division posted just more than half the U.S. sales of its Old Navy division, which has been doing better and is not seeing any closures.
NEWS
July 24, 2015 | BY VINNY VELLA, Daily News Staff Writer vellav@phillynews.com, 215-854-2513
IT WAS ALMOST by accident that Tyshawn Toney reconnected with Jasmine Wright, an old friend from Penn State University. A few weeks ago, a photo of her at Drexel University popped up on his Facebook. Toney, who works at Children's Hospital of Philadelphia, had no idea that Wright was in Philly completing her master's in public health. Toney, 31, laughed last night as he recalled their first meeting in a late-night visit to a Sheetz convenience store in State College. "She was always the quiet one," Toney said as dusk fell at Drexel Park, on Baring Street near 32nd in Powelton, where about 10 of Wright's friends gathered to honor her memory.
NEWS
July 23, 2015 | By Joseph A. Slobodzian, Inquirer Staff Writer
The criminal conflict-of-interest trial of former Philadelphia Common Pleas Court Judge Willis W. Berry Jr. will likely go to the jury Wednesday after a full day of testimony in which a state prosecutor ended his case and Berry's lawyers began their defense. Berry, 72, ended Tuesday's session outside the presence of the jury of six men and six women, telling a specially assigned outside judge, Montgomery County Senior Judge S. Gerald Corso, that he would not testify in his defense. "I've decided to follow the advice of my counsel and not testify," Berry said.
NEWS
July 21, 2015
PHILADELPHIA'S future is dependent on the future of its children. Most parents know that. And most parents - rich, poor and middle-class - want a better life for their children. They also know, in their gut, that the path to that better life is an education. There is a vast aspiring class of parents in this city who spend an enormous amount of time and effort seeking a good education for their kids. They join the admissions lottery at charter schools. They sometimes move to be in the catchment area of a good public school.
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