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NEWS
May 10, 2001 | By Patricia McLaughlin FOR THE INQUIRER
As you may know, the stock market hasn't been a fun place to be lately. Dot-coms collapsing left and right. Aggressive growth stock funds aggressively shrinking. Retail stocks in sad straits. So isn't it interesting that the stock of J. Jill Group went up by 275 percent last year? Who'd have thought a catalog retailer that sells grown-up clothes to middle-aged women could hit such a hot streak? Even a few years ago, fashion pundits were still assuming that the only way to succeed in retail was to target zippy young things who kept changing their minds about whether they wanted to look more like Britney Spears or Madonna or Lil' Kim or Julia Roberts.
NEWS
September 22, 1991 | By Bryon Kurzenabe, Special to The Inquirer
Cloaked in a move to require uniforms at Willingboro's Twin Hills Elementary School is an attempt to make the kids who wear them better students. Parents hope that visual parity will allow children to worry less about attire and more about attitude. They hope that uniforms will foster an egalitarian environment in which children will walk prouder, have higher self- esteem and exhibit scholarly behavior. If items such as $100 sneakers and designer jeans are eliminated, they hope, children will focus more on their studies.
LIVING
May 18, 1986 | By Jill Gerston, Inquirer Staff Writer
In fall-fashion annals, 1986 may well be remembered as "The Year of the Gray Cashmere Dress. " This single creation best sums up the current mood pervading both the New York and European collections: quiet, understated, luxurious clothes that are more establishment than avant-garde. Everything is soft and tranquil (lush fabrics like cashmere and alpaca); dark, soothing colors (charcoal gray, black, creamy neutrals, brown), and easy, graceful silhouettes with well-defined waistlines and long, calf- grazing skirts.
NEWS
January 12, 1991 | By Dave Racher, Daily News Staff Writer
The burglar came clean in court after realizing the prosecutor's case against him was in the bag. Plastic bags, that is. Assistant District Attorney Mark Gilson said Jeffrey Burns, 29, of 51st Street near Springfield Avenue, was arrested at 5:55 a.m., on Jan. 6, 1990, while trying to steal bags of clothing from a dry cleaners at 50th Street and Warrington Avenue. Burns pleaded guilty and was sentenced yesterday to two to 20 years in prison by Common Pleas Judge Jane Cutler Greenspan.
NEWS
February 15, 1995 | by Rose DeWolf, Daily News Staff Writer
Most men don't give their old clothes away. A man will wear a flannel shirt until it is threadbare - or even longer. This is frustrating to organizations that collect and distribute second-hand clothes, the only wardrobe source for most poor and homeless people. "We get tons of women's clothes, particularly in mid-range sizes," sighs Janet Bernstein of Frankford Group Ministry, "because women will clear out their closets four times a year. "But we rarely get donations from men," she says, "because men's clothes don't go out of fashion the way women's do and because men don't seem to care if their clothes are out of fashion.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 26, 1986 | Jill Gerston, Inquirer Staff Writer
Women in the market for elegant, luxurious clothes - the sort that go nicely with diamonds and sables - need only do two-stop shopping this fall: at the salons of Valentino and Emanuel Ungaro. The two designers, who between them clothe just about all of the socialites, film stars and royals in Europe, don't skimp when it comes to designing sleek, dressy daywear and glamorous, entrance-making evening gowns. "These are rich-lady clothes, and they look it," commented Dawn Mello, president of Bergdorf Goodman, after Valentino's big, beautiful show Monday night.
NEWS
November 10, 1999 | by Leon Taylor, Daily News Staff Writer
District Attorney Lynne Abraham yesterday told a modern-day tale of rags to riches. The riches were said to have been garnered by eight suspects who allegedly ran a multimillion-dollar counterfeit clothing manufacturing ring in Philadelphia. The rags - cheap forgeries of top-name designer clothes and professional sportswear - were deep-discounted to customers for at least four years before cops shut down the estimated $2 million-a-year operation this summer. Standing near several tables covered with counterfeit Calvins, knock-off Nikes and fake FUBUs, Abraham announced the arrests that resulted from a lengthy joint probe by police and her office.
NEWS
November 21, 1989 | By Robin Clark, Inquirer Staff Writer
Prompted by the pleas of a concerned neighbor, relief workers brought warm clothes and the promise of company yesterday to a mentally ill Kensington man who lives alone with his demons in a dark, unheated rowhouse. Stephen Ferry, an outreach coordinator with the Community Organization for Mental Health and Mental Retardation, visited the man's home yesterday morning and returned later to deliver four second-hand sweaters, three pairs of pants and some socks. "Now we'll work on getting you some new shoes, Bill," Ferry said, pointing to the man's weatherbeaten feet, which were stuffed loosely inside two old dress shoes, one black and one brown, neither with laces.
NEWS
December 24, 1986 | By Patricia Quigley, Special to The Inquirer
The men's department was empty. No one was testing the perfume neatly arranged on the counters in the middle of the store. And all the appliances on the lower level remained untouched Thursday at J.C. Penney's in Audubon. But on the second floor, in the boys' and girls' departments, Gloucester County kids in all shapes and sizes held onto the hands of adults they had just met while the youngsters pulled clothes off the shelves and racks in search of the warmest gloves, the frilliest dresses and the perfect pairs of pants.
NEWS
August 15, 2002 | By Valerie Reed INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
NGA, a community-service organization based in Warminster, is collecting new clothes and backpacks for students in need. NGA, with three branches in Bucks County and five in Montgomery County, distributes donated items to school districts several times a year. Kristin Beggs, assistant administrator for NGA, said that new clothes at the start of the school year can help improve students' self-esteem. "If kids can fit in with their peers, they're more likely to go to school," she said.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
May 8, 2015 | BY JEROME MAIDA, For the Daily News
DANNY TREJO may be best known for playing the lead in the "Machete" film franchise, but he has had a long and memorable career. "I've worked with Steven Seagal, Robert De Niro, Jessica Alba, Michelle Rodriguez, Amber Heard, Amber Heard and - oh, yeah - Amber Heard," Trejo said, with a laugh. Trejo has made a career out of playing hyper-masculine, tough characters at a time when many complain that Hollywood's leading men have gotten soft. "I like the way Robert Rodriguez works," Trejo says of the director he has worked with on numerous films.
NEWS
April 17, 2015 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writer
Alex Niles, 32, formerly of Yardley, a businessman who created clothing designed to provide comfort for cancer patients during treatment, died Wednesday, April 8, of gastric cancer at his mother's home in the Forest Hills section of New York City. Mr. Niles founded CureWear, a nonprofit that made clothing with a flap so an intravenous line could be hooked up to a medical port without requiring the wearer to undress. His own health crisis inspired Mr. Niles to make treatment "a little more comfortable for the chronically ill," his family said in a statement.
NEWS
March 17, 2015 | BY DAN GERINGER, Daily News Staff Writer geringd@phillynews.com, 215-854-5961
JOHNZEE TOOK A break from the breakneck pace of the JFCS Thrift Boutique's back room and said that he and Robin Michaelson are pioneers, which is true. "Me and Robin are like the founders of this program," said JohnZee, 64, who prefers to use his email name. "JFCS does so much for people with special needs. " Michaelson, 46, nodded. In 2013, when Jewish Family & Children's Services opened the JFCS Thrift Boutique on Frankford Avenue near Tolbut Street in Pennypack Woods, its goal was to offer low-income residents donated clothing, housewares and toys for pennies on the dollar.
NEWS
February 17, 2015 | By Tricia L. Nadolny, Inquirer Staff Writer
The clothing donation bin appeared on the North Philadelphia street corner without warning, a metal box caked with bubble-gum pink paint and rust. Stenciled on the side in small blue letters was this message: "Through your donations we provide money to charities & give employees occupation. " Jay Butler, who owns the adjacent property near Erie Avenue and 21st Street, didn't think much of it. Until the bin filled up, and clothing - along with a mattress, a broken television, and an empty bottle of brandy - littered the sidewalk.
NEWS
January 5, 2015 | BY DAN GERINGER, Daily News Staff Writer geringd@phillynews.com, 215-854-5961
BRIAN LINTON, 28, proudly calls himself the founder and chief trash collector of United By Blue, his eco-friendly cafe/clothing/cool-stuff business on 2nd Street near Quarry in Old City. Linton promises that every time he sells one of his sustainable-material outdoorsy goods - a shirt, a backpack, an ax - in the store or online, he removes a pound of garbage from a body of water through company-organized cleanups. Linton said that since he founded United By Blue in 2010, he's removed 203,510 pounds of trash during 116 cleanups of vulnerable sites, including Bartram's Garden, Penn Treaty Park, the Schuylkill and Delaware rivers, and down the Shore.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 25, 2014 | By A.D. Amorosi, For The Inquirer
Rapper/producer Tyler, the Creator, who played Monday night to a sold-out crowd at the TLA, is a goofball. On solo efforts away from the Odd Future hip-hop collective (whose other star is singer Frank Ocean), such as the albums Bastard and Goblin and the mix-tape Wolf , Tyler indulges in everything from hilariously, hypersexualized vampire and automobile fantasies to scabrous riffs on homophobia, rape, and misogyny that he swears are just jokes. He named his clothing line after a spoonerism for the Odd Future alter-ego Wolf Gang.
NEWS
December 12, 2014
D REXEL SENIORS Ashley Revay, 21, of Center City, and Erin Moffitt, 21, of Fairmount, co-founded Chakra Fitwear, which designs and manufactures women's yoga pants from recycled plastic bottles. The e-commerce business is in the midst of an $80,000 Kickstarter campaign and has raised more than $8,200. I spoke with Revay. Q: How'd you come up with the idea for Chakra Fitwear? A: I knew Erin wanted to start a fitnesswear line and I came to her and said, "Why don't we incorporate our ideas with more of a sustainability background?"
ENTERTAINMENT
December 4, 2014
SORRY, you've been lied to. Forty is not the new 30, and there is no surgery, cream, magic elixir, age-proofing diet or fountain of youth. Exercise, I'm afraid, is not a cure-all. In our youth-obsessed culture, we resist the inevitability of change. Even worse, we want guarantees that if we eat the "right diet" and do the "right exercises" we will not only bypass aging and avoid diseases, we will ultimately cheat death itself. A few weeks ago I overheard a conversation between two women who were grappling with the sudden death of a dear friend.
NEWS
November 6, 2014 | By Laura McCrystal and Ben Finley, Inquirer Staff Writers
Pages of prayers. Computer equipment. Toilet paper. Soy sauce. Korean liquor. Laundry detergent. Those were among the supplies investigators say they found in the abandoned airplane hangar next to the Tannersville, Pa., field where Eric Frein was captured last week. The long list of items was made public Wednesday in a search warrant filed in Monroe County Court. Neither document nor investigators said Frein used the items or put them into the building. But the list appears to offer insight into how the alleged killer of a state trooper survived and evaded police for 48 days in the Poconos.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 28, 2014 | By A.D. Amorosi, For The Inquirer
He has none of his own, but it was kids who led Broadway legend Harvey Fierstein to write the book for the 2012 musical Newsies , which launches its national tour Tuesday at the Academy of Music as part of the Kimmel Center's Broadway Philadelphia series. Fierstein didn't love the 1992 Disney movie, which failed at the box office, but it seemed that children, specifically, his brother's, did. So he used the saga of the 1899 strike by New York City's spunky, exploited newsboys ("terrible as it was")
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