CollectionsClothes Dryer
IN THE NEWS

Clothes Dryer

FEATURED ARTICLES
LIVING
June 26, 2009 | By Alan J. Heavens INQUIRER REAL ESTATE WRITER
I need to feed you a line - a clothesline, in this case, which, without fear of contradiction, remains the most energy-efficient way of drying laundry. The humble clothesline is, however, not the best way of doing it. Sheets can freeze as stiff as boards even on the sunniest of winter days. It can rain at a moment's notice. Birds . . . well . . . birds can leave a clean shirt in need of fresh laundering in the blink of an eye. One more thing: Energy-efficient doesn't mean quick, and the clothesline is not a surefire cure to discovering Johnny's soccer uniform is still dirty a couple of hours before today's game and needs a wash and dry. So, the easiest way to get your clothes dry is with an electric or gas dryer.
NEWS
April 23, 1994 | For The Inquirer / MARTY O'GRADY
A fire at Garden State Race Track left three employees needing treatment for smoke inhalation yesterday, including track fire marshal Ann Romond (center). Cherry Hill fire officials said a clothes dryer near the sixth- floor kitchen of the Phoenix Room restaurant overheated as a result of lint buildup. The restaurant reopened about an hour later. Checking Romond is emergency medical technician Brenda Rosser (left).
NEWS
January 5, 2001 | By Richard V. Sabatini, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
For 15 years, volunteer firefighter Chris Russell has battled blazes and helped fire victims recover after their losses. Yesterday, Russell, his wife and three children lost everything when fire swept through the Fairless Hills ranch home they had been renting. The 7:41 a.m. blaze was blamed on a clothes dryer in the rear room of the first floor, Falls Fire Marshal Ed Copper said. "Just what occurred, we don't know yet. But it definitely was caused by the dryer, which had been running," Copper said.
NEWS
October 19, 1988 | By Jerry W. Byrd, Inquirer Staff Writer
The FBI and local police are continuing to investigate the case of a 5- year-old Chester County girl who disappeared from an East Vincent Township apartment complex Oct. 4. State police have circulated fliers describing the girl, Lauren Jackson, and the FBI said yesterday that agents were working to determine whether she had been kidnapped. "Right now, we don't have any evidence to show one way or the other," said FBI spokesman John Kundts. The child was last seen playing outside Park Spring Apartments, about eight miles southeast of Pottstown, where she lived with her mother, Christine O'Donnell.
NEWS
March 25, 1993 | by Joe Clark, Daily News Staff Writer
It's a menagerie unlike any other. A parrot that barks, a crow that wheezes, a skunk that can't walk straight, an owl that can't fly, and duck that can't mate. Then there's Benny. He's a cockatoo that gets his kicks by tearing knobs off the clothes dryer. He also meows. There's even a little yellow rubber ducky. Honest. A unique collection to be sure. You could call it a menagerie of misfits. Only they don't know it. Neither do the hundreds of thousands of children who are enchanted, entertained and, most importantly, educated by these characters and others like them every year.
NEWS
January 13, 2005 | By Marcianne Waters
I went grocery shopping today for the bazillionth time since that magical day when I became, as even the IRS terms it, "head of household. " It was the usual - skim milk, designer eggs, and that toxin formerly known as white bread - until I came upon Aisle 9: cleansers. Aisle 9. It looked like an ordinary aisle. In fact, it looked a lot like Aisle 8. But it wasn't. Aisle 9 opened my eyes to a whole new world. If memory serves me, my experience was remarkably close to that of characters in that old high school reading requirement, Aldous Huxley's Brave New World.
SPORTS
March 5, 2011 | By T.J. Furman, Inquirer Staff Writer
Show your love for J.D. Drew, Philly It's been more than 13 years since J.D. Drew decided he'd rather slum it in St. Paul, Minn., than play for the Phillies. Drew's contract with the Boston Red Sox is up after this season, and he's not sure if he's going to come back next season - to Boston or to baseball. "I don't really know what I'm going to do, I'm leaning both ways. I guess, I don't really know," Drew said, according to the Boston Herald. Drew's career OPS stands at .886, and he has been above the league average in that category every year of his career but one. In the 2007 AL Championship Series, he hit a grand slam in the first inning of Game 6 with the Red Sox facing elimination.
NEWS
August 24, 2007 | By Karen Youso, MINNEAPOLIS STAR TRIBUNE
Rows of colorful clothing flapping in a sunny breeze are no longer an everyday sight. Yesteryear's practice of hanging out the wash fell victim to that true object of convenience, the clothes dryer, which did the job quickly, day or night, and in any kind of weather. But as climate-change concerns and energy awareness grow, homeowners are getting reacquainted with the clothesline. Using free solar and wind energy instead of a dryer can prevent the emission of 1,500 pounds of greenhouse gases every year, some experts estimate, while saving a family of four up to $100 a year.
NEWS
March 10, 2008 | By Sandy Bauers, Inquirer Staff Writer
I was feeling so smug the other morning. Down in the basement, I was draping wet socks over a rack, hanging T-shirts from a line and flopping jeans over a bar. The clothes dryer - that energy hog! - was empty. Except for laundry emergencies, it's been that way for months. And, really, it hasn't been so bad, stiff towels notwithstanding. But that night, when I got home, I paused at the top of the basement steps. Ack! I'd left the lights on all day. Since becoming The Inquirer's environment reporter two years ago, I've been trying to take it easy on the Earth, reduce my carbon footprint, lessen my impact.
NEWS
October 30, 1995 | by Jonathan Takiff, Daily News Staff Writer
Unquestionably, the new Electric Factory nightclub is bringing excitement to the live entertainment scene. Its contemporary music bookings are timely and tantalizingly packaged. The size of the room (3,000 capacity) and concept (new rock for all ages, and those over 21 can drink) is right for the times. Parking is decent and could be very good, if more lot-rich neighbors (like American Red Cross) participated and the police weren't so itchy to ticket and tow illegally parked cars.
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
ARTICLES BY DATE
SPORTS
March 5, 2011 | By T.J. Furman, Inquirer Staff Writer
Show your love for J.D. Drew, Philly It's been more than 13 years since J.D. Drew decided he'd rather slum it in St. Paul, Minn., than play for the Phillies. Drew's contract with the Boston Red Sox is up after this season, and he's not sure if he's going to come back next season - to Boston or to baseball. "I don't really know what I'm going to do, I'm leaning both ways. I guess, I don't really know," Drew said, according to the Boston Herald. Drew's career OPS stands at .886, and he has been above the league average in that category every year of his career but one. In the 2007 AL Championship Series, he hit a grand slam in the first inning of Game 6 with the Red Sox facing elimination.
LIVING
June 26, 2009 | By Alan J. Heavens INQUIRER REAL ESTATE WRITER
I need to feed you a line - a clothesline, in this case, which, without fear of contradiction, remains the most energy-efficient way of drying laundry. The humble clothesline is, however, not the best way of doing it. Sheets can freeze as stiff as boards even on the sunniest of winter days. It can rain at a moment's notice. Birds . . . well . . . birds can leave a clean shirt in need of fresh laundering in the blink of an eye. One more thing: Energy-efficient doesn't mean quick, and the clothesline is not a surefire cure to discovering Johnny's soccer uniform is still dirty a couple of hours before today's game and needs a wash and dry. So, the easiest way to get your clothes dry is with an electric or gas dryer.
NEWS
March 10, 2008 | By Sandy Bauers, Inquirer Staff Writer
I was feeling so smug the other morning. Down in the basement, I was draping wet socks over a rack, hanging T-shirts from a line and flopping jeans over a bar. The clothes dryer - that energy hog! - was empty. Except for laundry emergencies, it's been that way for months. And, really, it hasn't been so bad, stiff towels notwithstanding. But that night, when I got home, I paused at the top of the basement steps. Ack! I'd left the lights on all day. Since becoming The Inquirer's environment reporter two years ago, I've been trying to take it easy on the Earth, reduce my carbon footprint, lessen my impact.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 29, 2008 | By David Hiltbrand INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
When George Stanford plays a free show at noon today at World Cafe Live, the singer/songwriter will switch from guitar to piano to . . . trombone? The slide horn is the first instrument Stanford learned to play when growing up in Narberth, and he can't give it up. "I was just attracted to it," he says while driving to a show in Virginia. "It looked like a good time. I still love the sound of the horn. " If you ever caught a performance by Townhall, a popular local group that Stanford fronted for six years, you know the trombone is an important part of his repertoire.
NEWS
August 24, 2007 | By Karen Youso, MINNEAPOLIS STAR TRIBUNE
Rows of colorful clothing flapping in a sunny breeze are no longer an everyday sight. Yesteryear's practice of hanging out the wash fell victim to that true object of convenience, the clothes dryer, which did the job quickly, day or night, and in any kind of weather. But as climate-change concerns and energy awareness grow, homeowners are getting reacquainted with the clothesline. Using free solar and wind energy instead of a dryer can prevent the emission of 1,500 pounds of greenhouse gases every year, some experts estimate, while saving a family of four up to $100 a year.
NEWS
January 13, 2005 | By Marcianne Waters
I went grocery shopping today for the bazillionth time since that magical day when I became, as even the IRS terms it, "head of household. " It was the usual - skim milk, designer eggs, and that toxin formerly known as white bread - until I came upon Aisle 9: cleansers. Aisle 9. It looked like an ordinary aisle. In fact, it looked a lot like Aisle 8. But it wasn't. Aisle 9 opened my eyes to a whole new world. If memory serves me, my experience was remarkably close to that of characters in that old high school reading requirement, Aldous Huxley's Brave New World.
NEWS
January 5, 2001 | By Richard V. Sabatini, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
For 15 years, volunteer firefighter Chris Russell has battled blazes and helped fire victims recover after their losses. Yesterday, Russell, his wife and three children lost everything when fire swept through the Fairless Hills ranch home they had been renting. The 7:41 a.m. blaze was blamed on a clothes dryer in the rear room of the first floor, Falls Fire Marshal Ed Copper said. "Just what occurred, we don't know yet. But it definitely was caused by the dryer, which had been running," Copper said.
NEWS
August 13, 1999
Faulkner's widow is playing for sympathy Maureen Faulkner is the Fraternal Order of Police poster girl for Mumia Abu-Jamal's execution. The FOP has pumped many thousands into "Justice for Police Officer Daniel Faulkner Inc. " to exploit the emotional appeal of the lonely-widow-going-it-alone myth. Faulkner has the support of Philadelphia's law enforcement, judicial and political elite. How does the FOP, Maureen in tow, dare to try to appear as underdogs in the face of all the political forces against Abu-Jamal?
NEWS
October 30, 1995 | by Jonathan Takiff, Daily News Staff Writer
Unquestionably, the new Electric Factory nightclub is bringing excitement to the live entertainment scene. Its contemporary music bookings are timely and tantalizingly packaged. The size of the room (3,000 capacity) and concept (new rock for all ages, and those over 21 can drink) is right for the times. Parking is decent and could be very good, if more lot-rich neighbors (like American Red Cross) participated and the police weren't so itchy to ticket and tow illegally parked cars.
NEWS
April 23, 1994 | For The Inquirer / MARTY O'GRADY
A fire at Garden State Race Track left three employees needing treatment for smoke inhalation yesterday, including track fire marshal Ann Romond (center). Cherry Hill fire officials said a clothes dryer near the sixth- floor kitchen of the Phoenix Room restaurant overheated as a result of lint buildup. The restaurant reopened about an hour later. Checking Romond is emergency medical technician Brenda Rosser (left).
1 | 2 | Next »
|
|
|
|
|