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Cloves

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NEWS
February 8, 1998 | By Andrew Maykuth, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Ever since the slave trade died out a century ago, this sweltering coral island off Africa's Indian Ocean coast has made its living from a single commodity - cloves. Cloves are a peculiar thing upon which to base an economy. Traditionally used as a painkiller, the spice is mostly associated in the modern West with holiday cooking. In truth, most cloves are not eaten but inhaled - they are smoked in cigarettes that are popular in Asia. Zanzibar, whose name is synonymous with adventure, fortune and exotic flavor, once owned the clove trade the way OPEC owns oil. Expensive and scarce, cloves generated a brisk income for this 50-mile-long island and its sister isle, Pemba.
FOOD
January 16, 2015 | By Craig LaBan, Inquirer Restaurant Critic
Over the last few months, I've been souping it up in Pho-ladelphia. Home to the third largest Vietnamese population on the East Coast, this city has long been a destination for many great renditions of the deeply warming and aromatic noodle soup. Few meals in the world deliver more satisfaction for $10 or less. And since the winter chill settled in, slurping through a steamy pool of exotic broth, rice noodles, Thai basil, and sundry cuts of meat has been the equivalent of hitting the "defrost" button.
FOOD
December 20, 2007
After so many disappointing takeoffs on Philly's beloved soft pretzels - chocolate, sweet, stuffed, etc. - we're happy to report that someone finally got it right. James Barrett's blend of sourdough and whole wheat with fennel seed and anise flavors gives Metropolitan's savory soft pretzels the take-me-home, serve-to-guests quality our favorite street food never quite achieved. Scoop of the year A 7-inch handle lets you dip easily into those slim coffee bags. No more plastic scoops buried in beans.
FOOD
October 10, 1999 | By Maria Gallagher, FOR THE INQUIRER
What: E-Z-Rol garlic peeler Manufacturer: The Omessi Group Ltd., Northridge, Calif. Where: Kitchen Kapers (all locations) Price: $7.99 Purpose: Peels raw garlic cloves This peeler, which looks like a soft plastic cannoli cylinder, will prove indispensable to anyone with a bumper crop of basil and a desire to turn it all into pesto before the first frost. The instructions are almost too easy to believe: Place one clove of raw garlic inside the flexible 5 1/2-inch tube and roll the tube on a flat surface with a gentle downward pressure until the garlic skin makes a crackling sound.
NEWS
May 10, 2012 | By Alison Ladman, Associated Press
Try this Carne Asada with a punchy marinade of lime juice, Worcestershire sauce, and garlic. Carne Asada With Salsa Makes 6 servings For the meat: 2 pounds sirloin tips 2 tablespoons lime juice 1 teaspoon salt 2 tablespoons Worcestershire sauce 2 tablespoons olive oil 1 teaspoon ground black pepper 2 cloves garlic, smashed For the salsa: 1 yellow bell pepper, cored...
ENTERTAINMENT
July 26, 2007 | By JIM ROMANOFF, For the Associated Press
If you think healthy eating condemns you to bland, flavorless foods, you've clearly never tried roasted garlic. Roasting a head of garlic not only is an almost effortless way to mellow its harsh bite, it also creates a lush, concentrated puree perfect for dressing up all manner of foods. "For the diet-conscious, it is a godsend," said Barbara Kafka, author of the cookbook "Roasting: A Simple Art. " "Its sticky texture and round feel in the mouth substitute divinely for fat and [it]
FOOD
August 19, 1987 | Special to the Daily News
Use your microwave oven to quick-peel garlic, whether the garlic is intended for a microwave or conventional cooking recipe. Because the garlic will partially cook and become soft and less pungent, use this quick-peel technique for recipes that call for a mild garlic flavor. 1. Put a whole head of garlic on a plate or paper napkin. Microwave on high (100 percent power) for 20 seconds, turn head upside down and microwave on high 25 more seconds. The garlic is done when it "whistles.
FOOD
September 17, 1986 | By LIBBY GOLDSTEIN, Special to the Daily News
Without a doubt, it is now garlic time (and time for shallots, too.) Local garlic growers will have harvested "the stinking rose" months ago. And if they had some sense, they saved the largest outer cloves of their garlic heads to plant for next year's crop. Some people we know just can't save any garlic because their habit is too consuming. Well, you still have time to order cloves from seed and plant catalogs if you want, or go to Reading Terminal, or Southside Produce, or 9th Street and buy some extra eating garlic to plant.
FOOD
January 4, 1989 | By Polly Fisher, Special to the Daily News
Dear Polly: My sister's home town (20 miles away) recycles glass, paper and aluminum, so I save mine and bring it there. You'd be surprised at how much you can accumulate in a few weeks' time. I even talked my mother-in-law into saving her refuse and I take it in for her. This really reduces my garbage collection bill (it's only a quarter of what it used to be!) and it helps my sister's community because the money is used to maintain their town swimming pool. It also helps the environment by reducing the overload of dumping sites and saves our natural resources.
FOOD
June 26, 1996 | by Aliza Green, Special to the Daily News
YO, CHEFS! I am a garlic lover and particularly love the taste of roasted garlic. However, my roasted garlic never tastes as good as that I've sampled at Baci Bistro on Broad Street. What is their secret to making their roasted garlic so tasty? Eve Thomas Oaklyn, N.J. Baci's chef, James Felton, starts by slicing about 1 inch off the top of a whole head of garlic. He then seasons the cut garlic with salt, pepper, a pinch of cayenne and a generous sprinkling of paprika.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
FOOD
January 16, 2015 | By Craig LaBan, Inquirer Restaurant Critic
Over the last few months, I've been souping it up in Pho-ladelphia. Home to the third largest Vietnamese population on the East Coast, this city has long been a destination for many great renditions of the deeply warming and aromatic noodle soup. Few meals in the world deliver more satisfaction for $10 or less. And since the winter chill settled in, slurping through a steamy pool of exotic broth, rice noodles, Thai basil, and sundry cuts of meat has been the equivalent of hitting the "defrost" button.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 16, 2012
Jake's Sandwich Board (122 S. 12th) is seeking a few hungry garlic lovers. These brave souls will attempt the shop's 5 Pound Philly Challenge from noon to 2 p.m. Friday while the Travel Channel's "Food Paradise" documents the experience. The challenge features a supersized 2-foot-long, 3-pound version of Jake's Garlic Bomb — a cheesesteak with roasted garlic spread, sautéed garlic and deep-fried garlic cloves — accompanied by 24 Peanut Chews, 12 Tastykakes, four soft pretzels and one Champ cherry soda.
NEWS
May 10, 2012 | By Alison Ladman, Associated Press
Try this Carne Asada with a punchy marinade of lime juice, Worcestershire sauce, and garlic. Carne Asada With Salsa Makes 6 servings For the meat: 2 pounds sirloin tips 2 tablespoons lime juice 1 teaspoon salt 2 tablespoons Worcestershire sauce 2 tablespoons olive oil 1 teaspoon ground black pepper 2 cloves garlic, smashed For the salsa: 1 yellow bell pepper, cored...
FOOD
December 20, 2007
After so many disappointing takeoffs on Philly's beloved soft pretzels - chocolate, sweet, stuffed, etc. - we're happy to report that someone finally got it right. James Barrett's blend of sourdough and whole wheat with fennel seed and anise flavors gives Metropolitan's savory soft pretzels the take-me-home, serve-to-guests quality our favorite street food never quite achieved. Scoop of the year A 7-inch handle lets you dip easily into those slim coffee bags. No more plastic scoops buried in beans.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 26, 2007 | By JIM ROMANOFF, For the Associated Press
If you think healthy eating condemns you to bland, flavorless foods, you've clearly never tried roasted garlic. Roasting a head of garlic not only is an almost effortless way to mellow its harsh bite, it also creates a lush, concentrated puree perfect for dressing up all manner of foods. "For the diet-conscious, it is a godsend," said Barbara Kafka, author of the cookbook "Roasting: A Simple Art. " "Its sticky texture and round feel in the mouth substitute divinely for fat and [it]
FOOD
September 3, 2000 | By Craig LaBan, INQUIRER FOOD WRITER
It is the ultimate instrument of flavor in my repertoire of minimalist cooking. It is my definitive improv riff, capable of giving my late summer garden harvest a fragrant high-gloss sheen, or, satisfying my hunger as is, just plain. And though it is virtually invisible, a simple sauce of garlic and olive oil done right can be more memorable than all the dark stock and frothy butter sauces in France. Then again, aglio e olio is Italian. Aaaah-leo-ooooh-leo. It's as delicious to say as it is to eat. So why, I've often wondered, is it so hard to find a proper rendition in restaurants?
FOOD
October 10, 1999 | By Maria Gallagher, FOR THE INQUIRER
What: E-Z-Rol garlic peeler Manufacturer: The Omessi Group Ltd., Northridge, Calif. Where: Kitchen Kapers (all locations) Price: $7.99 Purpose: Peels raw garlic cloves This peeler, which looks like a soft plastic cannoli cylinder, will prove indispensable to anyone with a bumper crop of basil and a desire to turn it all into pesto before the first frost. The instructions are almost too easy to believe: Place one clove of raw garlic inside the flexible 5 1/2-inch tube and roll the tube on a flat surface with a gentle downward pressure until the garlic skin makes a crackling sound.
FOOD
February 3, 1999 | by Peggy Landers, Daily News Food Editor
It can make your roses more fragrant - and repel the aphids that love to nosh on their leaves. It may lower the risk of colon cancer. Some swear it scares away vampires. King Tutankhamen was buried with six heads of it. Even Pliny the Elder 2,000 years ago rhapsodized over its supposed qualities - good for asthma, coughs, dropsy, earaches, tapeworms and sexual dysfunction. "Alio magna vis," Pliny wrote. "Garlic has powerful properties. " (A declaration that would elicit a big "duh" in certain Italian, Thai and Chinese circles, where cooks have worshiped the allium seemingly forever.
NEWS
February 8, 1998 | By Andrew Maykuth, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Ever since the slave trade died out a century ago, this sweltering coral island off Africa's Indian Ocean coast has made its living from a single commodity - cloves. Cloves are a peculiar thing upon which to base an economy. Traditionally used as a painkiller, the spice is mostly associated in the modern West with holiday cooking. In truth, most cloves are not eaten but inhaled - they are smoked in cigarettes that are popular in Asia. Zanzibar, whose name is synonymous with adventure, fortune and exotic flavor, once owned the clove trade the way OPEC owns oil. Expensive and scarce, cloves generated a brisk income for this 50-mile-long island and its sister isle, Pemba.
FOOD
July 31, 1996 | By Marilynn Marter, INQUIRER FOOD WRITER
If you are happy with just one kind of apple, eat only iceberg lettuce and want nothing more than plain white buttons for mushrooms, you might find the following news a bit shocking: Garlic is being treated like some new kind of exotic. "For years garlic was just plain garlic, and it fell between the cracks," said Ron Engeland, author of Growing Great Garlic. "People couldn't decide if it was a spice or a vegetable or what. Now they've discovered it as a food. " Garlic greens and bulbil caps (secondary, bud-like, cloves)
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