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NEWS
August 27, 2009 | By Wendy Rosenfield FOR THE INQUIRER
These are busy days for Pig Iron Theatre Company's Quinn Bauriedel - as are most days for most members of Pig Iron, currently one of Philadelphia's most successful cultural exports. Aside from sculpting its Live Arts Festival world premiere, Welcome to Yuba City - a collaboration with master clown Giovanni Fusetti and Philly native/New York-based composer extraordinaire Michael Friedman - everyone involved, from 10 official company members to the occasional guest, is busy creating side projects, collecting awards, or winning grants.
NEWS
January 6, 2009 | By A.D. Amorosi FOR THE INQUIRER
"He's so cute," shouts Marisa Rosenstock, a 25-year-old student from Center City. "I love him so much. " "I wouldn't miss a second of him," says Courtney Ray, a 24-year-old merchandiser from Norristown. They, along with more than 600 others - Rocky Balboa impersonators included - are swooning over the best-selling author. But it's not Malcolm Gladwell or John Grogan they've come to see. Despite warnings from security not to touch the star, the throng strains to touch, hug, kiss.
NEWS
September 5, 2008
YOUR ONLINE poll the other day, asking "Do you think Sarah Palin will wear her hair up or down for the big speech tonight?" is, in a word, disgraceful. I'm sure that had Mitt Romney or Tim Pawlenty been named the vice presidential nominee, you would have been worried about the color of his tie, rather than the actual substance of the speech he was planning to present, right? Evan Davis Philadelphia IN REGARD to Mr. Andrew Dankanich's comments on the Democratic Convention: He asked, "Is this what politics is all about, the art of illusion and trickery, maybe sabotage and intimidation?"
NEWS
July 15, 2008
The three-ring circus known as the Montgomery County Board of Commissioners continues to perform twice a month in Norristown. It's a colorful act that has gone on for six months now in the traditionally quiet county seat. Two of the performers - Republican Commissioner James Matthews and Democrat Joseph Hoeffel - are running the show, while Republican Bruce Castor rides on a unicycle. Despite being in opposite political parties, Matthews and Hoeffel vote together on all the key issues in an unusual power-sharing agreement.
NEWS
March 28, 2007 | By Karen Heller INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Pig Iron Theatre Company's 20th production marries the work of Russia's greatest playwright with Dr. Paul D. MacLean's Triune Brain Theory and behaviorist and autism pioneer Temple Grandin's Animals in Translation. In this regard, it is atypically typical, an original work born of experimentation that is as much physical as verbal, tying theatrical history to intellectual ideas with a great deal of movement and clowning, to say nothing of hats. Hats are a Pig Iron constant.
NEWS
March 28, 2007 | By Karen Heller, Inquirer Staff Writer
Pig Iron Theatre Company's 20th production marries the work of Russia's greatest playwright with Dr. Paul D. MacLean's Triune Brain Theory and behaviorist and autism pioneer Temple Grandin's Animals in Translation . In this regard, it is atypically typical, an original work born of experimentation that is as much physical as verbal, tying theatrical history to intellectual ideas with a great deal of movement and clowning, to say nothing of...
NEWS
October 5, 2006 | By Toby Zinman FOR THE INQUIRER
"The clown always says, 'Yes, but . . .' " The clown speaking is Emmanuelle Delpech-Ramey, a young woman about to transform herself into an old woman in 1812 Productions' season-opener, Madame Douce-Amere, which begins previews tomorrow. Delpech-Ramey's play, a hit at the 2005 Live Arts/Fringe Festival, tells its story entirely without speaking, and she is an eloquent clown, nothing like that annoying guy-in-a-box mime. In French, douce-amere means "bittersweet," and it is exactly this "yes, but" quality that captures the life of a woman who falls in love, marries, raises a child, and eventually has to cope with life alone, haunted by memories.
NEWS
October 5, 2005 | By Lini S. Kadaba INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Retirement, for many, no longer equates to leisure time. Instead, it's all about purposeful pursuits. The trick is figuring out what to do. These people followed different paths but arrived at a similar place: Gloria Rivers: Teacher to clown After Gloria Rivers retired from teaching in 1992, she frequented Atlantic City casinos. Before long, the Aston, Delaware County, resident realized that was a waste. Rivers, who doesn't care to tell her age, then took classes, in flower arranging and ceramics ("How many dishes and spoon rests can you do?"
ENTERTAINMENT
September 25, 2005 | By Carlin Romano INQUIRER BOOK CRITIC
In the cramped office of his Random House publicist, Salman Rushdie sits alone before tall stacks of his ninth novel, Shalimar the Clown (Random House, $25.95). The rectangular piles form a kind of mini-skyline as Rushdie, Kong-like behind them, does his duty. Signing. There will always be signing. It's what counts for heavy lifting in the generally cerebral life of a mainstream author - the little touch aimed at forging a personal bond between writer and reader. Just one sign of normality.
NEWS
August 22, 2005 | By Susan Snyder INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Planning a wedding? You might want to schedule it for next year's Unity Day, and not just for theme's sake. Organizers of yesterday's giant community picnic that drew hundreds of thousands to the Benjamin Franklin Parkway boast that it has rained significantly only one time since the event started in 1978. And despite stifling heat that at times made it feel nearly 100 degrees - prime conditions for thunderstorms - this year's event was another sunshine sensation, from beginning to end. So on went the music, eclectic food stands, games for children, and clowns handing out balloons, among other activities.
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