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NEWS
March 28, 2007 | By Karen Heller, Inquirer Staff Writer
Pig Iron Theatre Company's 20th production marries the work of Russia's greatest playwright with Dr. Paul D. MacLean's Triune Brain Theory and behaviorist and autism pioneer Temple Grandin's Animals in Translation . In this regard, it is atypically typical, an original work born of experimentation that is as much physical as verbal, tying theatrical history to intellectual ideas with a great deal of movement and clowning, to say nothing of...
NEWS
October 5, 2006 | By Toby Zinman FOR THE INQUIRER
"The clown always says, 'Yes, but . . .' " The clown speaking is Emmanuelle Delpech-Ramey, a young woman about to transform herself into an old woman in 1812 Productions' season-opener, Madame Douce-Amere, which begins previews tomorrow. Delpech-Ramey's play, a hit at the 2005 Live Arts/Fringe Festival, tells its story entirely without speaking, and she is an eloquent clown, nothing like that annoying guy-in-a-box mime. In French, douce-amere means "bittersweet," and it is exactly this "yes, but" quality that captures the life of a woman who falls in love, marries, raises a child, and eventually has to cope with life alone, haunted by memories.
NEWS
October 5, 2005 | By Lini S. Kadaba INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Retirement, for many, no longer equates to leisure time. Instead, it's all about purposeful pursuits. The trick is figuring out what to do. These people followed different paths but arrived at a similar place: Gloria Rivers: Teacher to clown After Gloria Rivers retired from teaching in 1992, she frequented Atlantic City casinos. Before long, the Aston, Delaware County, resident realized that was a waste. Rivers, who doesn't care to tell her age, then took classes, in flower arranging and ceramics ("How many dishes and spoon rests can you do?"
ENTERTAINMENT
September 25, 2005 | By Carlin Romano INQUIRER BOOK CRITIC
In the cramped office of his Random House publicist, Salman Rushdie sits alone before tall stacks of his ninth novel, Shalimar the Clown (Random House, $25.95). The rectangular piles form a kind of mini-skyline as Rushdie, Kong-like behind them, does his duty. Signing. There will always be signing. It's what counts for heavy lifting in the generally cerebral life of a mainstream author - the little touch aimed at forging a personal bond between writer and reader. Just one sign of normality.
NEWS
August 22, 2005 | By Susan Snyder INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Planning a wedding? You might want to schedule it for next year's Unity Day, and not just for theme's sake. Organizers of yesterday's giant community picnic that drew hundreds of thousands to the Benjamin Franklin Parkway boast that it has rained significantly only one time since the event started in 1978. And despite stifling heat that at times made it feel nearly 100 degrees - prime conditions for thunderstorms - this year's event was another sunshine sensation, from beginning to end. So on went the music, eclectic food stands, games for children, and clowns handing out balloons, among other activities.
SPORTS
August 18, 2005 | By Shannon Ryan INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The sight of a shirtless Terrell Owens conducting interviews while working on his six-pack last week was one brand of odd. The guy in the black thong, matching push-up bra, and high heels took weird to a whole new level. The circus that follows T.O. like controversy made a stop in South Philadelphia yesterday, when the wide receiver returned from a weeklong dismissal from the Eagles. About two dozen fans - lured by radio contests and eager to let their displeasure with Owens be known - held signs and waited to greet Owens in the morning.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 24, 2005 | By Carrie Rickey INQUIRER MOVIE CRITIC
They all laughed when Betty Thomas announced she was making a classic '70s TV show into a feature film. When The Brady Bunch Movie hit, she had the last laugh. They all laughed when Jerry Bruckheimer announced he was turning a Disneyland theme-park ride into a movie. When Pirates of the Caribbean hit, he had the last laugh. They all laughed when Nora Ephron announced she was updating a beloved '60s TV comedy. With Bewitched, they have a point. Bewitched is . . . not unfunny.
NEWS
April 22, 2005 | By George Anastasia INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Imam Shamsud-din Ali boasted about his close ties to Mayor Street in a conversation secretly recorded by the FBI four years ago but complained about the "network of clowns" he had to deal with in city government. The conversation, picked up on an FBI wiretap of Ali's phone in October 2001, was one of the first played for a jury yesterday as the racketeering trial of Ali opened in U.S. District Court. The prominent Muslim cleric is charged with using his influence to set up a series of fraudulent schemes through which he and companies he controlled generated thousands of dollars in illegal cash.
NEWS
February 27, 2005 | By Terry Bitman INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Return with us now to those thrilling days of yesteryear when WIBG radio rocked Philadelphia's teenagers and Willie the Worm wooed the preschool set on television. When the zany Ernie Kovacs cavorted in the morning, and things went bump in the night with that cool ghoul Roland and his wife, My Dear, so shy she never left her coffin. When the dulcet voice of John Facenda made us feel comfy as he signed off his local newscasts by wishing all a "good night tonight and a good day tomorrow.
NEWS
October 5, 2004 | By David Hiltbrand INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Pop Lit America (The Book) By "The Daily Show With Jon Stewart" 240 pp., $24.95 Not content with their nightly skewering of current events on Comedy Central, Jon Stewart and the other writers of The Daily Show have taken on a bigger target in America (The Book): lampooning all of U.S. history. Masquerading as a high school textbook (right down to the authentic "This Book is the Property of:" box stamped on the inside flap), America is the wildest civics lesson you'll ever get. It's full of hilariously apocryphal information, including the assertion that in 1978 President Jimmy Carter nominated NBA scoring machine George "The Iceman" Gervin to the Supreme Court in an "attempt to fundamentally alter the make-up of the Court by adding size, athleticism, and a patented 'finger roll' . . . Ultimately the vacancy was filled by Ruth 'Chocolate Thunder' Ginsberg.
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