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NEWS
October 9, 1988 | By Steve Birnbaum, Special to The Inquirer
My wife and I would like to take our children to England this year for a traditional, old-fashioned Christmas. Our daughter, in particular, would like to see some of the places associated with Charles Dickens, because she has been reading some of his works in her English class. Can you give us any suggestions? Somehow, Christmas in England does seem to have a very special flavor - for which Dickens should probably get at least part of the credit. One of the companies that offers old-fashioned Christmas tours will have a special emphasis on Dickens.
NEWS
July 1, 1990 | By Donald D. Groff, Special to The Inquirer
BULGARIAN HOLIDAY. What was once a posh resort for Communist Party high officials will become an international Club Med under an agreement signed recently in Paris. Situated north of the Black Sea port of Varna, the resort will be called the Holiday Club Riviera and is scheduled to open in 1991 with a capacity of 600. Twenty miles to the south, Club Med has operated Club Med Roussalka since 1968 for guests with foreign currency. Paris-based Club Med runs 110 resorts around the world, and its past experience in old Soviet bloc countries makes it a likely partner for joint ventures as tourism interests grow in those nations.
NEWS
April 5, 2009 | By Lisa Galley FOR THE INQUIRER
It happens to even the most ardent skier. On the first day of the season, you question why you like this sport. You schlep your equipment, don an outfit that would make a supermodel look chunky, schlep some more, and strap on your skis. Exhausted, you sit on the lift, thinking, "I could be in the islands. . . . " The answer comes quickly. Skiing is simply exhilarating. This year, my ski season began in the Italian Alps. A friend and I joined a group trip to a Club Med in Sestriere, near Turin.
NEWS
October 17, 1993 | By Donald D. Groff, FOR THE INQUIRER
Fewer Americans are taking a vacation or pleasure trip this fall, a travel industry group says, and the reason is uncertainty about the economy. Forty-four percent of Americans are "very likely" to take a trip somewhere this fall, down from 54 percent last year, according to a survey by the Travel Industry Association of America. The association attributed the decline to a less optimistic outlook among potential travelers compared to last autumn, when the fall election climate boosted expectations.
NEWS
April 22, 2001 | By Robert Zausner INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
To all-inclusive or not to all-inclusive? The answer lies in another question: What is a vacation, anyway? It's supposed to be that one time of year (two, if you're lucky) to shed the stress of daily life, to bust open the piggy bank and splurge a little. So why do you see so many people hassling with travel arrangements, trekking to restaurants with kids' menus and lines out to the curb, and searching endlessly for a $5 T-shirt that doesn't bear the name of last year's Super Bowl runner-up?
ENTERTAINMENT
February 17, 1989 | New York Daily News
Ever since Nov. 22, 1963, visitors to Dallas have been morbidly fascinated with the site and the events surrounding the assassination of President John F. Kennedy. Almost any day at various times, visitors can be seen milling around Dealey Plaza and the Texas School Book Depository Building. Beginning Monday, visitors will be able to visit the sixth floor of the building from where Lee Harvey Oswald allegedly fired the shots that killed JFK and injured Texas Gov. John Connally.
NEWS
April 8, 1988 | Marc Schogol and including reports from the New York Daily News and from Inquirer wire services
UNHEALTHFUL BUILDINGS. Respiratory disease risks can be 45 percent to 100 percent higher in modern, airtight buildings. In "tight" buildings with closed ventilation systems, airborne germs and viruses recirculate and concentrate, a Walter Reed Army Institute of Research team writes in the Journal of the American Medical Association. In "leaky" buildings, such disease agents are diluted and vented. WOMEN IN PRISON. The equal-rights movement has caused judges to sentence more women to prison for longer terms.
NEWS
October 19, 1986 | By Jonathan Storm, Inquirer Staff Writer
Club Med Punta Cana in the Dominican Republic is sponsoring a theme week Nov. 8 through 15 called "Women of Today . . . Looking Toward Tomorrow. " Experts galore (nutritionists, columnists, executives, sex counselors, accountants) will lead discussions and give personal consultations. Price from New York is $799, and that includes air fare and all the usual Club Med stuff: water sports, aerobics, computers, tennis, unending food, free wine with lunch and dinner, nightly entertainment.
NEWS
April 23, 2000 | By Donald D. Groff, FOR THE INQUIRER
St. Croix often takes a back seat to its sibling islands of St. Thomas and St. John, but last month it became No. 1 in the hearts of vacationing gamblers with the opening of the Divi Carina Bay Casino, the first and only casino in the U.S. Virgin Islands. The casino is affiliated with and located across from the Divi Carina Bay resort, which opened last fall with 126 rooms and 20 villas at the island's east end. The resort got off to a bumpy start when it suffered damage from Hurricanes Jose and Lenny.
NEWS
May 31, 2014 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writer
Philip Isaac "Zak" Margolis III, 42, a Philadelphia native, traveler, and adventurer, died Friday, May 23, in California doing the thing he loved best - piloting a helicopter. Officials in Ventura County said Mr. Margolis - known to everyone as Zak - died at 10:13 a.m. when the aircraft clipped some power lines and crashed onto a dry riverbed west of the Santa Paula Airport, igniting a brushfire. The cause of the crash was under investigation by federal aviation officials. The Oxnard, Calif., resident had rented the helicopter about 9 a.m. from a business at the Oxnard Airport and was expected to return about 10 a.m. to meet family.
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