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Coal Companies

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BUSINESS
July 8, 1993 | By Andrew Maykuth, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Struggling Westmoreland Coal Co. yesterday lauded an agreement it reached last week with the United Mine Workers of America, saying the new contract would reduce costs for small coal companies and increase competitiveness while protecting union jobs. The Philadelphia mining firm and union representatives hailed the agreement with such enthusiasm that, given the history of labor relations in the coal industry, it was like hearing the Hatfields praise the McCoys. "This contract provides a unique opportunity for labor and management to join in making Westmoreland competitive and returning the company to profitability," said Westmoreland president Christopher K. Seglem.
NEWS
September 22, 2002 | By Patrick Kerkstra INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Over the last two centuries, abandoned coal mines leaking a toxic mix of sulfuric acid and heavy metals have fouled more than 3,100 miles of Pennsylvania rivers and streams, making them the chief source of water pollution in the commonwealth. Soon, the problem that state officials and environmentalists already describe as "terrible" could get worse, and present Pennsylvania with a grim choice: allow a new tsunami of poisons to contaminate dozens more waterways - or pay tens of millions of dollars a year, every year forever, to control it. "Our streams are in deplorable condition, and they are hardly done paying for the games of the coal companies," State Rep. Camille George (D., Clearfield)
NEWS
December 27, 2012
Joan Mulhern, 51, a forceful advocate for the environment who lobbied Congress and often rallied public support to sway lawmakers to her cause, died Dec. 18 of liver disease at MedStar Georgetown University Hospital in Washington. Her death was relayed by a sister, Marie Mulhern. Ms. Mulhern had been the senior legislative counsel for Earthjustice, a nonprofit environmental law firm, since 1999. She fought repeated attempts by Congress to limit the scope of the Clean Water Act and battled coal companies and government officials over mountaintop-removal coal mining, in which mountains are blasted away to create strip mines.
BUSINESS
January 19, 1989 | By Aaron Epstein, Inquirer Washington Bureau
It is unconstitutional for local tax assessors to systematically raise values of recently purchased properties while not raising assessments on comparable, unsold properties, the Supreme Court unanimously ruled yesterday. However, the justices specifically declined to decide the constitutionality of state laws adopting so-called "welcome stranger" tax policies, such as one enacted in California in 1978. Under the "welcome stranger" method, local officials raise the assessments of recently sold properties according to their market value, but leave intact the low, outdated assessments of comparable properties that were not sold or built upon.
NEWS
February 28, 2013
Q: Might a company that rakes in a lot of money still be a bad investment? - L.D., Worcester, Mass.   A: It's possible. Remember that the money a company takes in (its revenue, or sales) is its top line. Before you get to its bottom line of profits, you have to take out expenses, such as salaries, supplies and taxes. It's critical to know how much (if anything) the company keeps as profit, and whether important numbers, such as sales and profits, are increasing. Arch Coal, for example, has had average annual revenue growth of more than 12 percent over the last five years, and growth has accelerated.
NEWS
February 22, 1991 | By Frederick Cusick and Walter F. Roche Jr., Inquirer Staff Writers
The FBI and the IRS are seeking detailed financial records from anthracite coal firms affiliated with an association lobbying on behalf of the hard-coal industry. The lobbying group, the Anthracite Industry Association, and its director were named in subpoenas issued in October by a federal grand jury investigating allegations of illegal campaign contributions by the coal industry. In a letter sent recently to executives of coal companies in Schuylkill and Carbon Counties, Wayne R. Gilbert, special agent in charge of the Philadelphia FBI office, asked for all financial records including "copies of checks and relevant documents" related to the Anthracite Industry Association (AIA)
NEWS
January 3, 2012
By Michael Carroll Pennsylvania's current natural-gas boom reminds me of the notice stamped on the deed of the house where I grew up in Mount Carmel, in the coal region. It warned that the deed did not "include title to the coal and right of support underneath the surface land," that "the owners of such coal may have the complete legal right to remove all of such coal," and that as a result, "damage may result to the surface of the land and any house, building or other structure on or in such land.
NEWS
November 20, 1993 | By Andrew Maykuth, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Members of United Mine Workers Local 1980 gathered around the fax machine in their drafty union hall in Crucible, Pa., yesterday awaiting word from Washington that their six-month strike was settled. The fax machine stayed quiet. "Everybody wants an end to this," said Mike Dulik, who is coordinating the strike at the Dilworth Mine, one of more than 70 mines in seven states that has been struck since May 10. About 17,500 miners are idled. Hopes crested late Thursday after negotiators for the UMW and the Bituminous Coal Operators Association (BCOA)
NEWS
July 18, 1995 | By Jeffrey Fleishman, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Bert Dale Holbrook, a 41-year-old coal miner with a seventh-grade education, was going for big money when he sat beside his four-pound file in the workers' compensation hearing room. He was used to the routine. In 1991, he began collecting temporary disability benefits for a back injury. Holbrook, a two-pack-a-day smoker, also received an $11,000 settlement from his former coal company for black lung disease. He had not worked in four years, and now Holbrook's eligibility to bring claims against his old employer was about to run out. So, he had returned to the hearing room, prepared to argue that he was losing his hearing and his back was getting worse.
NEWS
December 18, 1987 | By Mark Jaffe, Inquirer Staff Writer
The first hint of trouble came as sounds in the night. In the dark, as his family slept, Don Smith heard his house "creaking . . . like an old sailing ship groaning with the waves. " The next day the house, near Ebensburg in Cambria County, began to tip noticeably and the doors jammed. "The only way we could get in and out was through the basement because the front and back doors were stuck," Smith said. By the third day, the shifting ground had wrenched the gas and electric lines from the house and had wrecked the septic system.
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NEWS
February 28, 2013
Q: Might a company that rakes in a lot of money still be a bad investment? - L.D., Worcester, Mass.   A: It's possible. Remember that the money a company takes in (its revenue, or sales) is its top line. Before you get to its bottom line of profits, you have to take out expenses, such as salaries, supplies and taxes. It's critical to know how much (if anything) the company keeps as profit, and whether important numbers, such as sales and profits, are increasing. Arch Coal, for example, has had average annual revenue growth of more than 12 percent over the last five years, and growth has accelerated.
NEWS
January 12, 2013 | By Lawrence Messina and John Raby, Associated Press
CHARLESTON, W.Va. - Sen. John D. "Jay" Rockefeller 4th, who came to West Virginia as a young man from one of the world's richest families to work on antipoverty programs and remained in the state to build a political legacy, announced Friday that he will not seek a sixth term. The Democrat's decision comes at a time when his popularity is threatened because of his support for President Obama, who is wildly unpopular in the state, and his willingness to challenge the powerful coal industry, which he said has used divisive, fear-mongering tactics to wrongly blame the federal government for its problems.
NEWS
December 31, 2012
By Darryl Lorenzo Wellington Fifty years ago this month, the black gay novelist James Baldwin penned his powerful essay "A Letter to My Nephew. " In it, he wrote: "You were born into a society which spelled out with brutal clarity and in as many ways as possible that you were a worthless human being. " First published in the Progressive magazine and then reprinted in his book of essays The Fire Next Time , Baldwin's letter outlined what he called "the crux" of his dispute with America.
NEWS
December 27, 2012
Joan Mulhern, 51, a forceful advocate for the environment who lobbied Congress and often rallied public support to sway lawmakers to her cause, died Dec. 18 of liver disease at MedStar Georgetown University Hospital in Washington. Her death was relayed by a sister, Marie Mulhern. Ms. Mulhern had been the senior legislative counsel for Earthjustice, a nonprofit environmental law firm, since 1999. She fought repeated attempts by Congress to limit the scope of the Clean Water Act and battled coal companies and government officials over mountaintop-removal coal mining, in which mountains are blasted away to create strip mines.
NEWS
January 3, 2012
By Michael Carroll Pennsylvania's current natural-gas boom reminds me of the notice stamped on the deed of the house where I grew up in Mount Carmel, in the coal region. It warned that the deed did not "include title to the coal and right of support underneath the surface land," that "the owners of such coal may have the complete legal right to remove all of such coal," and that as a result, "damage may result to the surface of the land and any house, building or other structure on or in such land.
NEWS
April 20, 2010 | By William C. Kashatus
President Obama promised to strengthen oversight of the mining industry last week in the wake of the devastating explosion at West Virginia's Upper Big Branch mine. The accident was a reminder that in the coal industry, profits have always been more important than miners. Half a century ago, similar safety violations resulted in the Knox Mine disaster near Pittston, Pa. The Knox Coal Co. mined some of the Pennsylvania coal region's deepest and highest-quality coal. Although the larger Pennsylvania Coal Co. controlled the processing, transportation, and sale of the coal, it contracted the mining out to Knox, a nonunion company, to avoid safety risks, high costs, and labor conflicts.
BUSINESS
August 9, 2009 | By Diane Mastrull INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Overshadowed by the still-unresolved budget battle in Harrisburg, another legislative drama is playing out in relative obscurity. It involves arguably the most important piece of energy/environmental legislation pending in Pennsylvania. "The bill is absolutely crucial to Pennsylvania's economy, and public health, and environment for the next 15 years," said John Hanger, secretary of the Department of Environmental Protection. "The stakes are big. " So are the competing interests.
BUSINESS
August 23, 2008 | By Harold Brubaker INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Russian steelmaker OAO Severstal yesterday said it is buying a Western Pennsylvania coal company for $1.3 billion in cash, adding to the surge of Russian money into the United States. The deal for PBS Coals Group, which has 48,000 acres and 12 operating mines in Somerset County, is the second U.S. acquisition by a Russian steel company in 10 days and the 13th overall by Russian companies in the last 12 months. PBS is known as the owner of the Quecreek Mine that collapsed in 2002, trapping nine miners in a drama that played out on national TV. It also owned land where Flight 93 crashed on Sept.
NEWS
September 22, 2002 | By Patrick Kerkstra INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Over the last two centuries, abandoned coal mines leaking a toxic mix of sulfuric acid and heavy metals have fouled more than 3,100 miles of Pennsylvania rivers and streams, making them the chief source of water pollution in the commonwealth. Soon, the problem that state officials and environmentalists already describe as "terrible" could get worse, and present Pennsylvania with a grim choice: allow a new tsunami of poisons to contaminate dozens more waterways - or pay tens of millions of dollars a year, every year forever, to control it. "Our streams are in deplorable condition, and they are hardly done paying for the games of the coal companies," State Rep. Camille George (D., Clearfield)
NEWS
November 5, 1999 | By Herb Drill, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
William Montgomery, 93, of Fort Washington, a retired coal company manager who went to work for the Phillies, died Monday. He died at his home at the Fort Washington Estates retirement community after suffering heart-related problems. In 1971, he retired as general credit manager for Westmoreland Coal Co., which had headquarters in Philadelphia. He was a member of the Westmoreland Alumni Club of Philadelphia. Following his retirement, Mr. Montgomery - whose son, David Montgomery, is the Phillies president - worked in the team's Center City ticket office and its spring training complex in Clearwater, Fla. Born in Hatboro, Mr. Montgomery was an Army sergeant during World War II. He was a Fort Washington Estates resident for the last two years and formerly lived at the Gwynedd Estates retirement community in Lower Gwynedd Township for 13 years.
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