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Coal Dust

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NEWS
May 9, 2008 | By Jane M. Von Bergen, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The shearer sliced across the rock of coal in a glorious roar of machinery, coal spitting off the toothed blade, rocks flying in the yellow light of the mining tunnel, hundreds of feet below the surface. This is what I came to report for The Inquirer, how it is that a machine can slice through a solid block of coal six feet high, 1,100 feet wide and 12,000 feet long as if it were mere bologna - the stuff of sandwiches, and not the earth's buried treasure of power. Some of what I had pictured about a coal mine was true in this mine, Consol Energy's Bailey Mine.
NEWS
September 22, 2010
Bell, Calif., leaders charged in scandal LOS ANGELES - The mayor and former city manager of Bell, Calif., were led away Tuesday in handcuffs, charged with six other officials with taking more than $5.5 million from the working-class suburb in a scandal that triggered nationwide outrage. Former City Manager Robert Rizzo, Mayor Oscar Hernandez, and the other current and former city officials were rounded up during morning raids on their homes that prompted many of their neighbors to burst into cheers.
NEWS
November 24, 2012 | By Stephen J. Pytak, POTTSVILLE REPUBLICAN-HERALD
ASHLAND, Pa. - Children were once punished with coal in their Christmas stockings. However, Len S. Kimmel prefers it when people give coal as a gift. Over many years, he has turned coal dust and rice coal - small pieces of anthracite - into jewelry and paperweights shaped like penguins and pigs. "I loved doing it and going out to be a vendor at shows and meeting people," said Kimmel, 79, of Fountain Springs. For more than 15 years, Kimmel has been crafting coal sculptures, using coal dust, rice coal, epoxy, and molds, and selling his work at area malls.
BUSINESS
March 10, 2013 | By Linda Loyd, Inquirer Staff Writer
Kinder Morgan Energy Partners has called off a deal to invest $200.5 million and operate the state-owned Port of Wilmington, citing antagonism from a local longshoreman's union leader. The publicly traded energy company, based in Houston, wanted to expand cargoes, bring new jobs, and invest in needed port infrastructure repairs. The Diamond State Port Corp. in December named Kinder, with operations at Tioga Marine Terminal in Port Richmond and Fairless Hills, Bucks County, as the "preferred" bidder to lease the Wilmington port.
NEWS
April 4, 2012 | By Vicki Smith, Associated Press
MORGANTOWN, W. Va. - Proposed changes to U.S. Department of Labor rules would make it easier for coal miners and their families to obtain black-lung benefits, while a West Virginia congressman aims to reduce the amount of paperwork they have to fill out in the first place. The 2010 Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act - dubbed "Obamacare" by critics - requires the Office of Workers' Compensation Program to reinstate two provisions of the Black Lung Benefits Act that were eliminated in 1981.
NEWS
December 8, 2012 | By Linda Loyd, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The state-owned Port of Wilmington took a step Friday toward a partnership that would see Kinder Morgan Inc., a publicly traded energy company, operate the terminal, expand cargoes, and invest $150 million in needed port infrastructure repairs. The Diamond State Port Corp. named Kinder, based in Houston with operations at Tioga Marine Terminal in Port Richmond and Fairless Hills, Bucks County, as the "preferred" bidder to lease the port. In coming weeks, Kinder will meet with the port's existing customers, including Dole and Chiquita, and by the end of March a "hard" number proposal should be known, the port's chairman, Alan Levin, told a board meeting in New Castle.
NEWS
February 10, 1990 | By Ralph Cipriano, Inquirer Staff Writer
Frank J. Danielewicz, 77, of Laurel Springs, the senior member of three generations of stalwarts in the Polish American String Band, died Wednesday at Cooper Hospital-University Medical Center in Camden. The Danielewicz family's nearly 31-year affiliation with the band began March 11, 1959, the day Mr. Danielewicz's son Raymond turned 14, the minimum age for a Mummer. That day, Mr. Danielewicz and Raymond got in the family's green 1955 Chevy Bel Air and drove across the river to the string band's headquarters in Port Richmond.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
May 26, 2013 | By Edward J. Sozanski, Contributing Art Critic
Like Mother Nature - where would we all be without DNA? - Gertrude Stein was fond of repetition. As she wrote in her novel The Making of Americans , "Repeating is the whole of living and by repeating comes understanding. " Well, I wonder. Or I did until I watched a good portion of a nearly hour-long film called Fase at the Institute of Contemporary Art. The film, by Belgian Thierry De Mey, focuses on two female dancers as they execute a series of synchronized spins and movements that suggest vigorous calisthenics.
BUSINESS
March 10, 2013 | By Linda Loyd, Inquirer Staff Writer
Kinder Morgan Energy Partners has called off a deal to invest $200.5 million and operate the state-owned Port of Wilmington, citing antagonism from a local longshoreman's union leader. The publicly traded energy company, based in Houston, wanted to expand cargoes, bring new jobs, and invest in needed port infrastructure repairs. The Diamond State Port Corp. in December named Kinder, with operations at Tioga Marine Terminal in Port Richmond and Fairless Hills, Bucks County, as the "preferred" bidder to lease the Wilmington port.
BUSINESS
December 10, 2012 | By Linda Loyd, Inquirer Staff Writer
The state-owned Port of Wilmington took a step Friday toward a partnership in which Kinder Morgan Energy Partners Inc., a publicly traded energy company, would operate the terminal, expand cargoes, and invest $150 million in needed port infrastructure repairs. The Diamond State Port Corp. named Kinder, based in Houston with operations at Tioga Marine Terminal in Port Richmond and Fairless Hills, Bucks County, the "preferred" bidder to lease the port. In coming weeks, Kinder will meet with the port's customers, including Dole and Chiquita, and by the end of March, a "hard"-number proposal should be known, the port's chairman, Alan Levin, told a board meeting in New Castle.
NEWS
November 24, 2012 | By Stephen J. Pytak, POTTSVILLE REPUBLICAN-HERALD
ASHLAND, Pa. - Children were once punished with coal in their Christmas stockings. However, Len S. Kimmel prefers it when people give coal as a gift. Over many years, he has turned coal dust and rice coal - small pieces of anthracite - into jewelry and paperweights shaped like penguins and pigs. "I loved doing it and going out to be a vendor at shows and meeting people," said Kimmel, 79, of Fountain Springs. For more than 15 years, Kimmel has been crafting coal sculptures, using coal dust, rice coal, epoxy, and molds, and selling his work at area malls.
NEWS
June 16, 2012 | By Michael Carroll
My father was born a hundred years ago. He went to work before he finished high school. Though he was a smart man, school did not agree with him. But work did. My father did not immediately go to work in the coal mines, but he eventually followed the path that most able-bodied men in town and in his family took at the time. Unlike his own father, he may not have had to. My grandfather had fought the battle before him, skipping his childhood, going to work as a breaker boy when he was 7 or 8, and eventually working his way up to become a boss.
NEWS
April 4, 2012 | By Vicki Smith, Associated Press
MORGANTOWN, W. Va. - Proposed changes to U.S. Department of Labor rules would make it easier for coal miners and their families to obtain black-lung benefits, while a West Virginia congressman aims to reduce the amount of paperwork they have to fill out in the first place. The 2010 Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act - dubbed "Obamacare" by critics - requires the Office of Workers' Compensation Program to reinstate two provisions of the Black Lung Benefits Act that were eliminated in 1981.
NEWS
February 23, 2012 | By Vicki Smith, ASSOCIATED PRESS
CHARLESTON, W.Va. - Federal prosecutors investigating the West Virginia coal mine explosion that killed 29 men are working their way up the corporate ladder with criminal charges. On Wednesday, the former superintendent of the Upper Big Branch mine became the highest-ranking company official charged in the 2010 disaster, and he is apparently cooperating with prosecutors, who said the investigation is far from over. Gary May, 43, was charged with conspiracy to defraud the government, accused among other things of disabling a methane gas monitor, falsifying safety records and using code words to tip off miners underground about surprise inspections.
NEWS
September 22, 2010
Bell, Calif., leaders charged in scandal LOS ANGELES - The mayor and former city manager of Bell, Calif., were led away Tuesday in handcuffs, charged with six other officials with taking more than $5.5 million from the working-class suburb in a scandal that triggered nationwide outrage. Former City Manager Robert Rizzo, Mayor Oscar Hernandez, and the other current and former city officials were rounded up during morning raids on their homes that prompted many of their neighbors to burst into cheers.
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