CollectionsCoal Industry
IN THE NEWS

Coal Industry

FEATURED ARTICLES
BUSINESS
April 11, 2001 | By Akweli Parker INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Like larger-than-life tombstones, the black piles of coal waste on the denuded hillsides that pock northeastern Pennsylvania mark the devastation left by decades of mining. But John W. Rich Jr., entrepreneur and partial heir to a family coal fortune, says his company and its partners will change all that for Schuylkill County, and perhaps for other coal regions across the country. Rich's company, Waste Management & Processors Inc., and its corporate partners are racing to become the first in the United States to build and operate a full-scale, coal-to-liquid-fuel facility.
NEWS
September 19, 2016 | By Thomas Fitzgerald, POLITICS WRITER
WAYNESBURG, Pa. - Jim Popielarcheck's dad was a coal miner for 40 years, and he followed the old man underground. In turn, when it was time, his son J.W. descended into the earth. That's been the story for generations in Greene County, a piece of Appalachia in the farthest southwest corner of Pennsylvania, one of the biggest coal-producing counties in the nation, a point of blue-collar pride. But in a place where houses and settlements cling to the sides of mountains, mist rising from the hollers, the way of life coal has provided, and even the promise of America itself, can feel precarious here in the final weeks before the nation elects a new president.
NEWS
April 22, 2016
By John Hanger Bernie Sanders is airing a new television advertisement titled "Ban Fracking Everywhere," a siren song for the 51 percent of Americans who don't support shale-gas production. But Sanders' fracking ban would paradoxically increase pollution and cause devastating utility bill increases for 400,000 Philadelphians with incomes near or below the poverty line. As concerns about fracking mount, many believe the senator when he thunders that a ban is the right thing to do. In an ideal world, it would be, because gas drilling is an industrial process that cannot be done without causing some damage to the environment.
BUSINESS
July 20, 1988 | By Jeffrey Marx, Inquirer Washington Bureau
The coal industry isn't cheering the drought, but it sees one positive side to the dry, hot conditions afflicting the nation this summer. That weather will contribute to record levels of coal production and consumption in 1988, the National Coal Association said yesterday. In its midyear forecast, the association said U.S. miners will produce 926 million tons of coal this year, up from 917 million in 1987. Coal consumption, including exports, is expected to reach 932 million tons, 15 million more than last year.
NEWS
June 15, 2010 | By George Ellis
Government is not especially good at picking winners in the free market, including in the energy sector. Despite a lot of hoopla and subsidies, for example, corn-based ethanol has proven for the most part to be a nonstarter. On the other hand, entrepreneurs have discovered that recycled cooking oil can be used to fuel vehicles, and many major energy companies are looking at algae as a potential alternative-energy resource. Today, we have state and federal subsidies being poured into solar and wind power, although these may not turn out to be the most practical options (certainly not in every region of the country)
NEWS
November 16, 1986
Listening to his message, it might have been easy to figure Edward B. Leisenring Jr. to be some out-of-place environmentalist as he addressed the Virginia Coal Council recently. He was telling his audience to get behind passage of an acid-rain control bill, legislation that the industry has vigorously opposed in past years. Edward Leisenring isn't some mouthpiece for environmentalists, however. He is the chairman of Westmoreland Coal Co., based in Philadelphia, and that's what makes his message to Eastern coal executives particularly interesting.
BUSINESS
July 8, 1993 | By Andrew Maykuth, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Struggling Westmoreland Coal Co. yesterday lauded an agreement it reached last week with the United Mine Workers of America, saying the new contract would reduce costs for small coal companies and increase competitiveness while protecting union jobs. The Philadelphia mining firm and union representatives hailed the agreement with such enthusiasm that, given the history of labor relations in the coal industry, it was like hearing the Hatfields praise the McCoys. "This contract provides a unique opportunity for labor and management to join in making Westmoreland competitive and returning the company to profitability," said Westmoreland president Christopher K. Seglem.
NEWS
October 19, 1992 | Daily News wire services
LONDON COAL FIRES CRISIS FOR BRITISH PM Prime Minister John Major yesterday called an emergency cabinet meeting for today after plans to close down more than half of Britain's coal industry blew up into the worst crisis of his leadership. The meeting will focus on an escalating revolt in the Conservative Party over plans unveiled last week to ax 31 of state-owned British Coal's 50 pits with the loss of 30,000 miners' jobs. An irony of the furor over Major's plan to shut down the coal mines is that the miners have found an ardent ally in Winston Churchill.
NEWS
February 19, 2010
"MY NAME IS CHARLOTTE," the ad begins. "I work for Sallie Mae to help families go to college and I agree with President Obama. One job lost is too many - especially in Pennsylvania. But my job could be lost because Congress is about to vote on another bill . . . putting Washington in charge of student loans instead of letting local employees do the job. That would cost Pennsylvania hundreds of jobs - maybe even thousands. Visit ProtectPennsylvaniaJobs.com. We're sympathetic to people facing job loss.
NEWS
November 4, 1986 | By Edward Colimore, Inquirer Staff Writer
On the last day of his re-election campaign, U.S. Sen. Arlen Specter crisscrossed the state yesterday in a small plane, making a final pitch to voters in the major media markets through a series of political rallies, endorsements and news conferences. Specter and his wife, City Councilwoman Joan Specter, appeared for rallies at the front gate of the Philadelphia Naval Shipyard in South Philadelphia and in the ornate Capitol Rotunda in Harrisburg. They also visited employees at a manufacturing plant in Erie, and Specter received an endorsement from United Miners Workers president Richard Trumka during a news conference in Pittsburgh.
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
September 19, 2016 | By Thomas Fitzgerald, POLITICS WRITER
WAYNESBURG, Pa. - Jim Popielarcheck's dad was a coal miner for 40 years, and he followed the old man underground. In turn, when it was time, his son J.W. descended into the earth. That's been the story for generations in Greene County, a piece of Appalachia in the farthest southwest corner of Pennsylvania, one of the biggest coal-producing counties in the nation, a point of blue-collar pride. But in a place where houses and settlements cling to the sides of mountains, mist rising from the hollers, the way of life coal has provided, and even the promise of America itself, can feel precarious here in the final weeks before the nation elects a new president.
NEWS
April 23, 2016
The fossil-fuel lobby's desperate defense of the largest source of anthropogenic carbon pollution, coal-fired electricity plants, could choke Pennsylvania's efforts to tailor federal pollution control efforts to the state's needs and take advantage of more promising energy resources. Instead of helping people who depend on coal for power and a living make the transition to cleaner, more sustainable energy sources and jobs, industry leaders are trying to stall President Obama's Clean Power Plan, which aims to reduce carbon dioxide emissions from coal-fired plants to 32 percent below 2005 levels by 2030.
NEWS
April 22, 2016
By John Hanger Bernie Sanders is airing a new television advertisement titled "Ban Fracking Everywhere," a siren song for the 51 percent of Americans who don't support shale-gas production. But Sanders' fracking ban would paradoxically increase pollution and cause devastating utility bill increases for 400,000 Philadelphians with incomes near or below the poverty line. As concerns about fracking mount, many believe the senator when he thunders that a ban is the right thing to do. In an ideal world, it would be, because gas drilling is an industrial process that cannot be done without causing some damage to the environment.
NEWS
January 31, 2016
COLORADO 1 dead in violence at motorcycle expo One person died and six others were injured in a shooting and stabbing at a motorcycle expo Saturday, Denver police said. Police spokeswoman Raquel Lopez said the incident occurred at the National Western Complex, where the Colorado Motorcycle Expo is being held this weekend. Kevin McVaney of Denver Health Medical Center said six people were admitted to the hospital. Three were in critical condition and three were stable, he said.
NEWS
August 15, 2013 | By Thomas Fitzgerald, Inquirer Politics Writer
A paper target with Gov. Corbett's face in the bull's-eye showed up at a Democrats' county-fair booth in southwestern Pennsylvania over the weekend, drawing outrage from state Republicans and condemnation of the imagery from Democratic officials. "Reasonable people can disagree, but creating something like this is just unacceptable," state GOP Chairman Rob Gleason said Tuesday in a statement. He said that his Democratic counterpart, Jim Burn, should denounce the flier, and added that Greene County Democrats owed the governor an apology for "condoning" it. "Think Safety First" is printed beneath the target, between a sketch of a deer and a picture of a turkey with the slogan "Let's Make Him One-Term Tom" pasted next to it. A tom is both a male turkey and the governor's first name.
NEWS
June 28, 2013 | By Sandy Bauers, Inquirer Staff Writer
As the dust settles on President Obama's climate action plan released Tuesday, industry and advocacy groups here are trying to sort out this: How much will it hurt coal, the region's traditional but fading power source? And how much will it boost renewables and nuclear? In both states, a cascade of regulatory blows has forced coal-fired power plants to upgrade, close, or switch to natural gas. In both, two nuclear generators are on the drawing boards. Wind energy has grown in Pennsylvania.
NEWS
June 27, 2013 | By Juliet Eilperin, Washington Post
WASHINGTON - President Obama on Tuesday delivered his most forceful push for action on global warming, declaring that his administration would impose tighter pollution controls on coal- and gas-fired utilities and establish strict conditions for approval of the proposed Keystone XL pipeline. Obama also announced that the government would take climate change into consideration in its everyday operations. The shift could affect decisions on a range of issues, including bridge heights, flood insurance rates, and how the military gets electricity overseas.
NEWS
January 12, 2013 | By Lawrence Messina and John Raby, Associated Press
CHARLESTON, W.Va. - Sen. John D. "Jay" Rockefeller 4th, who came to West Virginia as a young man from one of the world's richest families to work on antipoverty programs and remained in the state to build a political legacy, announced Friday that he will not seek a sixth term. The Democrat's decision comes at a time when his popularity is threatened because of his support for President Obama, who is wildly unpopular in the state, and his willingness to challenge the powerful coal industry, which he said has used divisive, fear-mongering tactics to wrongly blame the federal government for its problems.
BUSINESS
October 28, 2012 | By Andrew Maykuth, Inquirer Staff Writer
WAYNESBURG, Pa. - Not long ago, two things held true in Greene County: Coal ruled, and a Democratic presidential candidate could count on solid voter support. Coal still holds its own. President Obama, not so much. Across mining regions, the Republicans have mounted a relentless campaign blaming the Obama administration's environmental policies for a decline in coal demand. It has struck a chord in Greene County, judging from the ubiquitous yard signs: "Stop the War on Coal - Fire Obama.
NEWS
December 29, 2011
W E WONDER: Do the people who oppose the new standards for mercury and other toxic emissions from coal-fired power plants believe that their children are somehow immune from the birth defects and lower IQs caused by these poisons? (We also wonder if they think that somehow they can partition off their own little section of the atmosphere to breathe - or somehow find a haven from global warming-induced hurricanes, tornadoes and tsunamis. But let's just stick with mercury - and arsenic, chromium, nickel and acid gases - for today.)
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
|
|
|
|
|