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FOOD
July 25, 1990 | By Bonnie Tandy Leblang and Carolyn Wyman, Special to the Daily News
NATURAL POP POPCORN ON THE COB. $2.29 to $2.99 per box with three ears. BONNIE: Here's a new natural item - corn on the cob ready to be popped in the microwave oven. This is popped corn, grown just for popping, just as other corn is grown for eating, feed or decoration. Most microwave popcorns are high in fat, sodium and calories. Not Natural Pop. It uses no salt and needs no oil, making it healthier than most. Natural Pop works without oil because when the cob is heated in the microwave oven, it acts as a heat receptor, warming the moisture in the kernels until it turns to steam and pops the corn.
FOOD
July 23, 2000 | By Maria Gallagher, FOR THE INQUIRER
What: Kernel Kutter Manufacturer: Kernel Kutter Inc. Where: Kitchen & Co., Christiana, Del. Price: $5.99 What: Corn Stripper Manufacturer: Made in China for Fox Run Craftsmen Price: $3.49 These tools both have a sharp, circular, sawtooth cutter at their center, designed to strip kernels from a corncob. The test. Both tools were awkward to use. They got stuck on thick ears, cooked or raw. They could cut all the way through if two hands were used to push down hard on the long handles.
FOOD
September 14, 1988 | By Andrew Schloss, Special to The Inquirer
Only a true believer could cherish this year's crop. Peeking and poking at puny ears with kernels more sunken than swollen, we sought the sweetness of seasons past. Occasionally we found it - a husk, huskier than the rest, a tuft of silk, more silken than the competition, and an ear that beat the odds. Despite endless months of drought, ignoring corn worms, beetles and borers, it thrived. In one of the worst corn harvests in a decade, good corn still managed to make it to market.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 13, 2013 | By Virginia A. Smith, Inquirer Staff Writer
When Cara Graver was growing up in Malvern, that part of the world was a lot more countrified and backyard chickens were definitely not considered divas. "They lived in a concrete block building, nothing fancy," says Graver, 66, a potter who had a similarly boring coop at her wooded home in Chester Springs, Chester County - until 2011, when you might say opportunity fell. A tree crashed on top of the old chicken house, and Graver lost no time replacing it with a round, adobelike coop that looks like it belongs in the desert or a glossy magazine.
NEWS
July 19, 2013
WE'VE PUT men on the moon but have yet to come up with a perfect corn de-kerneler, one that cleans a freshly shucked cob without shooting kernels all over the kitchen. Sure, there are at least a dozen clever implements (variously called strippers, kernelers, zippers, cutters and peelers) designed to do the job. None seem to work as well as a sharp knife and steady hand. And that has its own problems: Holding that cob upright and still while cutting off the kernels can be a challenge.
NEWS
October 17, 1993
PHILS' FAVORITE CHILDHOOD FODDER Larry Andersen: pudding cake. Lenny Dykstra: macaroni and cheese. Dave Hollins: pizza and wings. Pete Incaviglia: Italian sausage sandwich. John Kruk: cheeseburger. Curt Schilling: hot dogs. Mitch Williams: corn on the cob. -- From the Phillies 1993 Yearbook
NEWS
April 9, 1992 | By Carmela Thomas, SPECIAL TO THE INQUIRER
"My favorite thing I used to do with my father was boxing," Blair said wistfully. "He would get on his knees in the dining room. We had two pairs of gloves. " More than three years after the death of his father, Blair Johnson, 10, of Wyncote, is able to discuss many of the activities he and his father experienced together without shedding tears. But his mother, Deborah Johnson, said it wasn't always so. "His father was involved in every part of his life," Johnson said.
NEWS
July 19, 2013 | BY JUDY HEVRDEJS, McClatchy News Service
INDULGE your appetite for sweet corn by shopping farmers markets, roadside stands and local grocers for freshly picked ears, then crunching your way around cob after cob after cob. While a rainy spring hampered planting, the corn harvest began in Lancaster County the third week of June, according to the Pennsylvania Vegetable Marketing & Research Program, in Harrisburg. Across the Delaware, New Jersey's Department of Agriculture said record-breaking warm spring weather brought in the corn (and tomatoes)
NEWS
April 9, 1988 | By Lesley Valdes, Inquirer Music Critic
That British conductor Simon Rattle has a keen musical intelligence and youthful charisma has long been recognized from his guest conducting stints on this side of the Atlantic as well as from the many excellent recordings he has produced with the City of Birmingham Symphony Orchestra. Just how satisfying the COB, which he has steered with singular allegiance for the last eight years, would sound in person has been an open question, since the orchestra has never in its 68-year-history ventured onto a U.S. stage.
FOOD
August 27, 1986 | By RUTH CESTA, Special to the Daily News
What's more American than a hot dog or even Mom's apple pie? Corn. Succulent sweet corn on the cob, dripping with melted butter. Piping hot cornbread. Handfuls of popcorn. Buttered hominy. Cool, tangy corn relish, or a hearty soup made from golden corn kernels. And now's the time to enjoy the peak of the corn season and stock up on this delicious crop for winter dishes made with corn fresh from the freezer. Right now markets are stocked with fresh corn, ready to be enjoyed now or frozen for use later when local farmers' crops are finished for the season.
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NEWS
July 19, 2013
WE'VE PUT men on the moon but have yet to come up with a perfect corn de-kerneler, one that cleans a freshly shucked cob without shooting kernels all over the kitchen. Sure, there are at least a dozen clever implements (variously called strippers, kernelers, zippers, cutters and peelers) designed to do the job. None seem to work as well as a sharp knife and steady hand. And that has its own problems: Holding that cob upright and still while cutting off the kernels can be a challenge.
NEWS
July 19, 2013 | BY JUDY HEVRDEJS, McClatchy News Service
INDULGE your appetite for sweet corn by shopping farmers markets, roadside stands and local grocers for freshly picked ears, then crunching your way around cob after cob after cob. While a rainy spring hampered planting, the corn harvest began in Lancaster County the third week of June, according to the Pennsylvania Vegetable Marketing & Research Program, in Harrisburg. Across the Delaware, New Jersey's Department of Agriculture said record-breaking warm spring weather brought in the corn (and tomatoes)
ENTERTAINMENT
April 13, 2013 | By Virginia A. Smith, Inquirer Staff Writer
When Cara Graver was growing up in Malvern, that part of the world was a lot more countrified and backyard chickens were definitely not considered divas. "They lived in a concrete block building, nothing fancy," says Graver, 66, a potter who had a similarly boring coop at her wooded home in Chester Springs, Chester County - until 2011, when you might say opportunity fell. A tree crashed on top of the old chicken house, and Graver lost no time replacing it with a round, adobelike coop that looks like it belongs in the desert or a glossy magazine.
FOOD
July 23, 2000 | By Maria Gallagher, FOR THE INQUIRER
What: Kernel Kutter Manufacturer: Kernel Kutter Inc. Where: Kitchen & Co., Christiana, Del. Price: $5.99 What: Corn Stripper Manufacturer: Made in China for Fox Run Craftsmen Price: $3.49 These tools both have a sharp, circular, sawtooth cutter at their center, designed to strip kernels from a corncob. The test. Both tools were awkward to use. They got stuck on thick ears, cooked or raw. They could cut all the way through if two hands were used to push down hard on the long handles.
FOOD
August 27, 1997 | By Marilynn Marter, INQUIRER FOOD WRITER
Labor Day may mark the traditional end of summer, but it feels more like midseason right now. In part, that's because it's not summer in this city until the local corn and tomatoes come in. And corn especially was late for its usual early-July debut. Jenifer Foy has the advantage of living in the midst of corn fields a few miles from her Doylestown restaurant, the State Street Cafe, and that gives her first dibs on the crop. But it didn't help much when near-drought conditions pushed off the corn harvest.
FOOD
September 4, 1994 | By Mary Carroll, FOR THE INQUIRER
September is the prime month when most of the 200 varieties of corn grown in the United States are ripe for the picking. After my family has enjoyed all the boiled, steamed and grilled corn on the cob we can, I start using corn in end-of-summer salads. A cooking friend in Arizona was my inspiration for this. Each year she heralded in Indian summer with a bowl of corn salad made the way that the Hopis might have, with bright peppers and a tangy dressing. Such salads are ideal for proper nutrition and weight management.
NEWS
October 17, 1993
PHILS' FAVORITE CHILDHOOD FODDER Larry Andersen: pudding cake. Lenny Dykstra: macaroni and cheese. Dave Hollins: pizza and wings. Pete Incaviglia: Italian sausage sandwich. John Kruk: cheeseburger. Curt Schilling: hot dogs. Mitch Williams: corn on the cob. -- From the Phillies 1993 Yearbook
FOOD
August 11, 1993 | by Barbara Gibbons, Special to the Daily News
If you ask "What's your favorite vegetable?" and don't insist that it be something green, a common answer will be corn - especially this time of year, when sweet, flavorful locally grown corn is piled high at produce stands, pittance-priced. Such an abundance leads to leftovers. (Or it least it should! You can't possibly consume another ear, can you?) In the past, corn leftovers generally found their way into fritters and corn muffins. Today's creative cooks are using corn in lots of exciting new ways, in savory salsas and sauces, combined with rice and other grains as pilaf, mixed with beans or pasta in chilled salads, as relishes, fillings and toppings.
NEWS
April 9, 1992 | By Carmela Thomas, SPECIAL TO THE INQUIRER
"My favorite thing I used to do with my father was boxing," Blair said wistfully. "He would get on his knees in the dining room. We had two pairs of gloves. " More than three years after the death of his father, Blair Johnson, 10, of Wyncote, is able to discuss many of the activities he and his father experienced together without shedding tears. But his mother, Deborah Johnson, said it wasn't always so. "His father was involved in every part of his life," Johnson said.
NEWS
September 12, 1991 | By Jeff McGaw, Special to The Inquirer
For 17 years, David Dougherty felt like he had a sneaker in his mouth. That's because for 17 years, starting with the removal by car door of his two front teeth, Dougherty wore dentures - false teeth that made smiling an adventure in humility and eating certain foods a near-impossibility. For Dougherty, one of the 110 million Americans estimated to be at least partly toothless, the "Festival of Formerly Forbidden Foods" Saturday at the Glendower Farms estate of Thomas Balshi, a Fort Washington prosthodontist, was a special occasion.
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