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FOOD
October 15, 1986 | By SONJA HEINZE, Special to the Daily News
Q. I have been feeding a stray cat that stays in my garage. I read the ingredients in cat food and they are sickening. One of them is cobalt. Isn't cobalt used in X-rays, and isn't this a cancer-causing substance? B. Bernstein Wheeling, Ill. A. The director of pet food product development, L.G. Miller, Ph.D., of Calreco, Inc., manufacturers of Fancy Feast cat food, explains that there are nine forms of cobalt. Each of the nine forms has a different weight. The form of cobalt that is used in cat food has a mass of 59. The radioactive form of cobalt used in diagnostic procedures, such as X-rays, has a mass of 60. Cobalt-60 is indeed radioactive, but cobalt-59 is not. Cobalt-59 is the natural form of cobalt.
NEWS
September 23, 2003 | By Walter F. Naedele INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Milford Township Manager Jeffrey Vey told Bucks County Court yesterday that "it is highly improbable that [a nuclear accident] will occur" at the cobalt 60 irradiator in his town. Vey said no such accident is likely at CFC Logistics, "even with human intervention" from terrorists. "It is my belief that if the irradiator goes into operation . . . it will be operated safely. " CFC has said it intends to use the irradiator, which uses cobalt that emits gamma rays, to cleanse food and other substances.
NEWS
June 13, 2011 | By Mitchell Hecht, For The Inquirer
Question: My orthopedist recently told me that the DePuy right hip replacement that I received a couple of years ago is being recalled because of defective components. My orthopedist had me check a blood level for cobalt, which was abnormally high at 12. Although my new hip feels fine, the doctor says it needs to come out and be replaced again. I'm very upset. What will cobalt toxicity do to me? So far, all I seem to have is an unexplained itchy leg rash for one year, which I think is from the hip. Answer: Your DePuy ASR prosthetic hip is defective, breaking down its alloy components into tiny flakes of cobalt and chromium, which have entered the surrounding tissues and your bloodstream.
NEWS
May 9, 1997 | By Andrew Maykuth, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER Peter Slevin of the Inquirer Washington bureau contributed to this article
The wealth that financed President Mobutu Sese Seko's vast system of patronage and larceny came from places like Likasi, where copper and cobalt are refined in a smoky industrial complex on the edge of town. The theft of metal from the state-owned Gecamines metallurgical works was so pervasive that the company once called in the Zairean army to guard its warehouse. It was like inviting a cat to watch a parakeet. "The thefts only increased," said a Gecamines official who spoke under condition of anonymity.
NEWS
February 10, 1993 | Daily News wire services
THE HAGUE EUTHANASIA DOCS NO LONGER LIABLE The Netherlands adopted the most liberal euthanasia guidelines in Europe yesterday after years of keeping the widely accepted Dutch practice in legal limbo. Although the legislation approved by parliament stops short of legalization, it guarantees physicians immunity from prosecution if they follow strict guidelines for mercy killing. The compromise was an attempt to placate right-to-lifers opposed to repealing the ban on euthanasia entirely, while giving legal protection to physicians performing the mercy killings.
NEWS
October 22, 1987 | By LEON TAYLOR, Daily News Staff Writer (Staff writer Tom Cooney contributed to this report.)
A radioactive construction gauge that had been stolen from a car parked in Center City the day before was found yesterday at the corner of 12th and Carpenter streets in South Philadelphia. John King, of 13th Street near Carpenter, told police he saw an orange metal suitcase containing the gauge and recalled news accounts about the theft. Police cordoned off the area until representatives of the Materials Engineering Testing Co. of Berlin, N.J., which owns the gauge, arrived to claim it. The outside of the suitcase had been damaged, but the gauge, used for measuring moisture and density of construction materials, hadn't been tampered with, police said.
NEWS
May 16, 1997 | by Theresa Conroy and Al Hunter Jr., Daily News Staff Writers
The weather has finally broken, and Philly's nightlife and shopping districts beckon. From Delaware Avenue to South Street to Manayunk, new stores and venues have opened for partyers, shoppers and eaters. The newly landscaped Delaware Avenue "strip" is the home of two new clubs, Cobalt and the Baja Beach Club. Other clubs, like Rock Lobster, have gone through the annual ritual of revamping their menus. Over in Manayunk, an entertainment complex, new eateries and unusual shops have squeezed onto Main Street.
NEWS
April 13, 1991 | By David Iams, Inquirer Staff Writer
A two-day estate sale on the Main Line next weekend will offer bidders the chance to get items that once belonged to one of the most prominent families in the area, the Rushes. It is one of two sales that will begin next Saturday and run through the following day. The Main Line estate sale will be conducted by the Charles A. Whitaker Auction Co., starting at 10 a.m. next Saturday, at Sydenham, a 40-acre farm in Paoli that belonged to the late Deborah Norris Rush. In addition to 18th- and 19th-century furniture, silver, prints and paintings and textiles, many of them imported, the sale will include items from the Biddle and Brock families, to which Mrs. Rush was related.
LIVING
February 6, 2004 | By Diane Goldsmith INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
"Vroom, vroom," revved the blender, as the needle on its tachometer leaped to the right. A tachometer? On a blender? "It's been written up in the auto trades," said Cheryl Slavinsky, who was demonstrating Harrisburg manufacturer L'Equip's sleek, industrial-looking R.P.M. Blender. Part blender, part hot rod, it certainly wasn't the only manly gizmo at a media preview last week of new and soon-to-debut housewares - a peek at what's to come at the International Housewares Association's big March trade show in Chicago.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 2, 2007 | By Steven Rea INQUIRER MOVIE CRITIC
When news of a planned new Sleuth hit Hollywood a year or so ago, it sounded promising: Kenneth Branagh directing a Harold Pinter-revamped version of the Anthony Shaffer play, a play made into a satisfying film back in the early 1970s starring Michael Caine and Sir Laurence Olivier. In this new version, Caine would return to play the Olivier part - a nasty-tempered mystery scribe exacting revenge on the young bloke who has stolen away his wife. And Jude Law would play that part, a ne'er-do-well lover-boy.
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NEWS
June 13, 2011 | By Mitchell Hecht, For The Inquirer
Question: My orthopedist recently told me that the DePuy right hip replacement that I received a couple of years ago is being recalled because of defective components. My orthopedist had me check a blood level for cobalt, which was abnormally high at 12. Although my new hip feels fine, the doctor says it needs to come out and be replaced again. I'm very upset. What will cobalt toxicity do to me? So far, all I seem to have is an unexplained itchy leg rash for one year, which I think is from the hip. Answer: Your DePuy ASR prosthetic hip is defective, breaking down its alloy components into tiny flakes of cobalt and chromium, which have entered the surrounding tissues and your bloodstream.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 2, 2007 | By Steven Rea INQUIRER MOVIE CRITIC
When news of a planned new Sleuth hit Hollywood a year or so ago, it sounded promising: Kenneth Branagh directing a Harold Pinter-revamped version of the Anthony Shaffer play, a play made into a satisfying film back in the early 1970s starring Michael Caine and Sir Laurence Olivier. In this new version, Caine would return to play the Olivier part - a nasty-tempered mystery scribe exacting revenge on the young bloke who has stolen away his wife. And Jude Law would play that part, a ne'er-do-well lover-boy.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 2, 2007 | By Steven Rea, Inquirer Movie Critic
When news of a planned new Sleuth hit Hollywood a year or so ago, it sounded promising: Kenneth Branagh directing a Harold Pinter-revamped version of the Anthony Shaffer play, a play made into a satisfying film back in the early 1970s starring Michael Caine and Sir Laurence Olivier. In this new version, Caine would return to play the Olivier part - a nasty-tempered mystery scribe exacting revenge on the young bloke who has stolen away his wife. And Jude Law would play that part, a ne'er-do-well lover-boy.
LIVING
February 6, 2004 | By Diane Goldsmith INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
"Vroom, vroom," revved the blender, as the needle on its tachometer leaped to the right. A tachometer? On a blender? "It's been written up in the auto trades," said Cheryl Slavinsky, who was demonstrating Harrisburg manufacturer L'Equip's sleek, industrial-looking R.P.M. Blender. Part blender, part hot rod, it certainly wasn't the only manly gizmo at a media preview last week of new and soon-to-debut housewares - a peek at what's to come at the International Housewares Association's big March trade show in Chicago.
NEWS
September 23, 2003 | By Walter F. Naedele INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Milford Township Manager Jeffrey Vey told Bucks County Court yesterday that "it is highly improbable that [a nuclear accident] will occur" at the cobalt 60 irradiator in his town. Vey said no such accident is likely at CFC Logistics, "even with human intervention" from terrorists. "It is my belief that if the irradiator goes into operation . . . it will be operated safely. " CFC has said it intends to use the irradiator, which uses cobalt that emits gamma rays, to cleanse food and other substances.
LIVING
June 27, 1997 | By Elaine Markoutsas, FOR THE INQUIRER
Grab your sunglasses. Brights are back. Mango and tangerine make bold statements next to strawberry or electric grape, and citrus shades of lemon and lime are electrifying side by side with cobalt blue and turquoise. In short, fruity hues are juicing up the home fashion scene just as they're adding sparkle to apparel. And the trend isn't restricted to walls, fabrics and furnishings. Sassy solids and perky patterns are coloring utilitarian objects such as toothbrushes, razors, scissors, tape dispensers, plastic storage containers, dinnerware and candlestick holders.
NEWS
May 16, 1997 | by Theresa Conroy and Al Hunter Jr., Daily News Staff Writers
The weather has finally broken, and Philly's nightlife and shopping districts beckon. From Delaware Avenue to South Street to Manayunk, new stores and venues have opened for partyers, shoppers and eaters. The newly landscaped Delaware Avenue "strip" is the home of two new clubs, Cobalt and the Baja Beach Club. Other clubs, like Rock Lobster, have gone through the annual ritual of revamping their menus. Over in Manayunk, an entertainment complex, new eateries and unusual shops have squeezed onto Main Street.
NEWS
May 9, 1997 | By Andrew Maykuth, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER Peter Slevin of the Inquirer Washington bureau contributed to this article
The wealth that financed President Mobutu Sese Seko's vast system of patronage and larceny came from places like Likasi, where copper and cobalt are refined in a smoky industrial complex on the edge of town. The theft of metal from the state-owned Gecamines metallurgical works was so pervasive that the company once called in the Zairean army to guard its warehouse. It was like inviting a cat to watch a parakeet. "The thefts only increased," said a Gecamines official who spoke under condition of anonymity.
NEWS
November 2, 1995 | By Richard V. Sabatini, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Members of the Philadelphia police bomb squad used high-pressure water yesterday to render harmless a pipe bomb discovered inside a U.S. mail collection box here. "It was the real thing," said Ordnance Disposal Unit Officer Thomas Lynch, after he used the "water cannon" to break apart the 6-by-1 1/2-inch bomb made out of white PVC pipe. The device was discovered about 2:15 p.m. in Levittown's Cobalt Ridge section. Mail carrier Kevin Lewis, 32, of Levittown, made the discovery as he began emptying the box at Cobalt Ridge Drive South and Cardinal Road.
NEWS
February 10, 1993 | Daily News wire services
THE HAGUE EUTHANASIA DOCS NO LONGER LIABLE The Netherlands adopted the most liberal euthanasia guidelines in Europe yesterday after years of keeping the widely accepted Dutch practice in legal limbo. Although the legislation approved by parliament stops short of legalization, it guarantees physicians immunity from prosecution if they follow strict guidelines for mercy killing. The compromise was an attempt to placate right-to-lifers opposed to repealing the ban on euthanasia entirely, while giving legal protection to physicians performing the mercy killings.
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