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Coconut Oil

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ENTERTAINMENT
April 21, 2011 | By Maria Zankey, mankeym@phillynews.com 215-854-5444
DON'T FEEL too guilty as you crack open that coconut-cream Easter egg, though you might want to save half for later. After nearly two decades of being considered "forbidden" in a healthy diet, coconut and products made with it are being viewed in a new light by some scientists, health nuts and chefs. Coconut - be it oil, meat, water or milk - has gone from being a cholesterol criminal to an antiviral, antimicrobial and antifungal "super food. " Monica Glass, dessert chef at 10 Arts Bistro & Lounge by Eric Ripert in the Ritz-Carlton, said she inadvertently stumbled upon coconut oil as a potential cooking fat when Googling cholesterol-friendly recipes about two years ago. "Coconut oil was showing up in a lot of gluten-free recipes," the West Chester native said.
FOOD
June 1, 1994 | By Marilynn Marter, INQUIRER FOOD WRITER
A month ago, roughly 70 percent of movie theaters nationwide were still making popcorn, as they had for decades, with coconut oil. Today, all but one major chain and some stragglers have stopped using coconut oil. And that one chain, United Artists Theaters, says it is offering an air-popped popcorn option along with its traditional coconut-oil-popped corn. Some cinemas, such as the Ritz theaters here and the General Cinema chain, have been using canola oil for years. The problem with coconut oil, in case you missed the recent popcorn brouhaha, is that it is 86 percent saturated.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 19, 2011
GREEN JUICE 2 cucumbers 1/2 cup celery stock 1 apple 1 handful spinach 1/2 bunch parsley 1/2 each, peeled lemon and lime 1 inch peeled ginger Blend until smooth. Makes one serving. SWEET POTATO PASTA 1 or 2 sweet potatoes 1/4 cup chopped spring onions 1/4 cup chopped parsley 1/4 cup chopped basil 1/4 cup diced sundried tomato 1/4 cup chopped raw black olives 1 teaspoon lemon zest and juice 1 teaspoon olive oil Salt and pepper to taste Cut the raw sweet potato into spirals.
FOOD
October 1, 1986 | By SONJA HEINZE, Special to the Daily News
Q. What kind of oil do movie theaters use for their popcorn? The theater I go to says "Butter-Flavored. " Pat Goodman Oakland, Calif. A. Whenever anything is labeled "butter-flavored," it means it's artificially flavored to taste like butter, but isn't really butter at all. Of the four theaters that I personally surveyed, three of them used a product called Durkee's Liquid Dress-All, which is a soybean oil, described as an artificial butter-flavored...
FOOD
August 7, 1991 | by Bonnie Tandy Leblang and Carolyn Wyman, Special to the Daily News
Tanimura & Antle Broccoflower. $.79 to $2.49 a head. Bonnie: On vacation in Holland, the president of a produce company noticed a green plant in a cauliflower field. He brought the seed of that old European plant back to the states and started growing it. That was the start of broccoflower - a member of the cabbage family that's a natural hybrid between broccoli and cauliflower. It's higher in vitamin C and folic acid than either broccoli or cauliflower and will last longer in your refrigerator.
NEWS
December 19, 2014
K ENNETH OKUGBENI, 32, of South Philadelphia, is founder of Lafiya Foods. The firm, which makes natural and organic foods and personal-care products, connects small farmers and co-ops in West Africa with American consumers. Lafiya donates 2 percent of gross sales to community-development programs in health care, education and sustainable agriculture in Ghana. Q: How'd you come up with the idea for Lafiya? A: I have a background in finance. I saw a disconnect between African farmers and American consumers who wanted to lead healthy lives and use organic and natural products.
FOOD
June 10, 1987 | By BARBARA GIBBONS, Special to the Daily News
If you've been avoiding salt and coffee, filling up on complex carbs and polyunsaturated vegetable oils - all in the name of health - the newest nutrition news has some surprises in store. Here are the latest findings from the nation's medical and dietetic journals: Low-Salt Diets: They may not lower blood pressure, according to research in the British Medical Journal. A review of 13 trials showed that the pressure- lowering effect of limiting sodium was small and worked only on systolic blood pressure.
FOOD
January 25, 1989 | By Marilynn Marter, Inquirer Food Writer
Do coconut oil, palm oil, beef tallow or lard whet your appetite? Not likely. How about Nabisco's Oreos or Brown Edge Wafers, or Betty Crocker's blueberry streusel muffins? Maybe Keebler Club crackers or Sunshine's Hydrox cookies are more to your taste. Probably wouldn't think twice about munching one of those treats, right? Yet each is made with one or more heavily saturated fats - coconut oil, palm oil, palm kernel oil, beef tallow or lard. And eating saturated fats, research shows, raises cholesterol and increases the risk of heart disease.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 5, 2014
PHILLY is increasingly known as a vegan-forward town, with places in most neighborhoods where you can enjoy an animal-free dinner or lunch. But what about breakfast? Recently, a friend staying in town overnight asked for a good weekday vegan breakfast spot, and I was stumped. Partly that's because I tend to be at my house at breakfast time, and partly it's because breakfast flies under the radar: You don't think about it that much until you really need it. I posed the question on the Web and got some great info from fellow vegans and "vegan-friendlies.
NEWS
February 12, 2014 | By Jan Hefler, Inquirer Staff Writer
Tina DeSilvio is so determined to give her teenage daughter marijuana, she is mixing cannabis buds with 180-proof alcohol and letting the concoction evaporate into a sticky, olive-green substance to add to coconut oil. Jenna, 14, cannot smoke marijuana, but she can swallow a half-milliliter of the oil - a few drops - when it is stirred into applesauce or yogurt four times a day. "Don't I sound like the mother of the year?" DeSilvio asks, chuckling. Her yellow kitchen counter displays a minutely calibrated scale, a dropper, a 9- by 11-inch glass baking dish, and a clear, tightly sealed plastic container of pungent medical marijuana.
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NEWS
December 19, 2014
K ENNETH OKUGBENI, 32, of South Philadelphia, is founder of Lafiya Foods. The firm, which makes natural and organic foods and personal-care products, connects small farmers and co-ops in West Africa with American consumers. Lafiya donates 2 percent of gross sales to community-development programs in health care, education and sustainable agriculture in Ghana. Q: How'd you come up with the idea for Lafiya? A: I have a background in finance. I saw a disconnect between African farmers and American consumers who wanted to lead healthy lives and use organic and natural products.
NEWS
October 3, 2014
A NUTRITIONIST as well as a food-allergy sufferer, Allison Lubert has had a big impact on "restrictive" eating around Broad and South for the past four years, since the first Sweet Freedom Bakery opened there, with delicacies free of gluten, eggs, dairy, soy, corn, peanuts and refined sugar. Now, after opening additional locations in Collingswood and Bryn Mawr, she'll share her innovative recipes in Baking You Happy: Gluten-Free Recipes from Sweet Freedom Bakery , coming this month from Peter Pauper Press . Here are highlights from my phone chat with her. Q: For a long time, it seemed you felt proprietary about the recipes you'd developed.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 5, 2014
PHILLY is increasingly known as a vegan-forward town, with places in most neighborhoods where you can enjoy an animal-free dinner or lunch. But what about breakfast? Recently, a friend staying in town overnight asked for a good weekday vegan breakfast spot, and I was stumped. Partly that's because I tend to be at my house at breakfast time, and partly it's because breakfast flies under the radar: You don't think about it that much until you really need it. I posed the question on the Web and got some great info from fellow vegans and "vegan-friendlies.
NEWS
February 12, 2014 | By Jan Hefler, Inquirer Staff Writer
Tina DeSilvio is so determined to give her teenage daughter marijuana, she is mixing cannabis buds with 180-proof alcohol and letting the concoction evaporate into a sticky, olive-green substance to add to coconut oil. Jenna, 14, cannot smoke marijuana, but she can swallow a half-milliliter of the oil - a few drops - when it is stirred into applesauce or yogurt four times a day. "Don't I sound like the mother of the year?" DeSilvio asks, chuckling. Her yellow kitchen counter displays a minutely calibrated scale, a dropper, a 9- by 11-inch glass baking dish, and a clear, tightly sealed plastic container of pungent medical marijuana.
FOOD
January 4, 2013 | By Elisa Ludwig, For The Inquirer
There's no diet, it seems, without sacrifice, and a roundup of the year's diet books shows that most of the trending approaches to weight loss eschew at least one or more category of food altogether. Paleo, wheat-/gluten-free, and plant-based-diet books are the hottest categories now, promising well-being in addition to roomier pants, if you are willing to limit yourself to either hunks of meat and coconut oil or millet salads. In a totally different camp are the whole-foods proponents, whose reasoned pleas for variety are starting to sound like a cultural consensus.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 19, 2011
GREEN JUICE 2 cucumbers 1/2 cup celery stock 1 apple 1 handful spinach 1/2 bunch parsley 1/2 each, peeled lemon and lime 1 inch peeled ginger Blend until smooth. Makes one serving. SWEET POTATO PASTA 1 or 2 sweet potatoes 1/4 cup chopped spring onions 1/4 cup chopped parsley 1/4 cup chopped basil 1/4 cup diced sundried tomato 1/4 cup chopped raw black olives 1 teaspoon lemon zest and juice 1 teaspoon olive oil Salt and pepper to taste Cut the raw sweet potato into spirals.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 21, 2011
COCONUT OIL CARROT CAKE 2 cups sugar 1 cup extra-virgin coconut oil, melted 4 eggs 1 1/2 cups all-purpose flour 1/2 cup coconut flour 1 teaspoon baking powder 1 1/2 teaspoon baking soda 1 1/2 teaspoon salt 2 teaspoons cinnamon 1/2 teaspoon nutmeg 1/2 teaspoon mace 1/2 teaspoon ginger 4 cups finely grated carrots 2 cups finely grated apples, preferably Granny...
ENTERTAINMENT
April 21, 2011 | By Maria Zankey, mankeym@phillynews.com 215-854-5444
DON'T FEEL too guilty as you crack open that coconut-cream Easter egg, though you might want to save half for later. After nearly two decades of being considered "forbidden" in a healthy diet, coconut and products made with it are being viewed in a new light by some scientists, health nuts and chefs. Coconut - be it oil, meat, water or milk - has gone from being a cholesterol criminal to an antiviral, antimicrobial and antifungal "super food. " Monica Glass, dessert chef at 10 Arts Bistro & Lounge by Eric Ripert in the Ritz-Carlton, said she inadvertently stumbled upon coconut oil as a potential cooking fat when Googling cholesterol-friendly recipes about two years ago. "Coconut oil was showing up in a lot of gluten-free recipes," the West Chester native said.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 30, 2008 | By Rick Nichols, Inquirer Columnist
In a red stucco building along the rail siding at the edge of Kennett Square recently, Bob Bada was hand-packing his latest batch of Gelati di Capri, slamming each half-filled pint on the stainless steel table to burp out the air, creating a racket - like goats doing flamenco. This is Bada's newest venture, two years now in the refining (though he's still not taking a salary), finally getting traction - in the freezers in two Whole Foods Markets in Philadelphia, and in health-food stores from Kimberton to his sentimental favorite, Spring Run Natural Foods, his first customer, in Kennett Square.
FOOD
July 27, 1994 | Daily News Wire Services
Blame it on nachos. And guacamole. Not to mention cheese-smothered burritos. Mexican food, as we know it, is high in fat. The reason: The American idea of Mexican food is processed cheese on a taco chip. "Some food you get in some Mexican restaurants is fatty, that's true, but a lot of the food that passes for Mexican is really Tex-Mex" which often relies on deep-fat frying, says Dudley Nieto, chef at Lindas Margaritas in Chicago. "Real Mexican food doesn't rely on fat for flavor.
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