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Code Names

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NEWS
June 24, 1988 | By Doreen Carvajal, Inquirer Washington Bureau
To Secret Service agents, "Pontiac" is the terse code word for candidate Jesse Jackson that crackles in their radio earpieces. To folklore expert Alan Dundes, "Pontiac" is a slur - the punch line to a series of racist jokes collected by his students at the University of California at Berkeley. To Jackson campaign staff members, who cannot find out why the Secret Service tagged their candidate with the code, "Pontiac" is a suspicious coincidence. All candidates and major public officials protected by the Secret Service are assigned code names, which appear to reflect some personal attribute, such as President Reagan's cowboy-style code, "Rawhide.
NEWS
May 5, 2011 | By Susan Montoya Bryan, Associated Press
Geronimo was a legendary Apache warrior whose purported ability to walk without leaving footprints allowed him to evade thousands of Mexican and U.S. soldiers, much like Osama bin Laden evaded capture for the last decade. But for American Indians, there's an important difference: Geronimo was a hero - not a terrorist. So to them, the U.S. military's use of the revered leader's moniker as a code name for bin Laden was appalling - a slap in the face that prompted statements of disapproval from tribal leaders, a flurry of angry comments on social-network sites, and a letter from the leader of Geronimo's tribe asking President Obama to apologize.
NEWS
January 7, 2010 | By GLORIA CAMPISI & CHRISTINE OLLEY, campisg@phillynews.com 215-854-5935
The Philadelphia NAACP says in a federal lawsuit filed against US Airways that the airline generally assigned its African-American employees to areas in Philadelphia International Airport that were given code names such as "Compton," "Camden" and "The Ghetto. " The suit, filed Tuesday by attorneys Brian and David Mildenberg, alleges racial discrimination and segregation against the airline's African-American employees and was filed on behalf of three former workers. "Each of our clients has explained that they were demoralized by their working experience with US Airways as a result of the practices described in the complaint," said Brian Mildenberg.
NEWS
August 4, 1995 | By Kyle York Spencer, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Majik is five feet tall, 13, and bored. He calls himself a tagger. He said he knew it was illegal to spray-paint his nickname on bridges, buildings and tractor-trailers. "But, dude, not that illegal," he said. Still, it's illegal enough for him to have been slapped with a fine, an invitation to court, and the prospect of spending the month cleaning the walls he and his buddies have scrawled on. Majik is one of at least eight borough teenagers - with code names like "Crazy," "Action," "UK77," "Think" and "Lucky" - who have slyly cruised the hilly streets with spray cans in their knapsacks and tagging on their minds.
NEWS
June 24, 1988 | Daily News Wire Services
The Secret Service's code word for Jesse Jackson - "Pontiac" is an acronym for a racist slur, says a folklore expert who has written extensively about ethnic jokes. Jackson campaign staffers have been puzzled as to why the Secret Service gave their candidate the code name "Pontiac," Knight Ridder News Service said in a report from Washington today. Some had speculated that "Pontiac" referred to Jackson's fast pace. However, the news service quoted Alan Dundes, a professor at the University of California at Berkeley, as saying that the code word "Pontiac" is an acronym for the punch line to a series of racist jokes.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 22, 2005 | HOWARD GENSLER Daily News wire services and Baird Jones contributed to this report
DAVID LETTERMAN, who knows a thing or two about stalkers, has been named in a temporary restraining order granted to Santa Fe's Colleen Nestler. What did Letterman do? According to Nestler's request filed last week, Letterman forced her into bankruptcy and has caused her "mental cruelty" and "sleep deprivation" since May 1994. She should watch Leno. Nestler requested that Letterman, who tapes his show in New York, stay at least three yards frrom her and not "think of me, and release me from his mental harassment and hammering.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 24, 1987 | Edited by Kathleen Shea from US magazine, Marilyn Beck, USA Today, the Associated Press, People magazine, the New York Post and the New York Daily News
SEAN GETS A TRIBUTE FROM WIFE MADONNA FEELS INSPIRED Madonna's given an interview to US magazine in which she talks about her early days in NYC, during which, she says, she ate out of garbage cans and soldiered on bravely through her tears, knowing she had nothing to go back home to in Bay City, Mich. Of husband Sean Penn, she says, "to me (he)is the perfect American male . . . I'm inspired and shocked by him at the same time. " The best part of the story, though, is when the perfect American male walks in at the end and announces, "the interview is over," begins talking about something or other, realizes the writers' tape is still running, and tries to erase it but can't figure out how to do it. Let's hope they don't move to the burbs and get into anything involving power tools.
NEWS
July 8, 1987
"Andy Hardy, Boy Adventurer" began its limited run yesterday, with Lt. Col. Oliver North in the title role of the fun-loving miscreant instead of Mickey Rooney, who has grown old since that style of entertainment was last in vogue. In the first episode: Ollie didn't remember anybody ever saying, "Ollie, this is wrong. " Ollie seemed to think destroying evidence was nothing more than a boyish prank. Ollie couldn't remember what happened to great mounds of money. Ollie doesn't sweat the small stuff, leading to speculation that his allowance is too big. Ollie got teen-age snarky with his superiors, displaying a smartass adolescent attitude toward the elected representatives of the people who are supposed to look into teen-age pranks like subverting the Constitution.
NEWS
December 10, 1991 | BY DAVE BARRY
I want to warn you right away that today's topic involves an extremely mature subject matter that might offend your community standards, if your community has any. I became sensitive about community standards recently when, at the suggestion of no less than a U.S. Supreme Court justice, I wrote a column about a ground-breaking anti-flatulence product called Beano. Some newspapers - and I do not wish to name names, but two of them were the Portland Oregonian and the St. Louis Post-Dispatch - refused to print this column on the grounds that it was tasteless and offensive.
NEWS
October 16, 1988 | By Roy H. Campbell, Inquirer Staff Writer
Their heads were dancing with visions of new cars, exotic vacations, expensive jewelry and dream homes. The well-dressed men and women in the Cornucopia Dinner Theater in West Philadelphia chatted excitedly and greeted one another by code names such as "Prime Rib," "Barbecue" and "T-Bone. " After a few minutes, a bearded man with gold-nugget jewelry gleaming on his wrist and fingers made his way to a microphone to address the 150 black people gathered. "We're here to talk about a dream," he said matter-of-factly, as though addressing a corporate meeting.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
May 5, 2011 | By Susan Montoya Bryan, Associated Press
Geronimo was a legendary Apache warrior whose purported ability to walk without leaving footprints allowed him to evade thousands of Mexican and U.S. soldiers, much like Osama bin Laden evaded capture for the last decade. But for American Indians, there's an important difference: Geronimo was a hero - not a terrorist. So to them, the U.S. military's use of the revered leader's moniker as a code name for bin Laden was appalling - a slap in the face that prompted statements of disapproval from tribal leaders, a flurry of angry comments on social-network sites, and a letter from the leader of Geronimo's tribe asking President Obama to apologize.
NEWS
January 7, 2010 | By GLORIA CAMPISI & CHRISTINE OLLEY, campisg@phillynews.com 215-854-5935
The Philadelphia NAACP says in a federal lawsuit filed against US Airways that the airline generally assigned its African-American employees to areas in Philadelphia International Airport that were given code names such as "Compton," "Camden" and "The Ghetto. " The suit, filed Tuesday by attorneys Brian and David Mildenberg, alleges racial discrimination and segregation against the airline's African-American employees and was filed on behalf of three former workers. "Each of our clients has explained that they were demoralized by their working experience with US Airways as a result of the practices described in the complaint," said Brian Mildenberg.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 5, 2007 | By David Hiltbrand INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Bringing together Cedric the Entertainer and Lucy Liu for a comedy/action hybrid is an obvious attempt to recapture the magic of the Chris Tucker and Jackie Chan pairing. But Code Name: The Cleaner is no Rush Hour. It's more like Driver's Training: an accident-prone fender-bender of a farce. Jake (Cedric the Entertainer) wakes up in a Seattle hotel room with a dead FBI agent, a satchel of cash, and no memory of who he is or how he got there. A statuesque blonde (Desperate Housewives' Nicollette Sheridan)
ENTERTAINMENT
December 22, 2005 | HOWARD GENSLER Daily News wire services and Baird Jones contributed to this report
DAVID LETTERMAN, who knows a thing or two about stalkers, has been named in a temporary restraining order granted to Santa Fe's Colleen Nestler. What did Letterman do? According to Nestler's request filed last week, Letterman forced her into bankruptcy and has caused her "mental cruelty" and "sleep deprivation" since May 1994. She should watch Leno. Nestler requested that Letterman, who tapes his show in New York, stay at least three yards frrom her and not "think of me, and release me from his mental harassment and hammering.
NEWS
December 2, 2004 | By Tom Lasseter INQUIRER FOREIGN STAFF
IN THE LAST OF FIVE PARTS, The Inquirer recounts last month's battle for Fallujah, the biggest urban battle involving the American military since U.S. forces retook the city of Hue during the Vietnam War. Correspondent Tom Lasseter was embedded with troops of the First Infantry Division as they fought across the Sunni-held insurgent stronghold. The combat was often fierce; at least 71 U.S. troops were killed and 600 wounded during the most intense fighting. Iraqi casualties were high.
NEWS
February 24, 1996 | by Jim Smith, Daily News Staff Writer
Spy or counterspy? Patriot or money-grubbing wartime traitor? Check or checkmate? Such were the buzz words that emerged yesterday like phantoms from the Cold War in a John Le Carre novel when the FBI busted the first alleged spy ever to be charged in Philadelphia with espionage. The defendant, Robert Stephen Lipka, 50, a pear-shaped, owlish-faced, unemployed but wealthy coin dealer and investment whiz from Lancaster County, is accused of selling classified information to the Soviets in the mid-1960s.
NEWS
August 4, 1995 | By Kyle York Spencer, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Majik is five feet tall, 13, and bored. He calls himself a tagger. He said he knew it was illegal to spray-paint his nickname on bridges, buildings and tractor-trailers. "But, dude, not that illegal," he said. Still, it's illegal enough for him to have been slapped with a fine, an invitation to court, and the prospect of spending the month cleaning the walls he and his buddies have scrawled on. Majik is one of at least eight borough teenagers - with code names like "Crazy," "Action," "UK77," "Think" and "Lucky" - who have slyly cruised the hilly streets with spray cans in their knapsacks and tagging on their minds.
NEWS
December 10, 1991 | BY DAVE BARRY
I want to warn you right away that today's topic involves an extremely mature subject matter that might offend your community standards, if your community has any. I became sensitive about community standards recently when, at the suggestion of no less than a U.S. Supreme Court justice, I wrote a column about a ground-breaking anti-flatulence product called Beano. Some newspapers - and I do not wish to name names, but two of them were the Portland Oregonian and the St. Louis Post-Dispatch - refused to print this column on the grounds that it was tasteless and offensive.
NEWS
October 16, 1988 | By Roy H. Campbell, Inquirer Staff Writer
Their heads were dancing with visions of new cars, exotic vacations, expensive jewelry and dream homes. The well-dressed men and women in the Cornucopia Dinner Theater in West Philadelphia chatted excitedly and greeted one another by code names such as "Prime Rib," "Barbecue" and "T-Bone. " After a few minutes, a bearded man with gold-nugget jewelry gleaming on his wrist and fingers made his way to a microphone to address the 150 black people gathered. "We're here to talk about a dream," he said matter-of-factly, as though addressing a corporate meeting.
NEWS
June 24, 1988 | By Doreen Carvajal, Inquirer Washington Bureau
To Secret Service agents, "Pontiac" is the terse code word for candidate Jesse Jackson that crackles in their radio earpieces. To folklore expert Alan Dundes, "Pontiac" is a slur - the punch line to a series of racist jokes collected by his students at the University of California at Berkeley. To Jackson campaign staff members, who cannot find out why the Secret Service tagged their candidate with the code, "Pontiac" is a suspicious coincidence. All candidates and major public officials protected by the Secret Service are assigned code names, which appear to reflect some personal attribute, such as President Reagan's cowboy-style code, "Rawhide.
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