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Coffee Beans

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BUSINESS
May 15, 1997 | By Rosland Briggs, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Every morning, Fred Kenner sips his coffee with friends at Old City Coffee Co. on Church Street. Kenner doesn't brew coffee at home, so he didn't notice the recent 25 percent increase in the price of bagged coffee beans there. But, come June, he'll probably notice the extra 15 cents he'll be paying for a large cup. That's because co-owner Jack Treatman can't swallow the rising cost of coffee much longer. "Nothing hurts us more than having to raise the prices, but it's important to be in business next week," Treatman said.
BUSINESS
September 30, 2015 | By Erin Arvedlund, Inquirer Staff Writer
National Coffee Day is Tuesday, Sept. 29, and national chains as well as local stores in the Philadelphia region are offering free or discounted coffee. Dunkin' Donuts will serve free medium-size hot or iced "dark roast" coffee. One per customer. Krispy Kreme will offer a free original glazed doughnut and a 12-ounce cup of coffee at participating U.S. locations. La Colombe, a local coffee roaster, was coy about its plans, saying only there were "surprises" in the works for Tuesday.
FOOD
December 17, 1986 | By POLLY FISHER, Special to the Daily News
Dear Polly: Where is the best place to store coffee? Room temperature, refrigerator or freezer? - Alan Dear Alan: Freezer is best, although I store small quantities (a pound or less) in the refrigerator if they will be used up fairly quickly. Roasted coffee beans go stale at room temperature very quickly. For the freshest coffee, you should buy whole roasted coffee beans from a store that turns over a great deal of coffee quickly and, preferably, roasts its own beans as needed.
NEWS
October 25, 1998 | By Michelle Crouch, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
The photographs on the wall at Coffee Works Roastery & Cafe sharply contrast with the shop's homey and cozy decor. The framed snapshots depict heavy machinery, rows of green plants, and coffee mills. But it is these pictures that give customers their first hint that despite its mismatched furniture, specialty blends, and shelves full of dog-eared bestsellers and games, this isn't just a new place to sit and sip. It is also a roastery. The coffee house, which opened in June in the Ritz Center on Haddonfield-Berlin Road, is one of just a few area businesses where coffee beans are roasted on the premises.
BUSINESS
March 3, 1989 | By Sheila Simmons, Daily News Staff Writer
Perhaps you've noticed by now that all one-pound cans of coffee don't weigh one pound anymore. Coffee companies say it's no trick. But coffee buyers may wonder if they're getting less for their money these days. Others say consumers aren't necessarily getting more. A little more than a year ago, many of the industry's major brands began replacing their 16-ounce cans and bags of coffee with cans or bags carrying only 13 ounces. Some brands also have added 11 1/2-ounce cans to supermarket shelves.
FOOD
June 24, 1992 | by Maria Gallagher, Daily News Staff Writer
Not so long ago, Philadelphians who loved cappuccino or espresso could find a cup only at the end of a meal in an Italian restaurant. Now it's possible to grab a cafe latte on the run, to take a double espresso back to the office, to make cappuccino at home, to linger over a flavored coffee and listen to music. Coffeehouses, cafes and takeout coffee places with broader horizons than "Regular or decaf?" have sprung up throughout the city, cheerfully filling our craving for more sophisticated forms of java.
NEWS
February 16, 1986 | By Robert J. Salgado, Special to The Inquirer
Fante's is a familiar name to those interested in cooking and food, but many will think of it as a South Philadelphia institution, which it still is. However, there is a branch at the Springfield Mall in Delaware County that captures much of the flavor of the original store in Phildelphia's Ninth Street Market. "Everything for the kitchen" is the motto on the sign outside the mall store. Once inside, you tend to believe it because the small shop has so much merchandise that there is hardly room for people.
TRAVEL
April 28, 2014 | By Kelly J. Collins, For The Inquirer
Twenty-nine years ago, in 1985, I traveled to Mekele, Ethiopia, for a six-month stay under the auspices of an African relief agency to participate in famine relief. It proved to be my most life-changing experience. We lived in Haile Selassie's empty summer castle, commuted by truck to the famine camps, and worked alongside other international groups inoculating, feeding, and hydrating the thousands displaced and affected by the ongoing drought. Life-changing, heartwarming, moving. rewarding only begin to express the experience.
FOOD
June 8, 1994 | By Marilynn Marter, INQUIRER FOOD WRITER
There are two basic types of coffee beans - arabica and robusto. Virtually all quality beans are of the arabica type, which grows higher in the mountains and has less caffeine. (Caffeine is the plant's natural defense against insects, and since few insects survive high altitudes, plants grown at higher points have less need for defense.) While good beans - a result of growing conditions - are essential to a good cup of coffee, the methods of processing, roasting, brewing and proper handling throughout the coffee-making process all affect the quality of what you end up drinking.
NEWS
December 4, 2005 | By Julie Shaw INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
With wicker baskets strapped around their shoulders, students from Friends School Haverford picked red and green coffee berries off 6-foot-tall trees in Costa Rica. The coffee beans inside the berries are the livelihood of the local farmers and their families who have leased the 24 parcels of land on the 120-acre Finca La Bella ("Beautiful Farm"), a farming community established by Quakers in the northern town of Monteverde. The 15 students, who were sixth graders on February's trip, were able to see how coffee farmers in this Central American country live and work.
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BUSINESS
September 30, 2015 | By Erin Arvedlund, Inquirer Staff Writer
National Coffee Day is Tuesday, Sept. 29, and national chains as well as local stores in the Philadelphia region are offering free or discounted coffee. Dunkin' Donuts will serve free medium-size hot or iced "dark roast" coffee. One per customer. Krispy Kreme will offer a free original glazed doughnut and a 12-ounce cup of coffee at participating U.S. locations. La Colombe, a local coffee roaster, was coy about its plans, saying only there were "surprises" in the works for Tuesday.
TRAVEL
April 28, 2014 | By Kelly J. Collins, For The Inquirer
Twenty-nine years ago, in 1985, I traveled to Mekele, Ethiopia, for a six-month stay under the auspices of an African relief agency to participate in famine relief. It proved to be my most life-changing experience. We lived in Haile Selassie's empty summer castle, commuted by truck to the famine camps, and worked alongside other international groups inoculating, feeding, and hydrating the thousands displaced and affected by the ongoing drought. Life-changing, heartwarming, moving. rewarding only begin to express the experience.
NEWS
August 22, 2013
B RITTNEY "BLEW" Lewis, 25, of Kensington, owns Leotah's Place CoffeeHouse, at York and Coral streets in Kensington. Lewis, a single mom, started the business with a former business partner in 2010 as a spot where patrons could gather for coffee, conversation and community events. Q: How'd you get the idea? A: I worked at Starbucks but realized there weren't any cafes that were true community spaces in lower-income neighborhoods. I met a friend with a portable espresso machine who introduced me to direct-trade coffee.
NEWS
May 10, 2013 | BY LAUREN McCUTCHEON, Daily News Staff Writer mccutch@phillynews.com, 215-854-5991
COFFEE expert Aaron Ultimo doesn't do drive-through java. He can't remember the last time he had Starbucks. And, until very recently, he hadn't drunk a Dunkin'. Or even a Wawa. Ultimo and his wife, Elizabeth, own and run two South Philly shops. Foodie website The Daily Meal recently rated Ultimo Coffee's locations the best in the U.S. At the Ultimos' cafes - one at 15th and Mifflin, one at 22nd and Catharine - each fresh grind represents a single-origin, sustainable grower.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 23, 2012 | By Dan Gross
MILEY CYRUS LINED UP like any other historically minded tourist at the Betsy Ross House on Tuesday afternoon and bought three tickets for her and friends. Cyrus and company listened for a few minutes as Betsy Ross (Carol Spacht) talked about her work, then continued their self-guided tour of the house. The singer/actress has been staying on Washington Square with fiancé Liam Hemsworth , who was busy Tuesday filming "Paranoia" with Harrison Ford outside and inside the Beasley law firm's offices at 12th & Walnut.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 10, 2012 | Wires
Q: For the last two months, I have been taking a green coffee bean extract recommended by Dr. Oz on his show. So far, I've lost 10 pounds without even trying. What's your opinion of it? A: Generally, if something seems too good to be true, it probably is. But this stuff may actually work. Excitement about the weight-loss magic of green coffee bean extract began this year, after a "randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, linear dose, crossover University of Scranton study.
FOOD
March 17, 2011 | By Steven Rea, Inquirer Staff Writer
My wife has an idea for a coffee place: a hole-in-the-wall in one of the hipper quadrants of Brooklyn - East Williamsburg, say, or Red Hook - with a 1950s percolator on an electric range, brewing Yuban out of a can. Totally retro, serving a cup of Joe that boasts bold intimations of tin and notes of cigarette ash. The line, she predicts, will be out the door. That's her response - joking, contrarian - to the super-serious artistry happening right now with the so-called Third Wave of coffee roasters and cafes in Philadelphia and across our caffeinated landscape.
NEWS
December 11, 2005 | By Julie Shaw INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
With wicker baskets strapped around their shoulders, students from Friends School Haverford picked red and green coffee berries off 6-foot-tall trees in Costa Rica. The coffee beans inside the berries are the livelihood of the local farmers and their families who have leased the 24 parcels of land on the 120-acre Finca La Bella ("Beautiful Farm"), a farming community established by Quakers in the northern town of Monteverde. The 15 students, who were sixth graders on February's trip, were able to see how coffee farmers in this Central American country live and work.
NEWS
June 19, 2003 | By Faye Flam INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
At last, science may have solved one of the most vexing problems of the modern age: how to make a cup of decaf coffee that tastes good. By altering the genes of the coffee plant, Japanese scientists have found they can reduce the caffeine content by 70 percent, they reported today in the journal Nature. The scientists say it will take a few more years before they have a product ready to market. Currently, coffee beans go through a punishing ordeal to remove their caffeine.
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