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ENTERTAINMENT
September 8, 2002 | By Edward J. Sozanski INQUIRER ART CRITIC
Warning to all Philadelphians: Stealth art is coming your way. It might even be among us now, disguised as advertising billboards, lurking in bus shelters, printed on paper coffee cups. You might not recognize it when you see it. In fact, if you're zipping along local expressways, which are clotted with billboards, you might not see it at all. At least not immediately. Theory holds that after repeated exposures to stealth art in its various manifestations, you'll eventually realize that it's embedded in your consciousness.
NEWS
December 6, 2015 | By Scott Sturgis, For The Inquirer
Honda HR-V vs. Mazda CX-3 vs. Kia Soul vs. Buick Encore: Small crossover four-way, part two. This week: 2016 Mazda CX-3 Grand Touring AWD. Price: $29,790 as tested (including $550 for Mazda mobile start, and $100 each for door-sill trim plates and rear bumper guard). A bare-bones front-wheel-drive model can be had for $19,960. Marketer's pitch: "What if more adventures started from the driver's seat?" Conventional wisdom: Edmunds.com liked the "excellent fuel economy; sporty handling; quiet speed; attractive, high-quality interior with appealing features," but not the "snug rear seat; humble cargo capacity.
NEWS
January 2, 2002 | By Deborah Burnham
In the city where too much fills cabs, boutiques, ballparks, there's a new surplus: too many things to save from shrines erected for September's dead. How to preserve globbed candle wax, trampled blooms And the e-mails, thousands: I / might Can't / always / Please / Everything will / Don't stacked on servers. They'll be saved. So will the coffee cups, cracks and seams grayed by concrete, ash And the window blind, looped around a churchyard tree, frail slats bent, thrust around each other like a ruined helix, strands no longer passing light or information Deborah Burnham (dburnham@sas.
NEWS
September 25, 2012 | By Peter Mucha, Inquirer Staff Writer
It's National Coffee Week and several retailers are giving away free cups. Participating East Coast McDonald's locations - 5,000 in all, says a company rep - will be pouring free small cups each day through Saturday of Premium Roast Coffee. To find a location, go to www.mcdonalds.com , click "locations" and punch in a town or zip code. To see the ad for the offer, scroll below the map, find the store, and click "Restaurant Homepage. " Participating 7-Eleven stores will be dispensing large free 20-ounce cups from 6 a.m. to 10 a.m. Friday, Sept.
NEWS
December 17, 1986 | By Gerald B. Jordan, Inquirer Washington Bureau
A Pennsylvania chemistry teacher who says that industry standards for lead content on the rims of ceramic mugs are "asinine" has stirred a tempest in a coffee mug by asserting that coffee cups distributed by the American Lung Association are potentially dangerous to children. But spokesmen for the nonprofit association and Mattel Inc., the U.S. distributor for the Korean-made mugs handed out by the lung association, said yesterday that independent tests show the lead and cadmium levels in the mugs "meet all standards of the Food and Drug Administration and voluntary standards of the industry.
BUSINESS
December 2, 1992 | by Rose DeWolf, Daily News Staff Writer
Who is that strange man in her apartment? Her Brother? An ex-husband? A colleague from work who has arranged to pick her up en route to a conference? Fans of Taster's Choice TV commercials want to know. But they will have to wait until January to find out . . . At least they hope they'll find out in January. That's when a new 45-second commercial for Nestle's Taster's Choice instant coffee is scheduled to appear. These mini-soap opera commercials have attracted so large a following that sales of Taster's Choice (both regular and decaffeinated)
NEWS
August 30, 1994 | Daily News wire services
TOLEDO BURGER KING SUED OVER SPILLED COFFEE A woman who said she suffered serious burns when a cup of Burger King coffee spilled on her body has sued the fast-food restaurant chain for $65,000. The legal action came almost two years after the alleged incident and just over a week after a New Mexico jury awarded almost $3 million to a woman in a similar case involving McDonald's. Mary Lou Trammel of Holland, Ohio, says she bought four cups of coffee at a Burger King drive-through window on Aug. 30, 1992.
NEWS
June 19, 1987 | Edited by Kathleen Shea from the Associated Press, the New York Daily News, and USA Today
DION & BELMONTS: GROWNUPS IN LOVE Dion DiMucci and the Belmonts, who are giving two sold-out reunion concerts at Radio City Music Hall this weekend, went back to the old neighborhood the other day. Nobody recognized the 50s pop star until he starting singing one of his old hits, "The Wanderer. " "Man, he looks great now," said Dave Greco, a counterman at Mike's Deli in the Belmont section of the Bronx. "I'm glad he's out of that junkie thing. " DiMucci, who's 48 now and lives in Miami, kicked a heroin habit.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 17, 1989 | By Nels Nelson, Daily News Theater Critic
Adolph Green, Betty Comden and, between them, Green's wife, the actress Phyllis Newman, were sitting in the row directly in front of me in the Music Box Theatre. An unexpected and unparalleled opportunity, I naively reasoned, to see a new Broadway musical through the eyes of people who made Broadway musicals. What is more, Green and Comden are involved in the writing of another Cy Coleman show, not yet on the boards, titled "The Ziegfeld Follies Presents Will Rogers. " The pit band struck up the peppy overture to Coleman's newest, "Welcome to the Club.
NEWS
December 18, 1997 | by Joe Clark, Daily News Staff Writer
It's a corner that never sleeps. Never. A corner where no one ever watches the clock. Ever. When the rest of the city, most of it anyway, is dead to the world, 9th and Passyunk comes to life. Some say it's the busiest corner in the city. Who's to argue? With two around-the-clock steak shops, a clam house that doesn't close until 4 or 5 a.m., and a 20-hour newsstand, there's non-stop night life. Throw in a guy who's been selling Christmas trees 24 hours a day, and . . . well you get the picture.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
December 6, 2015 | By Scott Sturgis, For The Inquirer
Honda HR-V vs. Mazda CX-3 vs. Kia Soul vs. Buick Encore: Small crossover four-way, part two. This week: 2016 Mazda CX-3 Grand Touring AWD. Price: $29,790 as tested (including $550 for Mazda mobile start, and $100 each for door-sill trim plates and rear bumper guard). A bare-bones front-wheel-drive model can be had for $19,960. Marketer's pitch: "What if more adventures started from the driver's seat?" Conventional wisdom: Edmunds.com liked the "excellent fuel economy; sporty handling; quiet speed; attractive, high-quality interior with appealing features," but not the "snug rear seat; humble cargo capacity.
NEWS
November 18, 2012 | By Sandy Bauers, Inquirer Staff Writer
The runners in this weekend's Philadelphia Marathon will be led by a Chevy Volt. The 600,000 or so cups they gulp water out of will be compostable. The porta-potties will have nontoxic chemicals. And a whole lot more. After a few baby steps in recent years, the event is looking distinctly green, right down to the unclaimed medals organizers plan to melt and use again. Indeed, this year's Sunday race is so green that the city hopes to have it certified by a national sports sustainability organization.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 17, 2012 | By Sandy Bauers, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The runners in this weekend's Philadelphia marathon will be led by a Chevy Volt. The 600,000 or so cups they gulp water out of will be compostable. The port-a-potties will have nontoxic chemicals. And a whole lot more. After a few baby steps in recent years, the event is looking distinctly green, right down to the unclaimed medals they plan to melt and use again. Indeed, this year's race is so green that the city hopes to have it certified by a national sports sustainability organization.
NEWS
September 25, 2012 | By Peter Mucha, Inquirer Staff Writer
It's National Coffee Week and several retailers are giving away free cups. Participating East Coast McDonald's locations - 5,000 in all, says a company rep - will be pouring free small cups each day through Saturday of Premium Roast Coffee. To find a location, go to www.mcdonalds.com , click "locations" and punch in a town or zip code. To see the ad for the offer, scroll below the map, find the store, and click "Restaurant Homepage. " Participating 7-Eleven stores will be dispensing large free 20-ounce cups from 6 a.m. to 10 a.m. Friday, Sept.
FOOD
February 23, 2006 | By Dianna Marder INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
In a city with no shortage of coffee shops, only one is considered among the top five in the nation: La Colombe Torrefaction. At least that is what Food & Wine magazine says in its March issue, citing the cafe at 130 S. 19th St. for its silky cappuccino and particularly fresh pastry. Of course, the quality of the coffee is what counts overall, for customers and critics. But so many small cafes now serve La Colombe that it is difficult to cite the brew itself as the source of the cafe's popularity.
NEWS
August 11, 2004 | By Barbara Stavetski
Everywhere I go, I see people hoisting Wawa takeout cups: at swim-team practice, at morning school drop-off, on the drive to work. Seems as if everyone is always drinking a cup of Wawa coffee. I drink tea, not coffee, but still I wondered what I might be missing. Why didn't people drink their coffee at home? What was this Wawa experience? I had to find out. I decided to stop at a Wawa and pick up an early-morning cup of freshly brewed coffee. When I arrived, the parking lot was packed.
NEWS
December 29, 2002 | By Daniel Rubin INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
It's been a well-caffeinated year since Starbucks splashed onto the turf of the traditional Viennese coffeehouse, with its silver trays, heavy cream and tuxedoed indifference. There are eight new Starbucks outposts in the heart of European coffee culture, and Viennese wags are talking about the "Starbucks effect," which to Christian Wurmdobler, writer for the city magazine Falter, means "you can finally go into a coffeehouse and order a latte without them scowling at you. " There's more spillover: The quality of coffee in traditional coffeehouses has improved, says Wurmdobler, who rarely visits the 1,900 or so Viennese institutions, because, "contrary to popular belief, the coffee is not very good.
NEWS
October 15, 2002 | By Amie Parnes INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Even on a Monday night, in this quiet community far from city lights and thumping dance beats, there is a steady stream of people lured by that seductive mermaid on all those coffee cups. A man with slick, black hair wants one of those cups. Actually, two - one for him, and one for that blond he met over there. "Two doppio espresso macchiatos," he says at the counter of the Starbucks on State Street. "Tall. " "Tall" is Starbucks lingo that Tom Peters learned a few years back when the coffee chain opened a store in the borough, which has been transformed by coffee-sipping window-shoppers who linger late into the evening.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 8, 2002 | By Edward J. Sozanski INQUIRER ART CRITIC
Warning to all Philadelphians: Stealth art is coming your way. It might even be among us now, disguised as advertising billboards, lurking in bus shelters, printed on paper coffee cups. You might not recognize it when you see it. In fact, if you're zipping along local expressways, which are clotted with billboards, you might not see it at all. At least not immediately. Theory holds that after repeated exposures to stealth art in its various manifestations, you'll eventually realize that it's embedded in your consciousness.
NEWS
April 7, 2002 | By Kristen A. Graham INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Step into the sunny, humming cafe smack in the middle of a strip shopping center and you step into Norman Shabel's dream. Sipping a delicious brew out of cream-colored china demitasse in a Paris haunt a few years back, Shabel hatched a plan for a business he thought would be perfect for this region. "I wanted people to be able to drink a delicious cup of coffee on a sidewalk with the sun streaming on their face," explained Shabel, a lawyer and novelist who lives part time in Europe and part time in Moorestown.
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