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Coffee House

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NEWS
November 8, 1987 | By Nancy Reuter, Special to The Inquirer
The 20th anniversary season of the Perimeter II Coffee House, which opened last week, continues Friday with a concert of varied instrumental and vocal music by Sherry Somach and Lou Stebner. The concert, which will be preceded by an open stage, will be held at the Perimeter's new home in the Jaycees Community Hall at 200 East Ormond Ave. in Oaklyn. "We have always featured traditional music, or music that follows the traditional form," said Anne Deeney of Audubon, the manager/president of the coffee house.
NEWS
January 15, 1989 | By Nancy Reuter, Special to The Inquirer
After a business year that was virtually wiped out by a fire that damaged its concert site, the Perimeter II Coffee House is back and anticipating a full season of Friday night acoustic music concerts in 1989. The organization is once again holding shows in the Jaycees Community Hall at 143 E. Ormond Ave. in Oaklyn. The Coffee House, which will celebrate its 23d anniversary on May 5, was founded by a group of students at Rutgers University-Camden, where the organization was located through 1980, said Anne Deeney, the manager of the Perimeter II. In 1981, the Coffee House moved its concert site to an old railroad station in West Collingswood, but renovations to the building forced it from there and into the Jaycees Community Hall in fall 1987, Deeney said.
NEWS
April 17, 1987 | By William W. Sutton Jr., Inquirer Staff Writer
Folk singer Pete Seeger came to the Blushing Zebra coffee house in Mount Airy last night to sing for Councilman Angel L. Ortiz and endorse his re- election effort. "He's outgoing, he's frank, he's witty," said Seeger of Ortiz before his campaign-benefit performance. "A lot of politicians are always whispering, saying, 'I can't say this out loud, but I'm going to do this, or I'm going to do that.' Ortiz, I believe, is going to speak out loud, whether people like it or not. " Seeger met Ortiz in Nicaragua in January when the councilman accompanied U.S. Rep. Thomas M. Foglietta and several other congressmen and journalists to the Central American nation where contra rebels, with support from President Reagan, are challenging government rule of the Sandinistas.
NEWS
April 3, 2016 | By John N. McGuire, Staff Writer
For the last four years, musician Nick Wright has composed music for vocal groups at Cherry Hill High School East. On Saturday, the students will give back with 25 performances to benefit Wright's girlfriend, Ali Webb, in a night-time fund-raiser to help with her mounting medical bills. Wright, 25, of Cincinnati, said Webb, 24, was diagnosed with liver cancer in May 2015. Since then, the cancer has spread into her right lung, moving her to Stage 4. Wright said he met his girlfriend during their freshman year at Miami University while the two were playing in the school's marching band.
NEWS
February 12, 1989 | By Gloria A. Hoffner, Special to The Inquirer
The soft glow of candlelight, broken only by a single spotlight on the stage, sets the mood as a crowd of about 80 listens to the music of the people - folk music. The spotlight is on singer Kathy McMerty, who is reaching the end of her performance at The Coffee House, a folk-singing club that comes to life once a month in the Swarthmore Community Center, 715 Harvard Ave. McMerty asks the audience to join her in the chorus of "West Virginia Friend. " "I don't want to say goodbye to you. " "Think of me someday when you're lonely and know you have a West Virginia friend.
NEWS
May 28, 1999 | By John Corr, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Stories - serious, silly and thoughtful - will be on the menu Sunday, along with an array of kosher desserts, when storyteller Vicky Town brings her "Night of Jewish Storytelling" to the Church of the Loving Shepherd, 1066 S. New St., West Chester. Town, a member of the National Storytelling Association and the Philadelphia Storytelling Guild, blends stories from many cultures with mime and audience participation. The Church of the Loving Shepherd is also the meeting place of Beth Chaim Reform Congregation of West Chester.
NEWS
May 29, 2016 | By Kellie Patrick Gates, Staff Writer
Hello there She first saw him across the room at a family friend's wedding, dancing awkwardly. "Who is that?" Farwa asked her sister Fatima. "That's the guy Mom's been trying to set you up with," her sister said. Fatima recognized Shaan from a photo shared with their mom, Kishwar, by Kishwar's friend Naheeda, who is Shaan's aunt. The women hoped the wonderful yet perpetually single young people in their lives might make a good pair. And that right there was why Farwa had refused to know the man's name or even look at his picture.
NEWS
October 25, 1998 | By Michelle Crouch, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
The photographs on the wall at Coffee Works Roastery & Cafe sharply contrast with the shop's homey and cozy decor. The framed snapshots depict heavy machinery, rows of green plants, and coffee mills. But it is these pictures that give customers their first hint that despite its mismatched furniture, specialty blends, and shelves full of dog-eared bestsellers and games, this isn't just a new place to sit and sip. It is also a roastery. The coffee house, which opened in June in the Ritz Center on Haddonfield-Berlin Road, is one of just a few area businesses where coffee beans are roasted on the premises.
NEWS
March 16, 1988 | By ROBYN SCHAUFFELE SELVIN, Daily News Sales Columnist
The Bombay Company's sales are always a pleasure to shop: The discounts are enticing (usually 15 to 30 percent, more on closeouts) and the merchandise is frequently out of the ordinary. You'll find beautifully scaled reproductions of traditional (mostly 18th-century English) furniture in knock-down (ready- to-assemble) form. Details include a rich mahogany finish on most pieces, authentically styled brass hardware, striking veneers. A real find: the decorative accessories at Bombay.
NEWS
August 12, 1992 | By Kristin E. Holmes, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Back in the '60s, when coffeehouses were smoke-filled retreats for seekers of some elusive truth, Steve George was tiptoeing around land mines in Vietnam. Poets in black berets soliloquized stateside. George ducked bullets and received an honorable discharge after two years. But when the Upper Darby native returned to Delaware County, a girl named Sue, from Drexel Hill, broke his heart. He left town in a tailspin and in his Nova. He found asylum - at a Michigan coffeehouse.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
May 29, 2016 | By Kellie Patrick Gates, Staff Writer
Hello there She first saw him across the room at a family friend's wedding, dancing awkwardly. "Who is that?" Farwa asked her sister Fatima. "That's the guy Mom's been trying to set you up with," her sister said. Fatima recognized Shaan from a photo shared with their mom, Kishwar, by Kishwar's friend Naheeda, who is Shaan's aunt. The women hoped the wonderful yet perpetually single young people in their lives might make a good pair. And that right there was why Farwa had refused to know the man's name or even look at his picture.
NEWS
April 3, 2016 | By John N. McGuire, Staff Writer
For the last four years, musician Nick Wright has composed music for vocal groups at Cherry Hill High School East. On Saturday, the students will give back with 25 performances to benefit Wright's girlfriend, Ali Webb, in a night-time fund-raiser to help with her mounting medical bills. Wright, 25, of Cincinnati, said Webb, 24, was diagnosed with liver cancer in May 2015. Since then, the cancer has spread into her right lung, moving her to Stage 4. Wright said he met his girlfriend during their freshman year at Miami University while the two were playing in the school's marching band.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 5, 2012
KRISTIN LAJEUNNESSE can't be the only person who's ever thought of traveling the United States eating at every vegan restaurant. But she's the one who's actually doing it, in a project called "Will Travel for Vegan Food. " Her journey began last fall, and in March she came through Philadelphia. I interviewed her afterward to get an outsider's perspective on our veg scene. Q: How did this go from "crazy idea" to a reality of your daily life? A: I was ready to start living these "dreams" I had. I left my 9-to-5 job, set up a social-media consulting business, spent a few months planning the trip and securing a van, started a Kickstarter project to help fund gas and food, and then . . .I was off!
NEWS
February 24, 2007 | By Julie Stoiber INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Last winter, when Arch Street United Methodist Church teamed with Project Home to turn its fellowship hall into an overnight drop-in center for the homeless, the Rev. Robin Hynicka approached the experiment with a realistic eye. "Our goal was very simple," he said. "Let's keep some folks from freezing to death. " Now, with "Grace Cafe" in its second year and two similar church-backed operations having opened in Center City, he has begun to believe such low-demand, unstructured environments could be a promising step in coaxing the most service-resistant of the city's homeless to give up their outposts in parks and alleys.
NEWS
October 29, 1999 | by Jonathan Takiff, Daily News Staff Writer
Here's good news for devotees of in-your-face, striving-for-glory pop music - the kind that picks you up, turns you over and shakes all the loose change out of your pockets and brains. Psyche-piercing singer/composer Adam Duritz still isn't satisfied, still hasn't settled down, still hasn't lost the flame that's made Counting Crows one of the most passionate, honest and humane of American guitar-rock bands of the 1990s. Proof is all over the group's third studio album, "This Desert Life," which hits stores Tuesday, the night before the group plays the Tower Theater in Upper Darby.
NEWS
May 28, 1999 | By John Corr, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Stories - serious, silly and thoughtful - will be on the menu Sunday, along with an array of kosher desserts, when storyteller Vicky Town brings her "Night of Jewish Storytelling" to the Church of the Loving Shepherd, 1066 S. New St., West Chester. Town, a member of the National Storytelling Association and the Philadelphia Storytelling Guild, blends stories from many cultures with mime and audience participation. The Church of the Loving Shepherd is also the meeting place of Beth Chaim Reform Congregation of West Chester.
NEWS
March 16, 1999 | by Sally Siebert, For the Daily News
The tiny shingle over the door advertises a coffee shop, but it should read: "The world's problems solved here. " Welcome to Cafe Seattle, an understated little coffee house in Haddonfield where the customers' opinions and advice are as strong as the java. It's a friendly place where everyone knows your name - but if you stay around long enough someone may have something to say about that, too. Jackie Straijer was a regular customer when she decided to buy the place three years ago. "I wanted to preserve this special atmosphere," she said.
NEWS
December 4, 1998 | by Jonathan Takiff, Daily News Staff Writer
From the night it first opened in 1964 at 874 W. Lancaster Ave. in Bryn Mawr, the Main Point coffeehouse was the right club in the right place at the right time. Riding the crest of the acoustic music boom, the club gave folks of all ages a pleasant place to hang out together, and introduced them to a zillion great young talents - Jackson Browne, Bonnie Raitt, James Taylor, Bruce Springsteen . . . Thirty-four years later, a new Bryn Mawr establishment just two doors away (880 W. Lancaster)
NEWS
November 29, 1998 | By Tanyanika Samuels, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Behind a 45-foot-long construction barricade, a new Cafe Neena is beginning to take shape. The size of the quaint Italian-American restaurant - now 1,000 square feet at 9 Delaware St. - is about to quadruple, and then some. Early next month, Cafe Neena is scheduled to reopen at 1620 S. Broad St., with 4,500 square feet of space. The new look of the eatery will be due in part to Main Street Woodbury, a nonprofit downtown redevelopment organization that is offering free architectural-design consultations as part of its business retention program.
NEWS
October 25, 1998 | By Michelle Crouch, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
The photographs on the wall at Coffee Works Roastery & Cafe sharply contrast with the shop's homey and cozy decor. The framed snapshots depict heavy machinery, rows of green plants, and coffee mills. But it is these pictures that give customers their first hint that despite its mismatched furniture, specialty blends, and shelves full of dog-eared bestsellers and games, this isn't just a new place to sit and sip. It is also a roastery. The coffee house, which opened in June in the Ritz Center on Haddonfield-Berlin Road, is one of just a few area businesses where coffee beans are roasted on the premises.
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