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NEWS
October 13, 2011 | By Joseph A. Slobodzian, Inquirer Staff Writer
The homeless man accused in the March 31 rape of a South Philadelphia coffee-shop barista pleaded guilty Wednesday before a Philadelphia judge. Christopher Reeves, 32, pleaded guilty to rape, two counts of involuntary deviate sexual intercourse, and a count of robbery before Common Pleas Court Judge William J. Mazzola in the sexual assault of a 29-year-old employee of the Bean Exchange Coffeehouse at Seventh and Bainbridge Streets in Bella Vista....
LIVING
September 25, 1996 | By W. Speers This story contains material from the Associated Press, Reuters, New York Daily News and Star
Clint Eastwood flinched first and settled a lawsuit yesterday with ex-live-in Sondra Locke minutes before a jury was to render a verdict in her favor. Neither side was talking how much, but her lawyer said it was a straight cash deal with no future considerations. Locke had sought $2.5 mil for Eastwood's alleged sabotaging of her directing career. A juror said damages were discussed from $15,000 to $10 mil. The lawsuit was over a movie deal he supposedly brokered for her at Warner Bros.
NEWS
June 22, 2013
By Matt Katz I've been sitting in this coffee shop for 20 minutes and have yet to hear a word spoken. Two customers are enveloped in huge headphones; three others are stoically sunbathing in the glow of their laptops. I feel the barista counting down the minutes until quitting time. I hate this place. And I miss Beauty Shop Café. My local coffee shop - the one on the corner of my block in the Graduate Hospital neighborhood, the one where I really did know everyone's name, the one with the old-school hair dryer in the corner paying homage to its beauty shop past - was sold last month.
NEWS
June 21, 1998 | By Jon Stenzler, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
In an age of consolidation, when bigger is better and success depends on brand-name recognition, the manager of a small coffee shop is trying to defy the odds and thrive against the Goliath of coffee companies. Cafe Seattle, on Haddon Avenue a few hundred yards from Starbucks Coffee, is surviving in the shadow of one of the 1,500 franchises of the coffee giant and it has posted an increasing monthly profit since Starbucks opened in the spring of 1996. Described by patrons as a "place where everybody knows your name," like the TV bar on Cheers, Cafe Seattle has a diverse clientele that is lured as much by the coffee as by the comfortable decor, its managers say. Owner Jackie Straijer, 34, the mother of three boys and a Haddonfield resident, described her store and its patrons as a "big family," albeit an unusual one. This, Straijer said, is part of Seattle's appeal.
NEWS
December 11, 1991 | By Linda Loyd, Inquirer Staff Writer
Stephen Rivel strolled into the all-night Dunkin' Donuts on Pine Road in Fox Chase for a cup of coffee and unwittingly interrupted three gunslinging robbers breaking into the safe, according to testimony yesterday in Municipal Court. When Rivel, 30, resisted being forced into a walk-in freezer with two doughnut shop workers and another customer, two gunmen fired shots into Rivel's leg and into the back of his head. "Timmy told the guy to get down on the floor and the guy wouldn't get down," one suspect, Theodore Burns, said in a statement to police that was read at yesterday's court hearing.
NEWS
July 27, 2013
Jamie Lokoff and Tommy Joyner, the musicians turned coffee shop owners turned movie producers, have sold their MilkBoy coffee shop in Ardmore. With the sale of a smaller coffee shop next to the Bryn Mawr Film Institute in 2011 - now called HotHouse Coffee - the Main Line entrepreneurs have officially left the area. "It was time, we have a lot of stuff going on in the city and our energies have shifted focus," said Lokoff. The new MilkBoy owners, Mark and Cathy Roy, plan to keep the space the same for now until they get to know the business better, he said.
NEWS
November 1, 2011 | By Claudia Vargas, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
A Camden entrepreneur, whose coffee shop offered DNA tests as well as java, vowed Tuesday to fight a judge's ruling that he verbally agreed to settle a sexual harassment suit brought by six female employees. The $75,000 agreement - including $15,000 to be shared by the former employees - had been contested by Ronald Ford Jr., the owner of City Coffee, who refused to sign the settlement document this summer. "I refuse to be extorted," Ford said Tuesday, following an announcement of the settlement by the state Attorney General's Office Division on Civil Rights.
NEWS
August 28, 2013 | By Sulaiman Abdur-Rahman, Inquirer Staff Writer
A vandal smashed two windows of a coffee shop in South Philadelphia's Point Breeze neighborhood over the weekend, causing about $2,000 in property damage, police said. The owner of OCF Coffee House, Ori C. Feibush, said Monday that he reviewed surveillance video of the incident and is "confident" police will identify and arrest the culprit. "The video clearly shows this was deliberate, it was planned, and it was coordinated," said Feibush, 29, a real estate developer. Feibush, who has been embroiled in a long-running dispute with residents who oppose his redevelopment company, blamed the attack on a neighborhood group, the Point Breeze Organizing Committee.
NEWS
June 19, 2010 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writer
A pair of masked men armed with a stun gun ambushed two Bryn Mawr Starbucks employees early Friday as they prepared to open the coffee shop for the day, police said. The thieves wounded the workers and robbed the shop of cash. They entered the store, 766 Lancaster Ave., at 5:15 and forced the two to the floor behind the counter, said Lower Merion Police Superintendent Michael J. McGrath. The robbers took about $800 in bills and coins, he said. The men used the stun gun to shock the employees, who had superficial wounds, McGrath said.
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BUSINESS
June 6, 2015 | By Jane M. Von Bergen, Inquirer Staff Writer
At first blush, this is a headline screamer: Philadelphia region brings up the bottom in job recovery. How bad is it? So bad that the region's wretched post-recession job-growth performance makes the beleaguered city of Detroit look like a rock star, based on a Pew Trust analysis of U.S. Labor Department Statistics. Of the nation's 50 top metropolitan regions, Philadelphia ranked 47th, with 4.7 percent increase in jobs since the darkest days of the recession. At the top, San Jose, Calif., grew 23.7 percent, followed by Austin, Texas, at 22.6 percent, and Nashville at 19.3 percent.
BUSINESS
March 31, 2015 | By Jane M. Von Bergen, Inquirer Staff Writer
When Nick Bayer, now 37, went to college, he had no idea what he wanted to do. Business, industry, finance - each internship served to eliminate those as possibilities. "I remember Sunday nights were the most depressing nights for my family, because my parents had to go to jobs they didn't really like," Bayer said. "I didn't want to have a depressing Sunday night every week. "I wanted to love what I did. It dawned on me that the only way to really do that was to create something for myself.
NEWS
October 27, 2014 | By Laura McCrystal, Inquirer Staff Writer
After 15 years in Morocco, Steve and Judi Bowman wanted to return home to a diverse community in the United States. So they settled in Upper Darby. The couple renovated a building across from the township building and opened it last year as Five Points Coffee. But Five Points is more than a coffee shop. The Bowmans also started a nonprofit organization, with a vision of serving international students, immigrants, and refugees. Their shop has become a regular meeting place for English conversation groups for nonnative speakers, a local church's SAT tutoring, and the township's multicultural committee.
NEWS
July 26, 2014 | By Kristin E. Holmes, Inquirer Staff Writer
The pastor assured the crowd that his congregation wanted the same things as the residents who are worried about a plan to build a new church in the Hatfield Township neighborhood. "You want open space. We want open space. You want walking trails, we want walking trails," John Cope, pastor of Keystone Fellowship in Montgomeryville, told the standing-room-only audience at the township building. "Softball fields, baseball fields. We want that. " But many neighbors don't want an expansive new building - church or otherwise - in the middle of it all. That difference of opinion is at the core of the church's effort to change the zoning on a 43-acre property it owns, known as the Bishop Tract, to let it build a 75,000-square-foot facility on Orvilla Road.
SPORTS
July 13, 2014 | By Jen A. Miller, For The Inquirer
Last week, Oiselle, a women's athletic apparel company, tweeted the following: "Urban running tip: cure a mid-run bonk with a free honey packet - available in most grocery store deli areas. " Not a bad idea, I thought. A bonk is when you just can't run anymore, usually because you're dehydrated or you're running low on the electrolytes your body needs to make your muscles go. Honey has glucose, a key electrolyte. I've been caught on a hot run without enough fuel and could have used some sustenance to get me through, but I never thought of free honey packets at the Wawa coffee bar as an easy-to-grab solution.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 25, 2014 | By Dan DeLuca, Inquirer Music Critic
The fourth album Philadelphia songwriter Timothy Showalter has recorded under the name Strand of Oaks arrives with its title in all capital letters. It's called HEAL . "It's not like 'It'll be better,' " Showalter says, his voice dropping to a whisper, then rising to a shout. "It's like, 'It'll be . . . BETTER. You better believe it's going to be better!' It's slapping yourself in the face to make sure you're held accountable to the idea that you are going to heal. " Showalter's three previous Strand of Oaks albums - Leave Ruin (2009)
BUSINESS
April 14, 2014 | By Jeff Gelles, Inquirer Columnist
Say you're sitting in a coffee shop, and pull out your laptop or tablet to check your Web mail or bank balance. Fleetingly, you may wonder just how secure these things are. But then you're reassured by a Web address that begins with "https" and displays a comforting icon: a padlock. We learned last week that we were a little too comforted by those symbols of security - each signs that a website uses a protocol known as SSL, in which the first S stands for secure . For two years - ever since a German engineer updated a section of code on New Year's Eve 2011 - a widely used version, OpenSSL, has been anything but secure, thanks to a bug nicknamed Heartbleed.
NEWS
December 24, 2013 | By Mike Newall, Inquirer Staff Writer
One woman was sitting in a window seat at La Colombe, lost in a discussion about a Macy's sale, when someone snatched her wallet from her purse. Alyssa Abbott had just finished lunch at a Chestnut Street cafe when she noticed how light her tote bag felt. And Temple University student Rachael Young was packing up her laptop at Starbucks when she realized her wallet was gone. Pickpockets. Or, more precisely, the work of what police now call "sneak thieves. " If the best friend of the coffeehouse thief is distraction, then the holiday season, with its crowded shops of hurried shoppers, offers the pickpocket prime opportunities.
NEWS
December 7, 2013
Spare a marble? As a project for our Temple University course, my fellow students and I were asked to develop solutions for those living on the streets. Our contribution isn't to offer the homeless shelter or a change of clothes, but rather a simple cup of coffee. At local coffee shops, we're promoting a concept in use in Europe known as "suspended coffee. " With the agreement of shop owners, customers who buy an item at full price can opt for purchasing a "suspended" good at half price, for which the customer receives a marble to drop into a jar. Then, homeless individuals can walk into the coffee shop, take a marble from the jar, and receive one free item per day as long as there is a marble available.
NEWS
August 28, 2013 | By Sulaiman Abdur-Rahman, Inquirer Staff Writer
A vandal smashed two windows of a coffee shop in South Philadelphia's Point Breeze neighborhood over the weekend, causing about $2,000 in property damage, police said. The owner of OCF Coffee House, Ori C. Feibush, said Monday that he reviewed surveillance video of the incident and is "confident" police will identify and arrest the culprit. "The video clearly shows this was deliberate, it was planned, and it was coordinated," said Feibush, 29, a real estate developer. Feibush, who has been embroiled in a long-running dispute with residents who oppose his redevelopment company, blamed the attack on a neighborhood group, the Point Breeze Organizing Committee.
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