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Coffee Table

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LIVING
December 15, 1996 | By Carlin Romano, INQUIRER BOOK CRITIC
Will the bull market in coffee-table books ever break? Some observers see "irrational exuberance" in the way the gift tomes, oblivious to the media spin that only electronic text matters these days, keeps growing in size and luster. This season's Borobudur (Abbeville, $125), a monumental look at the gigantic Buddhist complex in Central Java, purports to come from a traditional art-book publisher. My money says Boeing built it, and there's a cover-up underway. Folks, anyway, like these things.
NEWS
December 3, 2001
Last year, 19.5 billion catalogs were mailed in the United States - that's 71 catalogs for every man, woman and child. . . . Producing a catalog uses up trees, energy and water, and produces pollution. The fact that catalogs are made of virgin paper - rather than recycled - makes the problem worse. A 1999 study . . . found that recycled paper use was virtually nonexistent among leading catalogers.. . . It's time for the entire catalog industry to make the switch to recycled paper. With nearly 3.6 million tons of paper going into catalogs last year, more than 850,000 tons of wood . . . would be saved each year.
LIVING
December 17, 2008 | By Jen A. Miller FOR THE INQUIRER
'I don't like the phrase of coffee-table books," says Michael Fox, owner of Philadelphia's Joseph Fox Bookshop. "We never use the word because I find it a bit demeaning. It suggests that their only purpose is to sit on a coffee table and look good. " Whatever you call them, bookstores are full of these big, glossy tomes during the holiday shopping season. The best of the best do more than just showcase pictures. They offer commentary and context about their subjects, whether it's art, photography, architecture or fashion, which makes them a perfect, personalized gift for that hard-to-please friend - or yourself.
LIVING
December 12, 2004 | By Carlin Romano INQUIRER BOOK CRITIC
Every year at this time, book buyers want more between their covers - a coffee-table book, which has come to mean a book as large as a coffee-table, not something that goes on one. No one in book publishing knows exactly why. Jewelers don't make their rings larger as Thanksgiving launches the shopping season. Florists don't start selling 600-rose bouquets. But book buyers want big. This year's holiday offerings, like every year's, cover the waterfront from inspired, elegant and sublime to contrived, cliched and combustible.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 30, 2016 | By Jennifer Adams
Q: I love books. I love going to bookstores, libraries, and looking through the book sections in antiques stores. I have quite a few, and the thought of parting with even one book breaks my heart. But my husband thinks they look messy. My dream is to have a dining room/library. How can I do this and make it look good? - W. A: Books are a great way to make a home feel lived in, and I love the idea of a dining room/library. I especially appreciate oversize older coffee-table books about art or design.
NEWS
April 22, 1991 | G. LOIE GROSSMANN/ DAILY NEWS
It didn't exactly bring back memories of the '70s, but yesterday's Earth SunDay in the Park at Memorial Hall had a little something for everyone. Sitting behind a coffee table made of recycled newspapers, Jack Vinson (left) and John Powell got a chance to do a little reading. And Frances Thomas and her daughter, Marian, 9, got a look at a turtle from the Philadelphia Zoo that's an endangered species.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 12, 2016 | Jennifer Adams
Q: I love reading your advice every week in the newspaper, but I have never seen anyone ask this question. What's the worst furniture arrangement you've ever seen, or, maybe, what's the one thing should I never do in my living room? - J.F. A: The fun part about decorating your house is that there really are no rules - beyond making sure things function, and your home feels just right to you. I prefer to think about it in terms of what you should do rather than what you shouldn't do. If I were to share a pet peeve, I'd have to say it bothers me when the furniture in a living room is too far apart, or when there is no coffee table in front of the sofa.
NEWS
April 18, 2003
RE: CHRIS Fariello's April 10 sex column on sex with animals: I found the subject extremely inappropriate and absolutely DISGUSTING. Even if there are some individuals, and I believe them to be very few and far between, who indulge in such demented acts, I see no value in this subject. Whatever happened to journalistic responsibility? Or has that too become an oxymoron? Jeff Reynolds Morrisville, Pa. You should be ashamed of yourself for allowing "liberal-thinking" Chris Fariello to respond to a woman about having sex with her dog. Fariello ought to be fired and the editor should be reprimanded for allowing such trash in print.
NEWS
October 6, 1990
To those of us who remember Hugh Scott as a towering figure in the U.S. Senate and on the Philadelphia political scene - and a consummate gentleman - it's sad to learn that, at age 90, he's had a stroke, suffers from Parkinson's disease and, according to an assistant, "appears confused on the outside. " The Hugh Scott we remember is obviously the Hugh Scott his once and future colleagues remember. A room was named for him in the Capitol at a ceremony Tuesday. From your former constituents, Senator, thanks for a job well done.
LIVING
August 30, 2002 | By Kate Campbell FOR THE INQUIRER
Two baby dolls peeked from a toy carriage at the foot of the stairs in Eva and Larry Klebanoff's small Flourtown living room. Plastic dinosaurs and a clunky pair of ceramic cowboy boots staked out a nook. The space had morphed into part meeting place, part dumping ground - the upshot of balancing two full-time careers and life with two children, 5-year-old Zackary and 2-year-old Caroline. "It was just the room that had everything in it," Eva Klebanoff said, sighing over the state of this particular 11-by-17-foot portion of her two-story Colonial.
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ENTERTAINMENT
July 30, 2016 | By Jennifer Adams
Q: I love books. I love going to bookstores, libraries, and looking through the book sections in antiques stores. I have quite a few, and the thought of parting with even one book breaks my heart. But my husband thinks they look messy. My dream is to have a dining room/library. How can I do this and make it look good? - W. A: Books are a great way to make a home feel lived in, and I love the idea of a dining room/library. I especially appreciate oversize older coffee-table books about art or design.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 12, 2016 | Jennifer Adams
Q: I love reading your advice every week in the newspaper, but I have never seen anyone ask this question. What's the worst furniture arrangement you've ever seen, or, maybe, what's the one thing should I never do in my living room? - J.F. A: The fun part about decorating your house is that there really are no rules - beyond making sure things function, and your home feels just right to you. I prefer to think about it in terms of what you should do rather than what you shouldn't do. If I were to share a pet peeve, I'd have to say it bothers me when the furniture in a living room is too far apart, or when there is no coffee table in front of the sofa.
NEWS
December 7, 2015 | By Frank Wilson, For The Inquirer
Once again, it's that time of year when merry gentlemen and ladies go looking for books to give to friends and family. Real books. Beautiful books. Books you put on display, not away. Among the best this year is a comprehensive look at American still-life painting. Another reveals how Dutch painting in its heyday helped distinguish high from low in Dutch society. There's a book about the most-photographed 19th-century American and another about a well-traveled sphinx. There are books on the beauty of dragonflies, flowers, and even New Jersey, and much more.
REAL_ESTATE
June 28, 2015 | By Sally A. Downey, For The Inquirer
Jen Cohen knew what she wanted: "a house with character. " She and husband Brett liked the family-friendly Wynnewood neighborhood they had lived in for six years, but their 1960s home was a hodgepodge of styles. They were ready for a change, but "there was nothing for sale," Jen says. Then, last year, she saw a Facebook posting by a former neighbor who had moved to Boston. She had been renting out her house and was ready to sell. The Cohens promptly purchased the charming 1928 stone Colonial.
REAL_ESTATE
October 12, 2014 | By Catherine Laughlin, For The Inquirer
Once Dora Siemel saw the cedar house on the Unami Watershed in Green Lane, Montgomery County, she knew she had found a place Buddha would have yearned for. The setting is calming, verdant and serene. "There is no ugly way to get here," she says of the journey through abundant woodlands, where creeks snake past colossal boulders. The land is home to fox, deer, trout, and several species of salamander. That tranquil spirit also exists inside the two-story, 2,200-square-foot house where Siemel and her husband, Bob Wolfarth, have lived for 22 years.
NEWS
December 14, 2012
Q: I'm a man in my mid-30s and none of my relationships seem to work out. I'll really fall for a woman, but then the more I get to know her, the more she seems different from how I perceived her when I first met. I always end up disappointed. I assumed I'd meet someone and get married, but at my age, I'm beginning to wonder. Steve: People are complicated. And relationships are fluid. As the great Mort Sahl observed, "Women marry men hoping they will change, and men marry women hoping they won't.
SPORTS
November 19, 2012
LANDOVER, Md. - The bad news, of course, if you really, really want the bad news, is that the Washington Redskins are a pretty awful football team. Not so awful they couldn't lay a 31-6 pasting on the somnolent Eagles on Sunday, the kind of outing that Ray Rhodes used to call a "good old country butt-kicking. " Ray knew about those, about what happens when a team ceases to either believe or care. His tenure as head coach ended in that kind of disarray and now, 14 years later, the guy who replaced him is facing the same situation.
REAL_ESTATE
August 27, 2012 | By Sally Friedman, For The Inquirer
The first thing a visitor might notice at the Abo house, set on a quiet, dignified street in Cherry Hill, is its second outdoor mailbox. Shaped like an airplane, it sits suspended on a pole above the other box and says simply "Air Mail. " Nearby, a small "Beer Garden" sign points to bottles planted upside-down in a cluster of shrubs. And then, there's the notice that reads: "In 1897, absolutely nothing happened at this location. " Very soon it becomes very clear that Jane and Marty Abo's home is not your run-of-the-mill suburban retreat.
NEWS
March 25, 2012 | By Lisa Scottoline, Inquirer Columnist
Here's something I do that might be crazy: I rearrange the furniture. Often. Blind people don't stand a chance in my house. And most of the time, neither do I. Rearranging the furniture is one of my favorite bad habits. My most favorite bad habit is eating chocolate cake, and my least favorite bad habit is marrying badly. It all began with an ottoman, which somehow expanded into the Ottoman Empire. Let me explain. I was sitting on my couch in the family room, working on my laptop with the TV on. I went to put my feet up on the coffee table, and my foot knocked over a mug of coffee.
NEWS
March 2, 2012 | By Stacy Downs, McClatchy Newspapers
KANSAS CITY, Mo. - So much is happening with the coffee table that Cosmo Kramer needs to update his coffee-table book on coffee tables. During the 1990s Seinfeld era, the coffee table was mainly a place to place food and remote controls - and maybe rest your feet when Mom wasn't looking. The ubiquitous wooden piece of furniture was a far cry from the 1950s cocktail table, limbo-low with a sculptural wooden or chrome base and an elegant round glass top. Home furnishings design forecaster Michelle Lamb is seeing a return to artistry in coffee tables, and more function than ever.
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