CollectionsCoffee
IN THE NEWS

Coffee

FOOD
March 17, 2011 | By Craig LaBan, Inquirer Restaurant Critic
If most normal humans are made up of nearly 90 percent water, I am at the very least 80 percent coffee. Not only do I drink it from morning to night, loving the hot black spark perking through my body and mind, I've come to savor its myriad roasty flavors, the manual craft of brewing gear, and especially its culture of rituals - which can be oh-so-hard to change. Like most discerning Philadelphians, my ritual for more than a decade has been a cup of La Colombe, the city's "house brew," judging by the number of restaurants and cafes that have a pot of Corsica or shot of Nizza at the ready.
FOOD
March 17, 2011 | By Elisa Ludwig, For The Inquirer
With an espresso bar on every block, our appetite for coffee beverages is clearly insatiable. But while the rest of us are hopped up on latte art, dripped cups, and bean-origin debates, chefs are sneaking coffee into the kitchen and starting to percolate recipes that maximize its culinary potential. "As an ingredient, coffee is bitter on its own, but if you use it the right way and balance its flavor properly, it can add great depth to food," says David Clouser, chef-owner of Sola BYOB in Bryn Mawr.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 1, 2012
* DANGEROUS GROUNDS. 10 p.m. Monday, Travel Channel. New episodes will be at 9 p.m. Tuesdays beginning Nov. 13. EVEN OVER the phone, Todd Carmichael sounds caffeinated. The co-founder of Philly-based La Colombe Torrefaction probably doesn't need his own high-end coffee to stay awake, though. He's an adrenaline junkie, having set a world record for a solo, unsupported trek to the South Pole and twice tried to do the same with Death Valley. And that's just what he does for fun. "I can't deny the fact that I like to kind of move outside my own comfort zone and outside the kind of traditional path," said Carmichael, who, starting Monday, will be letting Travel Channel viewers in on the dicier parts of his day job as his new show, "Dangerous Grounds," premieres after the series finale of "Anthony Bourdain: No Reservations.
NEWS
May 31, 2012 | By Mensah M. Dean and Daily News Staff Writer
DAVID TIMBERS, the hotheaded patron who tossed a cup of coffee in the face of a doughnut-shop employee two weeks ago, calmed down enough Wednesday to waive his right to a preliminary hearing at the Criminal Justice Center and later apologized to the victim.   "What happened was, I made the biggest mistake of my life and I'm truly sorry for the physical pain that I caused the victim as well as emotional pain, and I just wish it never happened, but it did," Timbers told reporters outside the courthouse . "And I'm truly, truly sorry to the victim.
NEWS
April 17, 2014 | By Joseph A. Slobodzian, Inquirer Staff Writer
A West Philadelphia man was sentenced to 111/2 to 23 months in prison Tuesday for throwing a cup of scalding-hot coffee on a doughnut shop cashier as they argued about his bill. "I want to apologize to the victim for the harm I caused her," David Timbers told Common Pleas Court Judge Rayford A. Means. "There's no excuse for what I've done. " Means sentenced Timbers, 54, well below the 48 to 66 months in prison recommended by state sentencing guidelines, because, he said, he wanted the victim's medical bills reimbursed as soon as possible.
NEWS
July 19, 2013 | BY GARY THOMPSON, Daily News Staff Writer thompsg@phillynews.com, 215-854-5992
THE action-comedy "Red" was like "The Expendables" with brains, and so became a surprise hit two years ago, especially on DVD/demand. So it's back, with Retired but Extremely Dangerous agents Bruce Willis, John Malkovich, Helen Mirren, Brian Cox - also Mary Louise Parker as the average citizen swept up in their intrigue, playing the adorable Midwestern love interest for international neck-snapper Willis. What's not back is the fun meeting these characters, and what's especially not fun is seeing some of the actors going through the motions.
NEWS
January 10, 2016 | By Lisa Scottoline, Inquirer Columnist
Mommy has a new wish. Besides Bradley Cooper. We're talking coffee. And I'm on a quest. I know, some people climb Everest. Others try to cure cancer. But all I want is a delicious cup of coffee that I can make myself, at home. Is that so much to ask? Evidently. Right out front, I have to confess that I love Dunkin' Donuts coffee. Sometimes I'll have Starbucks and other times Wawa, but my coffee soul mate is Dunkin'. We've been together longer than my two marriages combined.
NEWS
February 28, 2014
J AMES FAYAL, 23, of Rittenhouse Square, is founder of Zest Tea Company. The company has developed four high-quality tea blends that have more caffeine than coffee without the unwanted side effects. In July, Fayal, who's also controller at NextFab Studio, raised nearly $10,000 through a crowdfunding competition. He began selling tea from Zest Tea's website last month. Q: How did you come up with the idea for Zest Tea? A: A friend and I are tea drinkers and discussed ways to make tea more caffeinated without the side effects of coffee.
NEWS
January 8, 2016 | Craig LaBan, Inquirer Restaurant Critic
Aside from redefining the quality possibilities for the mass-market burger, Shake Shack was among the first fast-food chains to feature local craft beers (not to mention good wine) behind a cash register. Its latest offering, in collaboration with Philly stars La Colombe and Yards, is a coffee stout that's also a benefit, with $2 of every pint going to the City of Philadelphia Mural Arts Program. This will be familiar to those who've tasted Yards' annual edition of Love Stout infused with dark Corsica beans, a style that's great with a meaty burger or one of the Shack's creamy vanilla frozen custards.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 30, 2012 | By Sandy Bauers, Inquirer GreenSpace Columnist
The goldfinches have long since devoured the sunflower seed heads in my garden. Time to get out the feeders and go buy birdseed. Estimates are fuzzy, but at least 55 million Americans join me in this effort, says George Petrides Sr., managing director of the National Bird-Feeding Society. And we spend a hefty sum doing it. Expenditures on seed, feeders, birdbaths, birdhouses, and the like come to $4.5 billion a year, he said. Helping birds doesn't have to stop there. Two other consumer choices are important - paper products and coffee.
« Prev | 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
|
|
|
|
|