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NEWS
May 31, 2012 | By Mensah M. Dean and Daily News Staff Writer
DAVID TIMBERS, the hotheaded patron who tossed a cup of coffee in the face of a doughnut-shop employee two weeks ago, calmed down enough Wednesday to waive his right to a preliminary hearing at the Criminal Justice Center and later apologized to the victim.   "What happened was, I made the biggest mistake of my life and I'm truly sorry for the physical pain that I caused the victim as well as emotional pain, and I just wish it never happened, but it did," Timbers told reporters outside the courthouse . "And I'm truly, truly sorry to the victim.
NEWS
July 19, 2013 | BY GARY THOMPSON, Daily News Staff Writer thompsg@phillynews.com, 215-854-5992
THE action-comedy "Red" was like "The Expendables" with brains, and so became a surprise hit two years ago, especially on DVD/demand. So it's back, with Retired but Extremely Dangerous agents Bruce Willis, John Malkovich, Helen Mirren, Brian Cox - also Mary Louise Parker as the average citizen swept up in their intrigue, playing the adorable Midwestern love interest for international neck-snapper Willis. What's not back is the fun meeting these characters, and what's especially not fun is seeing some of the actors going through the motions.
NEWS
January 10, 2016 | By Lisa Scottoline, Inquirer Columnist
Mommy has a new wish. Besides Bradley Cooper. We're talking coffee. And I'm on a quest. I know, some people climb Everest. Others try to cure cancer. But all I want is a delicious cup of coffee that I can make myself, at home. Is that so much to ask? Evidently. Right out front, I have to confess that I love Dunkin' Donuts coffee. Sometimes I'll have Starbucks and other times Wawa, but my coffee soul mate is Dunkin'. We've been together longer than my two marriages combined.
FOOD
March 17, 2011 | By Craig LaBan, Inquirer Restaurant Critic
If most normal humans are made up of nearly 90 percent water, I am at the very least 80 percent coffee. Not only do I drink it from morning to night, loving the hot black spark perking through my body and mind, I've come to savor its myriad roasty flavors, the manual craft of brewing gear, and especially its culture of rituals - which can be oh-so-hard to change. Like most discerning Philadelphians, my ritual for more than a decade has been a cup of La Colombe, the city's "house brew," judging by the number of restaurants and cafes that have a pot of Corsica or shot of Nizza at the ready.
BUSINESS
February 11, 2014 | By Diane Mastrull, Inquirer Columnist
Peering through the plate-glass windows of the new retail space on Market Street in West Philadelphia, Jiaqi Wu thought she was looking at just another coffee shop in a town brimming with them. Then she reconsidered, thinking they must be serving something extraordinary, given the name on the door: The Creative Café @ Replica. "I was wondering if the coffee itself was creative," recalled Wu, a Californian pursuing a master's degree in applied positive psychology from the University of Pennsylvania.
NEWS
February 28, 2014
J AMES FAYAL, 23, of Rittenhouse Square, is founder of Zest Tea Company. The company has developed four high-quality tea blends that have more caffeine than coffee without the unwanted side effects. In July, Fayal, who's also controller at NextFab Studio, raised nearly $10,000 through a crowdfunding competition. He began selling tea from Zest Tea's website last month. Q: How did you come up with the idea for Zest Tea? A: A friend and I are tea drinkers and discussed ways to make tea more caffeinated without the side effects of coffee.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 30, 2012 | By Sandy Bauers, Inquirer GreenSpace Columnist
The goldfinches have long since devoured the sunflower seed heads in my garden. Time to get out the feeders and go buy birdseed. Estimates are fuzzy, but at least 55 million Americans join me in this effort, says George Petrides Sr., managing director of the National Bird-Feeding Society. And we spend a hefty sum doing it. Expenditures on seed, feeders, birdbaths, birdhouses, and the like come to $4.5 billion a year, he said. Helping birds doesn't have to stop there. Two other consumer choices are important - paper products and coffee.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 8, 2012 | BY JOY MANNING, For the Daily News
YOU PROBABLY give little thought to the mug that holds your morning cup of joe. For some, that vessel is a work of art unto itself. On Thursday morning, the Clay Studio, a gallery and retail space in Old City dedicated to handmade ceramics, hopes to change the way some local coffee drinkers think about their own usual mugs. During the studio's Guerrilla Mug Assault, volunteers will gather at six secret locations to surprise morning commuters by replacing their usual cup with a one-of-a-kind handmade mug. Five hundred mugs crafted by 50 artists, many from the Philadelphia area, will be given away.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 29, 2014 | By Terri Akman, For The Inquirer
Have it your way. No, not your fast-food burger. Your prayer. In an age when convenience is king and religion is often ridiculed, some churches looking to widen their outreach efforts are embracing what community banks and pharmacies have utilized for decades: the drive-through. The latest to offer a bit of spiritual uplift in the comfort of your car is Hope United Methodist Church in Voorhees. "People go to Dunkin' Donuts for coffee, not because it's the best coffee, but because it's the most convenient," reasoned Hope's lead pastor, Jeff Bills.
NEWS
January 15, 2016 | Staff
Yes, it's true, coffee fiends: Even in the long-ago days before pour-overs and latte florettes, before single-origin beans, small-batch roasters, soul-patched baristas and all that artisinal obsessiveness, coffee was essential stuff. People drank it to wake up in the morning, to pick themselves up in the afternoon, to keep going through those graveyard shifts. And nowhere was coffee more of a force - and a fuel - than on the soundstages and craft services tables of the Hollywood studios, where actors had to throw on makeup and costumes before dawn, where takes and retakes required constant reinvigoration, where the pages of shooting scripts were marked with coffee cup rings and splashes of java.
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