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NEWS
July 19, 2013 | BY GARY THOMPSON, Daily News Staff Writer thompsg@phillynews.com, 215-854-5992
THE action-comedy "Red" was like "The Expendables" with brains, and so became a surprise hit two years ago, especially on DVD/demand. So it's back, with Retired but Extremely Dangerous agents Bruce Willis, John Malkovich, Helen Mirren, Brian Cox - also Mary Louise Parker as the average citizen swept up in their intrigue, playing the adorable Midwestern love interest for international neck-snapper Willis. What's not back is the fun meeting these characters, and what's especially not fun is seeing some of the actors going through the motions.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 1, 2012
* DANGEROUS GROUNDS. 10 p.m. Monday, Travel Channel. New episodes will be at 9 p.m. Tuesdays beginning Nov. 13. EVEN OVER the phone, Todd Carmichael sounds caffeinated. The co-founder of Philly-based La Colombe Torrefaction probably doesn't need his own high-end coffee to stay awake, though. He's an adrenaline junkie, having set a world record for a solo, unsupported trek to the South Pole and twice tried to do the same with Death Valley. And that's just what he does for fun. "I can't deny the fact that I like to kind of move outside my own comfort zone and outside the kind of traditional path," said Carmichael, who, starting Monday, will be letting Travel Channel viewers in on the dicier parts of his day job as his new show, "Dangerous Grounds," premieres after the series finale of "Anthony Bourdain: No Reservations.
NEWS
May 31, 2012 | By Mensah M. Dean and Daily News Staff Writer
DAVID TIMBERS, the hotheaded patron who tossed a cup of coffee in the face of a doughnut-shop employee two weeks ago, calmed down enough Wednesday to waive his right to a preliminary hearing at the Criminal Justice Center and later apologized to the victim.   "What happened was, I made the biggest mistake of my life and I'm truly sorry for the physical pain that I caused the victim as well as emotional pain, and I just wish it never happened, but it did," Timbers told reporters outside the courthouse . "And I'm truly, truly sorry to the victim.
NEWS
February 28, 2014
J AMES FAYAL, 23, of Rittenhouse Square, is founder of Zest Tea Company. The company has developed four high-quality tea blends that have more caffeine than coffee without the unwanted side effects. In July, Fayal, who's also controller at NextFab Studio, raised nearly $10,000 through a crowdfunding competition. He began selling tea from Zest Tea's website last month. Q: How did you come up with the idea for Zest Tea? A: A friend and I are tea drinkers and discussed ways to make tea more caffeinated without the side effects of coffee.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 8, 2012 | BY JOY MANNING, For the Daily News
YOU PROBABLY give little thought to the mug that holds your morning cup of joe. For some, that vessel is a work of art unto itself. On Thursday morning, the Clay Studio, a gallery and retail space in Old City dedicated to handmade ceramics, hopes to change the way some local coffee drinkers think about their own usual mugs. During the studio's Guerrilla Mug Assault, volunteers will gather at six secret locations to surprise morning commuters by replacing their usual cup with a one-of-a-kind handmade mug. Five hundred mugs crafted by 50 artists, many from the Philadelphia area, will be given away.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 30, 2012 | By Sandy Bauers, Inquirer GreenSpace Columnist
The goldfinches have long since devoured the sunflower seed heads in my garden. Time to get out the feeders and go buy birdseed. Estimates are fuzzy, but at least 55 million Americans join me in this effort, says George Petrides Sr., managing director of the National Bird-Feeding Society. And we spend a hefty sum doing it. Expenditures on seed, feeders, birdbaths, birdhouses, and the like come to $4.5 billion a year, he said. Helping birds doesn't have to stop there. Two other consumer choices are important - paper products and coffee.
NEWS
June 4, 2011 | By DANA DiFILIPPO, difilid@phillynews.com 215-854-5934
In a world where people sue McDonald's for serving coffee too hot, a Philadelphia woman has sued a Dunkin' Donuts for serving coffee she says was too sweet - so sweet it sent her into a diabetic coma. Danielle Jordan, 47, of Oxford Avenue near Langdon Street in Crescentville, filed a personal-injury lawsuit against the Dunkin' Donuts on Frankford Avenue near Bridge Street and Northeast Donut Shops Management Corp. Jordan is seeking unspecified damages for problems caused after she ordered coffee with artificial sweetener on June 15, 2009, but the server put sugar into the brew, according to the suit, which was first reported by the Courthouse News Service.
NEWS
June 3, 2011 | By DANA DiFILIPPO, difilid@phillynews.com 215-854-5934
In a world where people sue McDonald's for serving coffee too hot, a Philadelphia woman has sued a Dunkin' Donuts for serving coffee she says was too sweet - so sweet it sent her into a diabetic coma. Danielle Jordan, 47, of Oxford Avenue near Langdon Street in Crescentville, filed a personal injury lawsuit against the Dunkin' Donuts on Frankford Avenue near Bridge Street and Northeast Donut Shops Management Corp. Jordan is seeking unspecified damages after she claims she ordered coffee with artificial sweetener on June 15, 2009, but the server put sugar into the brew, according to the suit, which was first reported this morning by the Courthouse News Service.
NEWS
May 25, 2012 | By Lanny Morgnanesi
By Lanny Morgnanesi   I've become free of a drink that controlled too much of my day and punished me with physical pain if I ignored it.   It's fun to joke about coffee. But I'm not joking. I'm the type of person who gets incredible headaches from caffeine withdrawal. If I was running a little late in the morning, unable to make or purchase coffee, I'd arrive at work wondering when and how I would get my coffee. If I decided to wait until after a morning meeting, and the meeting ran long or something else came up, I'd missed my chance, and a monster within me would put a clamp on my brain.
NEWS
May 23, 2013 | By Walter F. Naedele, Inquirer Staff Writer
Tom's Lunch, which stood across from the Budd Co. factory in Nicetown, had a family history touching two families. It was named Pete's, after Tom Bezanis' father, when it opened in the 1920s in a tin shed on Hunting Park Avenue near Fox Street. But Tom told a Philadelphia Daily News reporter in 2003 that one day, Edward G. Budd, an executive of the family-owned firm and a regular customer, told Pete that he had bought the property and that Pete's would have to move nearby. The reporter wrote, "Budd built him a new place and said he'd never have to worry about the rent.
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