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NEWS
June 4, 2011 | By DANA DiFILIPPO, difilid@phillynews.com 215-854-5934
In a world where people sue McDonald's for serving coffee too hot, a Philadelphia woman has sued a Dunkin' Donuts for serving coffee she says was too sweet - so sweet it sent her into a diabetic coma. Danielle Jordan, 47, of Oxford Avenue near Langdon Street in Crescentville, filed a personal-injury lawsuit against the Dunkin' Donuts on Frankford Avenue near Bridge Street and Northeast Donut Shops Management Corp. Jordan is seeking unspecified damages for problems caused after she ordered coffee with artificial sweetener on June 15, 2009, but the server put sugar into the brew, according to the suit, which was first reported by the Courthouse News Service.
NEWS
June 3, 2011 | By DANA DiFILIPPO, difilid@phillynews.com 215-854-5934
In a world where people sue McDonald's for serving coffee too hot, a Philadelphia woman has sued a Dunkin' Donuts for serving coffee she says was too sweet - so sweet it sent her into a diabetic coma. Danielle Jordan, 47, of Oxford Avenue near Langdon Street in Crescentville, filed a personal injury lawsuit against the Dunkin' Donuts on Frankford Avenue near Bridge Street and Northeast Donut Shops Management Corp. Jordan is seeking unspecified damages after she claims she ordered coffee with artificial sweetener on June 15, 2009, but the server put sugar into the brew, according to the suit, which was first reported this morning by the Courthouse News Service.
BUSINESS
January 17, 2016
5 million products produced in 2015 450,000 miles flown by Pop! Promos team annually 4,500 cups of coffee consumed by staff annually 500 product renderings created a day 2 office dogs
NEWS
May 25, 2012 | By Lanny Morgnanesi
By Lanny Morgnanesi   I've become free of a drink that controlled too much of my day and punished me with physical pain if I ignored it.   It's fun to joke about coffee. But I'm not joking. I'm the type of person who gets incredible headaches from caffeine withdrawal. If I was running a little late in the morning, unable to make or purchase coffee, I'd arrive at work wondering when and how I would get my coffee. If I decided to wait until after a morning meeting, and the meeting ran long or something else came up, I'd missed my chance, and a monster within me would put a clamp on my brain.
NEWS
January 15, 2016 | Staff
Yes, it's true, coffee fiends: Even in the long-ago days before pour-overs and latte florettes, before single-origin beans, small-batch roasters, soul-patched baristas and all that artisinal obsessiveness, coffee was essential stuff. People drank it to wake up in the morning, to pick themselves up in the afternoon, to keep going through those graveyard shifts. And nowhere was coffee more of a force - and a fuel - than on the soundstages and craft services tables of the Hollywood studios, where actors had to throw on makeup and costumes before dawn, where takes and retakes required constant reinvigoration, where the pages of shooting scripts were marked with coffee cup rings and splashes of java.
FOOD
March 17, 2011
A proper red-eye gravy gets its bold richness in part from a dose of strong black coffee. Shawn Sollberger, chef and co-owner of the new Northern Liberties pub Gunners Run, combines his grandfather's technique for chicken-fried steak with his North Carolina neighbor's red-eye gravy recipe. Instead of adding ham to the gravy, as is the norm, Sollberger crumbles bacon into the oil he uses to pan-fry the top round steak. He deglazes the pan with coffee. It's served with sauteed spinach and black-eyed peas.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 21, 2011 | By MITCHELL LANDSBERG, Los Angeles Times
LOS ANGELES - Sometimes, a cup of coffee is more than just a cup of coffee. That, at least, is the fervent belief of two Arizonans, one a buttoned-down Presbyterian minister, the other a tie-dyed Roman Catholic renegade. They are convinced that a steaming cup of cafe arabica could help solve the problem of illegal immigration. And that's just for starters. They also believe it can bring together liberals and conservatives, fulfill the Old Testament's prophetic vision of a "new heaven and new earth," and bring the wolf together with the lamb.
FOOD
August 14, 2015 | Samantha Melamed
Local hot sauce goes national Yong Chi, owner of Giwa, the Korean fast-casual favorite, is going national with his Yong's Korean Hot Sauce, a variation on the traditional bibimbap topper, made with red pepper, sesame oil, vinegar, and tamari. "A lot of hot sauce only brings heat. This is tangy, spicy and sweet. 'Deliciously Spicy' is our tagline," he said. It is selling at Whole Foods across the Mid-Atlantic and in more than 100 Kroger stores, and there are plans to roll out a Korean barbecue sauce in September.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 1, 2014 | BY MATT NESTOR, Daily News Staff Writer nestorm@phillynews.com, 215-854-5906
IN POINT BREEZE coffee shops, Fishtown pubs and South Street tattoo parlors, Philadelphia has a Secret Admirer . Every week, flash fiction, comics, trivia, crosswords and other quirky muses fill Secret Admirer 's four pages in what its creator, David Commins calls "an art project, more than a journalism project. " There are seemingly no rules for Commins' free, DIY publication, except that Monday is production day and Tuesday is distribution day, a task he completes on his bike.
FOOD
April 19, 2013
Gluten-free, but good The taste and texture of gluten-free products has not necessarily improved with the number of new creations, but the ones from Ginnybakes are an exception. Made with brown rice flour and other organic ingredients, the cookies are baked to a delicate crisp and taste truly as good as those made with wheat, especially the chocolate chip, the butter crisps, and the chocolate chip macadamia. The nut bars, a yummy mix of almonds, pistachios, coconut, and dried fruit, are my new fave.
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