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NEWS
June 3, 2011 | By DANA DiFILIPPO, difilid@phillynews.com 215-854-5934
In a world where people sue McDonald's for serving coffee too hot, a Philadelphia woman has sued a Dunkin' Donuts for serving coffee she says was too sweet - so sweet it sent her into a diabetic coma. Danielle Jordan, 47, of Oxford Avenue near Langdon Street in Crescentville, filed a personal injury lawsuit against the Dunkin' Donuts on Frankford Avenue near Bridge Street and Northeast Donut Shops Management Corp. Jordan is seeking unspecified damages after she claims she ordered coffee with artificial sweetener on June 15, 2009, but the server put sugar into the brew, according to the suit, which was first reported this morning by the Courthouse News Service.
NEWS
January 1, 2016 | By Carolyn Hax
While I'm away, readers give the advice. On ordering a la carte in a prix-fixe world: It seems to me that many of the questions posed to you are asking something impossible. They want to order people in their lives a la carte, picking only the positive things and wanting to extinguish the negative: the perfect boyfriend but . . ., the nice in-laws except . . ., the cool friend group except for this one thing . . .. Accepting imperfections seems such a necessary quality to get through a day, let alone a life.
BUSINESS
January 17, 2016
5 million products produced in 2015 450,000 miles flown by Pop! Promos team annually 4,500 cups of coffee consumed by staff annually 500 product renderings created a day 2 office dogs
NEWS
May 25, 2012 | By Lanny Morgnanesi
By Lanny Morgnanesi   I've become free of a drink that controlled too much of my day and punished me with physical pain if I ignored it.   It's fun to joke about coffee. But I'm not joking. I'm the type of person who gets incredible headaches from caffeine withdrawal. If I was running a little late in the morning, unable to make or purchase coffee, I'd arrive at work wondering when and how I would get my coffee. If I decided to wait until after a morning meeting, and the meeting ran long or something else came up, I'd missed my chance, and a monster within me would put a clamp on my brain.
FOOD
August 14, 2015 | Samantha Melamed
Local hot sauce goes national Yong Chi, owner of Giwa, the Korean fast-casual favorite, is going national with his Yong's Korean Hot Sauce, a variation on the traditional bibimbap topper, made with red pepper, sesame oil, vinegar, and tamari. "A lot of hot sauce only brings heat. This is tangy, spicy and sweet. 'Deliciously Spicy' is our tagline," he said. It is selling at Whole Foods across the Mid-Atlantic and in more than 100 Kroger stores, and there are plans to roll out a Korean barbecue sauce in September.
FOOD
March 17, 2011
A proper red-eye gravy gets its bold richness in part from a dose of strong black coffee. Shawn Sollberger, chef and co-owner of the new Northern Liberties pub Gunners Run, combines his grandfather's technique for chicken-fried steak with his North Carolina neighbor's red-eye gravy recipe. Instead of adding ham to the gravy, as is the norm, Sollberger crumbles bacon into the oil he uses to pan-fry the top round steak. He deglazes the pan with coffee. It's served with sauteed spinach and black-eyed peas.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 29, 2014 | By Terri Akman, For The Inquirer
Have it your way. No, not your fast-food burger. Your prayer. In an age when convenience is king and religion is often ridiculed, some churches looking to widen their outreach efforts are embracing what community banks and pharmacies have utilized for decades: the drive-through. The latest to offer a bit of spiritual uplift in the comfort of your car is Hope United Methodist Church in Voorhees. "People go to Dunkin' Donuts for coffee, not because it's the best coffee, but because it's the most convenient," reasoned Hope's lead pastor, Jeff Bills.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 21, 2011 | By MITCHELL LANDSBERG, Los Angeles Times
LOS ANGELES - Sometimes, a cup of coffee is more than just a cup of coffee. That, at least, is the fervent belief of two Arizonans, one a buttoned-down Presbyterian minister, the other a tie-dyed Roman Catholic renegade. They are convinced that a steaming cup of cafe arabica could help solve the problem of illegal immigration. And that's just for starters. They also believe it can bring together liberals and conservatives, fulfill the Old Testament's prophetic vision of a "new heaven and new earth," and bring the wolf together with the lamb.
NEWS
May 23, 2013 | By Walter F. Naedele, Inquirer Staff Writer
Tom's Lunch, which stood across from the Budd Co. factory in Nicetown, had a family history touching two families. It was named Pete's, after Tom Bezanis' father, when it opened in the 1920s in a tin shed on Hunting Park Avenue near Fox Street. But Tom told a Philadelphia Daily News reporter in 2003 that one day, Edward G. Budd, an executive of the family-owned firm and a regular customer, told Pete that he had bought the property and that Pete's would have to move nearby. The reporter wrote, "Budd built him a new place and said he'd never have to worry about the rent.
NEWS
March 17, 2011 | By Kevin Riordan, Inquirer Columnist
A gallon of gas cost 19.9 cents and Route 38 was two placid lanes of pavement when Louis Stiles opened his Sunoco station in Mount Laurel. Prices and a whole lot more may have changed since 1969, but Stiles still wears a tie daily (and a costume occasionally). Stiles Sunoco still fixes cars. And with its exuberant holiday displays and smiling service, the station is a small-town island in a sea of sprawl. "I have to give my Eleanor credit for the decorations," says Stiles, 72, who lives in Hainesport with his wife of almost 50 years.
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