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NEWS
May 25, 2012 | By Lanny Morgnanesi
By Lanny Morgnanesi   I've become free of a drink that controlled too much of my day and punished me with physical pain if I ignored it.   It's fun to joke about coffee. But I'm not joking. I'm the type of person who gets incredible headaches from caffeine withdrawal. If I was running a little late in the morning, unable to make or purchase coffee, I'd arrive at work wondering when and how I would get my coffee. If I decided to wait until after a morning meeting, and the meeting ran long or something else came up, I'd missed my chance, and a monster within me would put a clamp on my brain.
FOOD
March 17, 2011
A proper red-eye gravy gets its bold richness in part from a dose of strong black coffee. Shawn Sollberger, chef and co-owner of the new Northern Liberties pub Gunners Run, combines his grandfather's technique for chicken-fried steak with his North Carolina neighbor's red-eye gravy recipe. Instead of adding ham to the gravy, as is the norm, Sollberger crumbles bacon into the oil he uses to pan-fry the top round steak. He deglazes the pan with coffee. It's served with sauteed spinach and black-eyed peas.
FOOD
December 8, 2011 | By Caroline Tiger, For The Inquirer
The design came to her in a dream. Just as Keith Richards came up with the riff to "Satisfaction" in his sleep, Cupcake Lady Kate Carrara woke up one Sunday in 2009 and quickly grabbed crayons to record her vision of a cupcake truck. When she brought the drawing of the white box truck sprinkled with giant jimmies and lined with a metal flounce to a car detailer, he said he could do everything except the giant cupcake springing from the roof. "Go under an overpass and you'll knock that thing right off," she remembers him saying.
FOOD
April 19, 2013
Gluten-free, but good The taste and texture of gluten-free products has not necessarily improved with the number of new creations, but the ones from Ginnybakes are an exception. Made with brown rice flour and other organic ingredients, the cookies are baked to a delicate crisp and taste truly as good as those made with wheat, especially the chocolate chip, the butter crisps, and the chocolate chip macadamia. The nut bars, a yummy mix of almonds, pistachios, coconut, and dried fruit, are my new fave.
NEWS
January 11, 2012
PHILADELPHIA Coffee with Bass Freshman Councilwoman Cindy Bass would like to open a district office someday, but in the meantime she's looking to connect with constituents in other ways. Bass, whose district is in northwest Philadelphia, will begin regularly holding "Coffee with the Councilwoman," an opportunity for residents to chat up Bass at their local restaurant, coffeehouse or diner about neighborhood issues. The first coffee meeting will be held from 3 to 5 p.m. Friday.
NEWS
December 7, 2013
Spare a marble? As a project for our Temple University course, my fellow students and I were asked to develop solutions for those living on the streets. Our contribution isn't to offer the homeless shelter or a change of clothes, but rather a simple cup of coffee. At local coffee shops, we're promoting a concept in use in Europe known as "suspended coffee. " With the agreement of shop owners, customers who buy an item at full price can opt for purchasing a "suspended" good at half price, for which the customer receives a marble to drop into a jar. Then, homeless individuals can walk into the coffee shop, take a marble from the jar, and receive one free item per day as long as there is a marble available.
NEWS
May 23, 2013 | By Walter F. Naedele, Inquirer Staff Writer
Tom's Lunch, which stood across from the Budd Co. factory in Nicetown, had a family history touching two families. It was named Pete's, after Tom Bezanis' father, when it opened in the 1920s in a tin shed on Hunting Park Avenue near Fox Street. But Tom told a Philadelphia Daily News reporter in 2003 that one day, Edward G. Budd, an executive of the family-owned firm and a regular customer, told Pete that he had bought the property and that Pete's would have to move nearby. The reporter wrote, "Budd built him a new place and said he'd never have to worry about the rent.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 1, 2014 | BY MATT NESTOR, Daily News Staff Writer nestorm@phillynews.com, 215-854-5906
IN POINT BREEZE coffee shops, Fishtown pubs and South Street tattoo parlors, Philadelphia has a Secret Admirer . Every week, flash fiction, comics, trivia, crosswords and other quirky muses fill Secret Admirer 's four pages in what its creator, David Commins calls "an art project, more than a journalism project. " There are seemingly no rules for Commins' free, DIY publication, except that Monday is production day and Tuesday is distribution day, a task he completes on his bike.
NEWS
March 17, 2011 | By Kevin Riordan, Inquirer Columnist
A gallon of gas cost 19.9 cents and Route 38 was two placid lanes of pavement when Louis Stiles opened his Sunoco station in Mount Laurel. Prices and a whole lot more may have changed since 1969, but Stiles still wears a tie daily (and a costume occasionally). Stiles Sunoco still fixes cars. And with its exuberant holiday displays and smiling service, the station is a small-town island in a sea of sprawl. "I have to give my Eleanor credit for the decorations," says Stiles, 72, who lives in Hainesport with his wife of almost 50 years.
NEWS
March 18, 2014 | BY DAN GERINGER, Daily News Staff Writer geringd@phillynews.com, 215-854-5961
DURING HER early-'90s student days, Melissa Bernard did open-mic nights at the Comedy Cabaret, on Chestnut Street near 2nd, then schmoozed with her fellow stand-ups over postmortem coffee at Nick's Roast Beef. "I would do awful sets that I have no recollection of, just so I could drink Nick's bad coffee afterwards and tell funny stories with other comics," Bernard said. "After a while, I understood that I wasn't really into stand-up, except for the exhilaration of knowing other comics.
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