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Coffee

NEWS
June 26, 1988 | By Wayne Curtis, Special to The Inquirer
There's a technique to visiting country stores in rural Maine. Unfortunately, I don't know it. When I walk into a store like Solari's, here in Fryeburg, the chattering stops and it grows unnaturally quiet. People sitting on stools and milk crates sip coffee, eat their powdered-sugar doughnuts and don't say a word. They just look at me like I've stopped in from Mars on my way to the Maine coast. I've tried most tricks. I've worn baseball caps (Red Sox) and tractor caps (John Deere)
NEWS
June 30, 2015 | By Susan Snyder, Inquirer Staff Writer
The duPont Hospital for Children had too few of the little wagons that young patients prefer to wheelchairs, so Peter Zucca started a foundation to raise money for a fleet of them. A patient couldn't get blood for a transfusion, so Peter planned a series of drives, the first to be held Monday. And when he saw that most books about the challenge of childhood hearing loss "are really bad," he wrote his own. At age 12, Peter Zucca has already had a world of experience with cancer.
LIVING
April 10, 1994 | By Tanya Barrientos, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
If you're looking for excuses to hate Rod and Bob Jackson-Paris, you don't have to look far. You could dislike them for political or moral reasons. The Jackson-Paris guys are gay. They're gay and they're married. They're gay, married and making a pretty good living publicizing it. As if that weren't enough, they're gorgeous. Bob and Rod are buff. They're hunks. Bob, formerly Bob Paris, is a former Mr. Universe. He has curly brown hair and a voice as gravelly as a country road.
NEWS
June 14, 1989 | By Jonathan Sidener, Special to The Inquirer
A riverboat tour of the Delaware River waterfront in Pennsauken will take place Saturday as part of the preparation for the township's 1992 centennial celebration. Participants will get a look at the township's past and future from the decks of the Liberty Bell, a Philadelphia-based tour boat. "We'll have a speaker on the river and the . . . history of Pennsauken, the Indians and the settlers, and how Pennsauken started as a river community," said Bernie Kofoet, chairman of Up With Pennsauken, which is coordinating the event.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 2, 2008
Q: Is prime rib the same thing as a rib-eye steak? If so (or if not), would I prepare them the same way? I enjoy listening to your NPR radio show. Your expertise is greatly appreciated. - Thomas C. A: Thomas, you have brought up an issue most people do not have a clear understanding of that is the subject of much debate. Wars have been waged over less. I'm not talking about the difference between prime rib and rib-eye, I'm talking about my expertise. That being said, and since I have your vote of confidence, let's get down to the bare bones here.
NEWS
April 3, 1992 | This story was reported by Daily News staff writers Kurt Heine, Edward Moran, Dave Racher, Marianne Costantinou, Joseph R. Daughen and John F. Morris, and written by Morrison
When Richard M. Segal heard on the radio that a man named Edward I. Savitz was accused of molesting teen-age boys, he knew he had to call the Ed Savitz he knew and kid him about it. "I thought it had to be somebody with the same name," Segal said. "I thought, 'I have to call Ed and pull his chain.' " But as more details of the case unfolded, Segal, a lawyer who had business dealings with Savitz, came to the horrible realization that this was the Ed Savitz he knew. "I was completely floored," said Segal, who heads the pension department of the law firm of Dilworth, Paxson, Kalish & Kauffman.
FOOD
July 17, 2015 | Craig LaBan, Inquirer Restaurant Critic
City's Latest Hot Roast Philly's ever-perking cafe scene has produced another gem - this one for Logan Square. Peddler Coffee Alchemy, a Port Richmond-based roaster that made its first public forays last year at the Franklin Flea, has settled a permanent cafe with Third Wave style (exposed brick, pour-overs) into the former Darling's space at 21st and Spring Streets behind the Franklin Institute. Peddler leans toward lighter roasts (no "carbon flavor"), but keeps it accessible. I was especially impressed with this Nicaraguan Santa Candida, which is one of Peddler's workhorse beans, prepared with equal success as espresso, iced and silky smooth off the slow-dripping Kyoto brewer, or simply as a traditional drip-filter.
NEWS
April 2, 2004
A group photo will be taken at 11 a.m. tomorrow in front of a former 7-Eleven convenience store at Baltimore and Highland Avenues in Lansdowne. Residents and well-wishers are invited to participate to encourage Starbucks to put a coffee shop there.
NEWS
January 26, 1990 | By ABE ZAIDAN
If ever a medical report had an instant effect on people's lives, it doubtless was the recent bombshell that a cup of coffee - let's see, I want to be sure to get this right - improved one's sex life. The news broke on the same day that we were told oat bran was of less importance than an apple a day in extending your life on earth. Within 24 hours of each other, then, the modern roles of two American staples - coffee and oats - were reversed. Among the many libidinous imbibers, long-maligned coffee was elevated as the elixir of romantic pleasures and oats were downgraded as just one more deceptive marketing scheme.
FOOD
January 21, 1987 | By DEBORAH LICKLIDER, Daily News Food Editor
A program for coffee lovers is being planned at the Historical Society of Pennsylvania, 1300 Locust St., on Saturday. Ruth Isaac of Olde City Coffee will present the program, which includes tastings of exotic beans, coffee history, lore and preparation techniques. It all begins at 11 a.m. The coffee klatch is part of Philadelphia's Warm-Up to Museums Month, a series of special events, activities and exhibits sponsored by the Musaeum Council of Philadelphia and more than 50 Delaware Valley museums.
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